Data from FDA (Food and Drug Administration, USA) - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 19 June 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE PRADAXA is a direct thrombin inhibitor indicated: To reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (1.1) For the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for 5-10 days (1.2) To reduce the risk of recurrence of DVT and PE in patients who have been previously treated (1.3) For the prophylaxis of DVT and PE in patients who have undergone hip replacement surgery (1.4) 1.1 Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation PRADAXA is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. 1.2 Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism PRADAXA is indicated for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for 5-10 days. 1.3 Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism PRADAXA is indicated to reduce the risk of recurrence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients who have been previously treated. 1.4 Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Following Hip Replacement Surgery PRADAXA is indicated for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, in patients who have undergone hip replacement surgery.

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contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS PRADAXA is contraindicated in patients with: Active pathological bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Adverse Reactions (6.1)] . History of a serious hypersensitivity reaction to PRADAXA (e.g., anaphylactic reaction or anaphylactic shock) [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)] . Mechanical prosthetic heart valve [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]. Active pathological bleeding (4) History of serious hypersensitivity reaction to PRADAXA (4) Mechanical prosthetic heart valve (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are described elsewhere in the labeling: Increased Risk of Thrombotic Events after Premature Discontinuation [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Risk of Bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia or Puncture [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] Thromboembolic and Bleeding Events in Patients with Prosthetic Heart Valves [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] The most serious adverse reactions reported with PRADAXA were related to bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Most common adverse reactions (>15%) are gastritis-like symptoms and bleeding (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. at (800) 542-6257 or (800) 459-9906 TTY or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch . 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reactions rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation The RE-LY (Randomized Evaluation of Long-term Anticoagulant Therapy) study provided safety information on the use of two doses of PRADAXA and warfarin [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The numbers of patients and their exposures are described in Table 1. Limited information is presented on the 110 mg dosing arm because this dose is not approved. Table 1 Summary of Treatment Exposure in RE-LY PRADAXA 110 mg twice daily PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily Warfarin Total number treated 5983 6059 5998 Exposure > 12 months 4936 4939 5193 > 24 months 2387 2405 2470 Mean exposure (months) 20.5 20.3 21.3 Total patient-years 10,242 10,261 10,659 Drug Discontinuation in RE-LY The rates of adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation were 21% for PRADAXA 150 mg and 16% for warfarin. The most frequent adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of PRADAXA were bleeding and gastrointestinal events (i.e., dyspepsia, nausea, upper abdominal pain, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and diarrhea). Bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Table 2 shows the number of adjudicated major bleeding events during the treatment period in the RE-LY study, with the bleeding rate per 100 subject-years (%). Major bleeding is defined as bleeding accompanied by one or more of the following: a decrease in hemoglobin of ≥2 g/dL, a transfusion of ≥2 units of packed red blood cells, bleeding at a critical site or with a fatal outcome. Intracranial hemorrhage included intracerebral (hemorrhagic stroke), subarachnoid, and subdural bleeds. Table 2 Adjudicated Major Bleeding Events in Treated Patientsa aPatients during treatment or within 2 days of stopping study treatment. Major bleeding events within each subcategory were counted once per patient, but patients may have contributed events to multiple subcategories. bAnnual event rate per 100 pt-years = 100 * number of subjects with event/subject-years. Subject-years is defined as cumulative number of days from first drug intake to event date, date of last drug intake + 2, death date (whatever occurred first) across all treated subjects divided by 365.25. In case of recurrent events of the same category, the first event was considered. cDefined as bleeding accompanied by one or more of the following: a decrease in hemoglobin of ≥2 g/dL, a transfusion of 2 or more units of packed red blood cells, bleeding at a critical site or with fatal outcome. dIntracranial bleed included intracerebral (hemorrhagic stroke), subarachnoid, and subdural bleeds. eOn-treatment analysis based on the safety population, compared to ITT analysis presented in Section 14 Clinical Studies. fFatal bleed: Adjudicated major bleed as defined above with investigator reported fatal outcome and adjudicated death with primary cause from bleeding. gNon-intracranial fatal bleed: Adjudicated major bleed as defined above and adjudicated death with primary cause from bleeding but without symptomatic intracranial bleed based on investigator’s clinical assessment. Event PRADAXA 150 mg N = 6059 n (%/yearb) Warfarin N = 5998 n (%/yearb) PRADAXA 150 mg vs. Warfarin HR (95% CI) Major Bleedingc 350 (3.47) 374 (3.58) 0.97 (0.84, 1.12) Intracranial Hemorrhage (ICH)d 23 (0.22) 82 (0.77) 0.29 (0.18, 0.46) Hemorrhagic Strokee 6 (0.06) 40 (0.37) 0.16 (0.07, 0.37) Other ICH 17 (0.17) 46 (0.43) 0.38 (0.22, 0.67) Gastrointestinal 162 (1.59) 111 (1.05) 1.51 (1.19, 1.92) Fatal Bleedingf 7 (0.07) 16 (0.15) 0.45 (0.19, 1.10) ICH 3 (0.03) 9 (0.08) 0.35 (0.09, 1.28) Non-intracranialg 4 (0.04) 7 (0.07) 0.59 (0.17, 2.02) There was a higher rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg than in patients receiving warfarin (6.6% vs. 4.2%, respectively). The risk of major bleeds was similar with PRADAXA 150 mg and warfarin across major subgroups defined by baseline characteristics (see Figure 1), with the exception of age, where there was a trend towards a higher incidence of major bleeding on PRADAXA (hazard ratio 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0 to 1.5) for patients ≥75 years of age. Figure 1 Adjudicated Major Bleeding by Baseline Characteristics Including Hemorrhagic Stroke Treated Patients Note: The figure above presents effects in various subgroups all of which are baseline characteristics and all of which were pre-specified. The 95% confidence limits that are shown do not take into account how many comparisons were made, nor do they reflect the effect of a particular factor after adjustment for all other factors. Apparent homogeneity or heterogeneity among groups should not be over-interpreted. Figure 1 Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions Patients on PRADAXA 150 mg had an increased incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions (35% vs. 24% on warfarin). These were commonly dyspepsia (including abdominal pain upper, abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort, and epigastric discomfort) and gastritis-like symptoms (including GERD, esophagitis, erosive gastritis, gastric hemorrhage, hemorrhagic gastritis, hemorrhagic erosive gastritis, and gastrointestinal ulcer). Hypersensitivity Reactions In the RE-LY study, drug hypersensitivity (including urticaria, rash, and pruritus), allergic edema, anaphylactic reaction, and anaphylactic shock were reported in <0.1% of patients receiving PRADAXA. Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism PRADAXA was studied in 4387 patients in 4 pivotal, parallel, randomized, double-blind trials. Three of these trials were active-controlled (warfarin) (RE-COVER, RE-COVER II, and RE-MEDY), and one study (RE-SONATE) was placebo-controlled. The demographic characteristics were similar among the 4 pivotal studies and between the treatment groups within these studies. Approximately 60% of the treated patients were male, with a mean age of 55.1 years. The majority of the patients were white (87.7%), 10.3% were Asian, and 1.9% were black with a mean CrCl of 105.6 mL/min. Bleeding events for the 4 pivotal studies were classified as major bleeding events if at least one of the following criteria applied: fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical area or organ (intraocular, intracranial, intraspinal or intramuscular with compartment syndrome, retroperitoneal bleeding, intra-articular bleeding, or pericardial bleeding), bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin level of 2.0 g/dL (1.24 mmol/L or more, or leading to transfusion of 2 or more units of whole blood or red cells). RE-COVER and RE-COVER II studies compared PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily and warfarin for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Patients received 5-10 days of an approved parenteral anticoagulant therapy followed by 6 months, with mean exposure of 164 days, of oral only treatment; warfarin was overlapped with parenteral therapy. Table 3 shows the number of patients experiencing bleeding events in the pooled analysis of RE-COVER and RE-COVER II studies during the full treatment including parenteral and oral only treatment periods after randomization. Table 3 Bleeding Events in RE-COVER and RE-COVER II Treated Patients Note: MBE can belong to more than one criterion. aPatients with at least one MBE. bBleeding site based on investigator assessment. Patients can have more than one site of bleeding. cConfidence interval Bleeding Events-Full Treatment Period Including Parenteral Treatment PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily N (%) Warfarin N (%) Hazard Ratio (95% CI)c Patients N=2553 N=2554 Major bleeding eventa 37 (1.4) 51 (2.0) 0.73 (0.48, 1.11) Fatal bleeding 1 (0.04) 2 (0.1) Bleeding in a critical area or organ 7 (0.3) 15 (0.6) Fall in hemoglobin ≥2 g/dL or transfusion ≥2 units of whole blood or packed red blood cells 32 (1.3) 38 (1.5) Bleeding sites for MBEb Intracranial 2 (0.1) 5 (0.2) Retroperitoneal 2 (0.1) 1 (0.04) Intraarticular 2 (0.1) 4 (0.2) Intramuscular 2 (0.1) 6 (0.2) Gastrointestinal 15 (0.6) 14 (0.5) Urogenital 7 (0.3) 14 (0.5) Other 8 (0.3) 8 (0.3) Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 101 (4.0) 170 (6.7) 0.58 (0.46, 0.75) Any bleeding 411 (16.1) 567 (22.7) 0.70 (0.61, 0.79) The rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg in the full treatment period was 3.1% (2.4% on warfarin). The RE-MEDY and RE-SONATE studies provided safety information on the use of PRADAXA for the reduction in the risk of recurrence of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. RE-MEDY was an active-controlled study (warfarin) in which 1430 patients received PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily following 3 to 12 months of oral anticoagulant regimen. Patients in the treatment studies who rolled over into the RE-MEDY study had a combined treatment duration of up to more than 3 years, with mean exposure of 473 days. Table 4 shows the number of patients experiencing bleeding events in the study. Table 4 Bleeding Events in RE-MEDY Treated Patients Note: MBE can belong to more than one criterion. aPatients with at least one MBE. bBleeding site based on investigator assessment. Patients can have more than one site of bleeding. cConfidence interval PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily N (%) Warfarin N (%) Hazard Ratio (95% CI)c Patients N=1430 N=1426 Major bleeding eventa 13 (0.9) 25 (1.8) 0.54 (0.25, 1.16) Fatal bleeding 0 1 (0.1) Bleeding in a critical area or organ 7 (0.5) 11 (0.8) Fall in hemoglobin ≥2 g/dL or transfusion ≥2 units of whole blood or packed red blood cells 7 (0.5) 16 (1.1) Bleeding sites for MBEb Intracranial 2 (0.1) 4 (0.3) Intraocular 4 (0.3) 2 (0.1) Retroperitoneal 0 1 (0.1) Intraarticular 0 2 (0.1) Intramuscular 0 4 (0.3) Gastrointestinal 4 (0.3) 8 (0.6) Urogenital 1 (0.1) 1 (0.1) Other 2 (0.1) 4 (0.3) Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 71 (5.0) 125 (8.8) 0.56 (0.42, 0.75) Any bleeding 278 (19.4) 373 (26.2) 0.71 (0.61, 0.83) In the RE-MEDY study, the rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg was 3.1% (2.2% on warfarin). RE-SONATE was a placebo-controlled study in which 684 patients received PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily following 6 to 18 months of oral anticoagulant regimen. Patients in the treatment studies who rolled over into the RE-SONATE study had combined treatment duration up to 9 months, with mean exposure of 165 days. Table 5 shows the number of patients experiencing bleeding events in the study. Table 5 Bleeding Events in RE-SONATE Treated Patients Note: MBE can belong to more than one criterion. aPatients with at least one MBE. bBleeding site based on investigator assessment. Patients can have more than one site of bleeding. cConfidence interval PRADAXA 150 mg twice daily N (%) Placebo N (%) Hazard Ratio (95% CI)c Patients N=684 N=659 Major bleeding eventa 2 (0.3) 0 Bleeding in a critical area or organ 0 0 Gastrointestinalb 2 (0.3) 0 Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 34 (5.0) 13 (2.0) 2.54 (1.34, 4.82) Any bleeding 72 (10.5) 40 (6.1) 1.77 (1.20, 2.61) In the RE-SONATE study, the rate of any gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA 150 mg was 0.7% (0.3% on placebo). Clinical Myocardial Infarction Events In the active-controlled VTE studies, a higher rate of clinical myocardial infarction was reported in patients who received PRADAXA [20 (0.66 per 100 patient-years)] than in those who received warfarin [5 (0.17 per 100 patient-years)]. In the placebo-controlled study, a similar rate of non-fatal and fatal clinical myocardial infarction was reported in patients who received PRADAXA [1 (0.32 per 100 patient-years)] and in those who received placebo [1 (0.34 per 100 patient-years)]. Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions In the four pivotal studies, patients on PRADAXA 150 mg had a similar incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions (24.7% vs. 22.7% on warfarin). Dyspepsia (including abdominal pain upper, abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort, and epigastric discomfort) occurred in patients on PRADAXA in 7.5% vs. 5.5% on warfarin, and gastritis-like symptoms (including gastritis, GERD, esophagitis, erosive gastritis and gastric hemorrhage) occurred at 3.0% vs. 1.7%, respectively. Hypersensitivity Reactions In the 4 pivotal studies, drug hypersensitivity (including urticaria, rash, and pruritus), allergic edema, anaphylactic reaction, and anaphylactic shock were reported in 0.1% of patients receiving PRADAXA. Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Following Hip Replacement Surgery PRADAXA was studied in 5476 patients, randomized and treated in two double-blind, active-controlled non-inferiority trials (RE-NOVATE and RE-NOVATE II). The demographic characteristics were similar across the two studies and between the treatment groups within these studies. Approximately 45.3 % of the treated patients were male, with a mean age of 63.2 years. The majority of the patients were white (96.1%), 3.6% were Asian, and 0.3% were black with a mean CrCl of 92 mL/min. Bleeding events for the RE-NOVATE and RE-NOVATE II studies were classified as major bleeding events if at least one of the following criteria applied: fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical area or organ (intraocular, intracranial, intraspinal or retroperitoneal bleeding), bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin level of 2.0 g/dL (1.24 mmol/L) or more, or leading to transfusion of 2 or more units of whole blood or red cells, requiring treatment cessation or leading to re-operation. The RE-NOVATE study compared PRADAXA 75 mg taken orally 1-4 hours after surgery followed by 150 mg once daily, PRADAXA 110 mg taken orally 1-4 hours after surgery followed by 220 mg once daily and subcutaneous enoxaparin 40 mg once daily initiated the evening before surgery for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients who had undergone hip replacement surgery. The RE-NOVATE II study compared PRADAXA 110 mg taken orally 1-4 hours after surgery followed by 220 mg once daily and subcutaneous enoxaparin 40 mg once daily initiated the evening before surgery for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients who had undergone hip replacement surgery. In the RE-NOVATE and RE-NOVATE II studies, patients received 28-35 days of PRADAXA or enoxaparin with median exposure of 33 days. Tables 6 and 7 show the number of patients experiencing bleeding events in the analysis of RE-NOVATE and RE-NOVATE II. Table 6 Bleeding Events in RE-NOVATE Treated Patients PRADAXA 220 mg N (%) Enoxaparin N (%) Patients N=1146 N=1154 Major bleeding event 23 (2.0) 18 (1.6) Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 48 (4.2) 40 (3.5) Any bleeding 141 (12.3) 132 (11.4) Table 7 Bleeding Events in RE-NOVATE II Treated Patients PRADAXA 220 mg N (%) Enoxaparin N (%) Patients N=1010 N=1003 Major bleeding event 14 (1.4) 9 (0.9) Clinically relevant non-major bleeding 26 (2.6) 20 (2.0) Any bleeding 98 (9.7) 83 (8.3) In the two studies, the rate of major gastrointestinal bleeds in patients receiving PRADAXA and enoxaparin was the same (0.1%) and for any gastrointestinal bleeds was 1.4% for PRADAXA 220 mg and 0.9% for enoxaparin. Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions In the two studies, the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions for patients on PRADAXA 220 mg and enoxaparin was 39.5% and 39.5%, respectively. Dyspepsia (including abdominal pain upper, abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort, and epigastric discomfort) occurred in patients on PRADAXA 220 mg in 4.1% vs. 3.8% on enoxaparin, and gastritis-like symptoms (including gastritis, GERD, esophagitis, erosive gastritis and gastric hemorrhage) occurred at 0.6% vs. 1.0%, respectively. Hypersensitivity Reactions In the two studies, drug hypersensitivity (such as urticaria, rash, and pruritus) was reported in 0.3% of patients receiving PRADAXA 220 mg. Clinical Myocardial Infarction Events In the two studies, clinical myocardial infarction was reported in 2 (0.1%) of patients who received PRADAXA 220 mg and 6 (0.3%) of patients who received enoxaparin. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of PRADAXA. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of PRADAXA: angioedema, thrombocytopenia, esophageal ulcer.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation: For patients with CrCl >30 mL/min: 150 mg orally, twice daily (2.1) For patients with CrCl 15-30 mL/min: 75 mg orally, twice daily (2.1) Treatment of DVT and PE: For patients with CrCl >30 mL/min: 150 mg orally, twice daily after 5-10 days of parenteral anticoagulation (2.1) Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT and PE: For patients with CrCl >30 mL/min: 150 mg orally, twice daily after previous treatment (2.1) Prophylaxis of DVT and PE Following Hip Replacement Surgery: For patients with CrCl >30 mL/min: 110 mg orally first day, then 220 mg once daily (2.1) Review recommendations for converting to or from other oral or parenteral anticoagulants (2.4, 2.5) Temporarily discontinue PRADAXA before invasive or surgical procedures when possible, then restart promptly (2.6) 2.1 Recommended Dose Indication Dosage Reduction in Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular AF CrCl >30 mL/min: 150 mg twice daily CrCl 15 to 30 mL/min: 75 mg twice daily CrCl <15 mL/min or on dialysis: Dosing recommendations cannot be provided CrCl 30 to 50 mL/min with concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors: Reduce dose to 75 mg twice daily if given with P-gp inhibitors dronedarone or systemic ketoconazole. CrCl <30 mL/min with concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors: Avoid co-administration Treatment of DVT and PE Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT and PE CrCl >30 mL/min: 150 mg twice daily CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis: Dosing recommendations cannot be provided CrCl <50 mL/min with concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors: Avoid co-administration Prophylaxis of DVT and PE Following Hip Replacement Surgery CrCl >30 mL/min: 110 mg for first day, then 220 mg once daily CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis: Dosing recommendations cannot be provided CrCl <50 mL/min with concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors: Avoid co-administration Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation For patients with creatinine clearance (CrCl) >30 mL/min, the recommended dose of PRADAXA is 150 mg taken orally, twice daily. For patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl 15-30 mL/min), the recommended dose of PRADAXA is 75 mg twice daily [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Dosing recommendations for patients with a CrCl <15 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided. Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism For patients with CrCl >30 mL/min, the recommended dose of PRADAXA is 150 mg taken orally, twice daily, after 5-10 days of parenteral anticoagulation. Dosing recommendations for patients with a CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism For patients with CrCl >30 mL/min, the recommended dose of PRADAXA is 150 mg taken orally, twice daily after previous treatment. Dosing recommendations for patients with a CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Following Hip Replacement Surgery For patients with CrCl >30 mL/min, the recommended dose of PRADAXA is 110 mg taken orally 1-4 hours after surgery and after hemostasis has been achieved, then 220 mg taken once daily for 28-35 days. If PRADAXA is not started on the day of surgery, after hemostasis has been achieved initiate treatment with 220 mg once daily. Dosing recommendations for patients with a CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.2, 12.3)]. 2.2 Dosing Adjustments Assess renal function prior to initiation of treatment with PRADAXA. Periodically assess renal function as clinically indicated (i.e., more frequently in clinical situations that may be associated with a decline in renal function) and adjust therapy accordingly. Discontinue PRADAXA in patients who develop acute renal failure while on PRADAXA and consider alternative anticoagulant therapy. Generally, the extent of anticoagulation does not need to be assessed. When necessary, use aPTT or ECT, and not INR, to assess for anticoagulant activity in patients on PRADAXA [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)]. Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation In patients with moderate renal impairment (CrCl 30-50 mL/min), concomitant use of the P-gp inhibitor dronedarone or systemic ketoconazole can be expected to produce dabigatran exposure similar to that observed in severe renal impairment. Reduce the dose of PRADAXA to 75 mg twice daily [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Dosing recommendations for patients with CrCl ≤30 mL/min cannot be provided. Avoid use of concomitant P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Following Hip Replacement Surgery Dosing recommendations for patients with CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided. Avoid use of concomitant P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.3) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.2, 12.3)]. 2.3 Instructions to Patients Instruct patients to swallow the capsules whole. PRADAXA should be taken with a full glass of water. Breaking, chewing, or emptying the contents of the capsule can result in increased exposure [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)] . If a dose of PRADAXA is not taken at the scheduled time, the dose should be taken as soon as possible on the same day; the missed dose should be skipped if it cannot be taken at least 6 hours before the next scheduled dose. The dose of PRADAXA should not be doubled to make up for a missed dose. 2.4 Converting from or to Warfarin When converting patients from warfarin therapy to PRADAXA, discontinue warfarin and start PRADAXA when the INR is below 2.0. When converting from PRADAXA to warfarin, adjust the starting time of warfarin based on creatinine clearance as follows: For CrCl ≥50 mL/min, start warfarin 3 days before discontinuing PRADAXA. For CrCl 30-50 mL/min, start warfarin 2 days before discontinuing PRADAXA. For CrCl 15-30 mL/min, start warfarin 1 day before discontinuing PRADAXA. For CrCl <15 mL/min, no recommendations can be made. Because PRADAXA can increase INR, the INR will better reflect warfarin’s effect only after PRADAXA has been stopped for at least 2 days [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)] . 2.5 Converting from or to Parenteral Anticoagulants For patients currently receiving a parenteral anticoagulant, start PRADAXA 0 to 2 hours before the time that the next dose of the parenteral drug was to have been administered or at the time of discontinuation of a continuously administered parenteral drug (e.g., intravenous unfractionated heparin). For patients currently taking PRADAXA, wait 12 hours (CrCl ≥30 mL/min) or 24 hours (CrCl <30 mL/min) after the last dose of PRADAXA before initiating treatment with a parenteral anticoagulant [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)] . 2.6 Discontinuation for Surgery and Other Interventions If possible, discontinue PRADAXA 1 to 2 days (CrCl ≥50 mL/min) or 3 to 5 days (CrCl <50 mL/min) before invasive or surgical procedures because of the increased risk of bleeding. Consider longer times for patients undergoing major surgery, spinal puncture, or placement of a spinal or epidural catheter or port, in whom complete hemostasis may be required [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)] . If surgery cannot be delayed, there is an increased risk of bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] . This risk of bleeding should be weighed against the urgency of intervention [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.3)] . Use a specific reversal agent (idarucizumab) in case of emergency surgery or urgent procedures when reversal of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran is needed. Refer to the idarucizumab prescribing information for additional information. Restart PRADAXA as soon as medically appropriate.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Lactation: Breastfeeding not recommended. (8.2) Geriatric use: Risk of bleeding increases with age (8.5) 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary The limited available data on PRADAXA use in pregnant women are insufficient to determine drug-associated risks for adverse developmental outcomes. There are risks to the mother associated with untreated venous thromboembolism in pregnancy and a risk of hemorrhage in the mother and fetus associated with the use of anticoagulants (see Clinical Considerations). In pregnant rats treated from implantation until weaning, dabigatran increased the number of dead offspring and caused excess vaginal/uterine bleeding close to parturition at an exposure 2.6 times the human exposure. At a similar exposure, dabigatran decreased the number of implantations when rats were treated prior to mating and up to implantation (gestation Day 6). Dabigatran administered to pregnant rats and rabbits during organogenesis up to exposures 8 and 13 times the human exposure, respectively, did not induce major malformations. However, the incidence of delayed or irregular ossification of fetal skull bones and vertebrae was increased in the rat (see Data). The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk Pregnancy confers an increased risk for thromboembolism that is higher for women with underlying thromboembolic disease and certain high-risk pregnancy conditions. Published data describe that women with a previous history of venous thrombosis are at high risk for recurrence during pregnancy. Fetal/Neonatal adverse reaction Use of anticoagulants, including PRADAXA, may increase the risk of bleeding in the fetus and neonate. Monitor neonates for bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Labor or delivery All patients receiving anticoagulants, including pregnant women, are at risk for bleeding. PRADAXA use during labor or delivery in women who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia may result in epidural or spinal hematomas. Consider discontinuation or use of shorter acting anticoagulant as delivery approaches [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2, 5.3)]. Data Animal Data Dabigatran has been shown to decrease the number of implantations when male and female rats were treated at a dosage of 70 mg/kg (about 2.6 to 3.0 times the human exposure at MRHD of 300 mg/day based on area under the curve [AUC] comparisons) prior to mating and up to implantation (gestation Day 6). Treatment of pregnant rats after implantation with dabigatran at the same dose increased the number of dead offspring and caused excess vaginal/uterine bleeding close to parturition. Dabigatran administered to pregnant rats and rabbits during organogenesis up to maternally toxic doses of 200 mg/kg (8 and 13 times the human exposure, respectively, at a MRHD of 300 mg/day based on AUC comparisons) did not induce major malformations, but increased the incidence of delayed or irregular ossification of fetal skull bones and vertebrae in the rat. Death of offspring and mother rats during labor in association with uterine bleeding occurred during treatment of pregnant rats from implantation (gestation Day 7) to weaning (lactation Day 21) with dabigatran at a dose of 70 mg/kg (about 2.6 times the human exposure at MRHD of 300 mg/day based on AUC comparisons). 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There are no data on the presence of dabigatran in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or on milk production. Dabigatran and/or its metabolites were present in rat milk. Breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment with PRADAXA. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of PRADAXA in pediatric patients have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Of the total number of patients in the RE-LY study, 82% were 65 and over, while 40% were 75 and over. The risk of stroke and bleeding increases with age, but the risk-benefit profile is favorable in all age groups [see Warnings and Precautions (5), Adverse Reactions (6.1), and Clinical Studies (14.1)]. 8.6 Renal Impairment Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation No dose adjustment of PRADAXA is recommended in patients with mild or moderate renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Reduce the dose of PRADAXA in patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl 15-30 mL/min) [see Dosage and Administration (2.1, 2.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Dosing recommendations for patients with CrCl <15 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided. Adjust dose appropriately in patients with renal impairment receiving concomitant P-gp inhibitors [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.1), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl ≤30 mL/min) were excluded from RE-COVER. Dosing recommendations for patients with CrCl ≤30 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided. Avoid use of PRADAXA with concomitant P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.2), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Following Hip Replacement Surgery Patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl <30 mL/min) were excluded from RE-NOVATE and RE-NOVATE II. Dosing recommendations for patients with CrCl <30 mL/min or on dialysis cannot be provided. Avoid use of PRADAXA with concomitant P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Drug Interactions (7.3) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.2, 12.3)].

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS P-gp inducers rifampin: Avoid coadministration with PRADAXA (5.5) P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl 30-50 mL/min: Reduce dose or avoid (7) P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <30 mL/min: Not recommended (7) 7.1 Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Non-valvular Atrial Fibrillation The concomitant use of PRADAXA with P-gp inducers (e.g., rifampin) reduces exposure to dabigatran and should generally be avoided [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. P-gp inhibition and impaired renal function are the major independent factors that result in increased exposure to dabigatran [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Concomitant use of P-gp inhibitors in patients with renal impairment is expected to produce increased exposure of dabigatran compared to that seen with either factor alone. In patients with moderate renal impairment (CrCl 30-50 mL/min), reduce the dose of PRADAXA to 75 mg twice daily when administered concomitantly with the P-gp inhibitors dronedarone or systemic ketoconazole. The use of the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, amiodarone, quinidine, clarithromycin, and ticagrelor does not require a dose adjustment of PRADAXA. These results should not be extrapolated to other P-gp inhibitors [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Use in Specific Populations (8.6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. The concomitant use of PRADAXA and P-gp inhibitors in patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl 15-30 mL/min) should be avoided [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Use in Specific Populations (8.6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.2 Treatment and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Avoid use of PRADAXA and P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Use in Specific Populations (8.6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.3 Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism Following Hip Replacement Surgery In patients with CrCl ≥50 mL/min who have concomitant administration of P-gp inhibitors such as dronedarone or systemic ketoconazole, it may be helpful to separate the timing of administration of dabigatran and the P-gp inhibitor by several hours. The concomitant use of PRADAXA and P-gp inhibitors in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min should be avoided [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5), Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.2, 12.3)].

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA022512
Agency product number SC7NUW5IIT
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 0597-0360,0597-0108,0597-0135,0597-0355,0597-0149
Date First Approved 19-10-2010
Date Last Revised 23-03-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
Marketing authorisation holder Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Warnings WARNING: (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS, and (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including PRADAXA, increases the risk of thrombotic events. If anticoagulation with PRADAXA is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy, consider coverage with another anticoagulant [see Dosage and Administration (2.4, 2.5, 2.6) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA Epidural or spinal hematomas may occur in patients treated with PRADAXA who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. These hematomas may result in long-term or permanent paralysis. Consider these risks when scheduling patients for spinal procedures. Factors that can increase the risk of developing epidural or spinal hematomas in these patients include: • use of indwelling epidural catheters • concomitant use of other drugs that affect hemostasis, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), platelet inhibitors, other anticoagulants • a history of traumatic or repeated epidural or spinal punctures • a history of spinal deformity or spinal surgery • optimal timing between the administration of PRADAXA and neuraxial procedures is not known [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. Monitor patients frequently for signs and symptoms of neurological impairment. If neurological compromise is noted, urgent treatment is necessary [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. Consider the benefits and risks before neuraxial intervention in patients anticoagulated or to be anticoagulated [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. WARNING: (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS, and (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF PRADAXA INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS: Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including PRADAXA, increases the risk of thrombotic events. To reduce this risk, consider coverage with another anticoagulant if PRADAXA is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy (2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 5.1). (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA: Epidural or spinal hematomas may occur in patients treated with PRADAXA who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. These hematomas may result in long-term or permanent paralysis (5.3). Monitor patients frequently for signs and symptoms of neurological impairment and if observed, treat urgently. Consider the benefits and risks before neuraxial intervention in patients who are or who need to be anticoagulated (5.3).