849 Results

Altered brain structural topological properties in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without complications.

Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction, and white matter (WM) microstructural impairments play a critical role in T2DM‐related cognitive decline. Disruptions to the WM have been...

The diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy: current opinions and challenges.

Introduction: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is associated with microtubule-associated protein tau dysfunction. Originally thought to result in a syndrome of atypical Parkinsonism, vertical supranuclear gaze palsy...

Advances in progressive supranuclear palsy: new diagnostic criteria, biomarkers, and therapeutic approaches.

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), previously believed to be a common cause of atypical parkinsonism, is now recognised as a range of motor and behavioural syndromes that are associated with a characteristic 4-repeat tau neuropathology.

Anti-inflammatory drug use and progressive supranuclear palsy.

Background: Anti-inflammatory drug use, particularly ibuprofen, has been associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Microglial activation and inflammatory cytokine expression have been shown to be pathological...

Progressive supranuclear palsy and idiopathic Parkinson's disease are associated with local reduction of in vivo brain viscoelasticity.

Objectives: To apply three-dimensional multifrequency MR-elastography (3DMRE) for the measurement of local cerebral viscoelasticity changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).

A randomized, single ascending dose study of intravenous BIIB092 in healthy participants.

Introduction: Extracellular tau is hypothesized to mediate the onset and progression of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and a subset of frontotemporal lobar degenerations.

The Role of Rehabilitation in Patients With Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A Narrative Review.

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the deposition of abnormal proteins in neurons of the basal ganglia that limit motor ability, resulting in disability and reduced quality...

Evaluation of Retinal Changes in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Parkinson Disease.

Background: Differentiating Parkinson disease (PD) from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) can be challenging early in the clinical course. The aim of our study was to see if specific retinal changes could serve as...

Blink reflex recovery cycle to differentiate progressive supranuclear palsy from corticobasal syndrome.

Background and purpose: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) may share similar clinical findings and tests to distinguish between the two disorders could be useful. We evaluated the blink reflex...

Emerging drugs for progressive supranuclear palsy.

Introduction: Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a common cause of atypical parkinsonism and a rapidly progressive disease that greatly burdens both patients and caregivers. Drugs with disease-modifying potential...

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