Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 05 September 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE ENTYVIO is an integrin receptor antagonist indicated for: Adult Ulcerative Colitis (UC) (1.1) •Adult patients with moderately to severely active UC who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids: •inducing and maintaining clinical response •inducing and maintaining clinical remission •improving endoscopic appearance of the mucosa •achieving corticosteroid-free remission Adult Crohn's Disease (CD) (1.2) •Adult patients with moderately to severely active CD who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a TNF blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids: •achieving clinical response •achieving clinical remission •achieving corticosteroid-free remission 1.1 Adult Ulcerative Colitis ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) is indicated for: •inducing and maintaining clinical response, •inducing and maintaining clinical remission, •improving the endoscopic appearance of the mucosa, and •achieving corticosteroid-free remission in adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids. 1.2 Adult Crohn's Disease ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) is indicated for: •achieving clinical response, •achieving clinical remission, and •achieving corticosteroid-free remission in adult patients with moderately to severely active Crohn's disease who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids.

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS ENTYVIO is contraindicated in patients who have had a known serious or severe hypersensitivity reaction to ENTYVIO or any of its excipients (such as dyspnea, bronchospasm, urticaria, flushing, rash and increased heart rate) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) and Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Patients who have had a known serious or severe hypersensitivity reaction to ENTYVIO or any of its excipients. (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following topics are also discussed in detail in the Warnings and Precautions section: •Infusion-Related Reactions and Hypersensitivity Reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Infections [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] •Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] •Liver Injury [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] Most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥3% and ≥1% higher than placebo): nasopharyngitis, headache, arthralgia, nausea, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, fatigue, cough, bronchitis, influenza, back pain, rash, pruritus, sinusitis, oropharyngeal pain, and pain in extremities. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Takeda Pharmaceuticals at 1-877-TAKEDA-7 (1-877-825-3327) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The data described below reflect exposure to ENTYVIO in 3,326 patients and healthy volunteers in clinical trials, including 1,396 exposed for greater than one year, and 835 exposed for greater than two years. The safety data described in Table 2 are derived from four controlled Phase 3 trials (UC Trials I and II, and CD Trials I and III); data from patients receiving open-label ENTYVIO treatment at Weeks 0 and 2 (prior to entry into UC Trial II and CD Trial III) and from Weeks 6 to 52 (non-responders at Week 6 of UC Trial I and CD Trial I) are included [see Clinical Studies (14.1 and 14.2)]. In these trials, 1,434 patients received ENTYVIO 300 mg for up to 52 weeks, and 297 patients received placebo for up to 52 weeks. Of these, 769 patients had ulcerative colitis and 962 patients had Crohn's disease. Patients were exposed for a mean duration of 259 days (UC Trials I and II) and 247 days (CD Trials I and III). Adverse reactions were reported in 52% of patients treated with ENTYVIO and 45% of patients treated with placebo (UC Trials I and II: 49% with ENTYVIO and 37% with placebo; CD Trials I and III: 55% with ENTYVIO and 47% with placebo). Serious adverse reactions were reported in 7% of patients treated with ENTYVIO compared to 4% of patients treated with placebo (UC Trials I and II: 8% with ENTYVIO and 7% with placebo; CD Trials I and III: 12% with ENTYVIO and 9%, with placebo). The most common adverse reactions (reported by ≥3% of patients treated with ENTYVIO in the UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III combined group and ≥1% higher than in combined placebo group) were nasopharyngitis, headache, arthralgia, nausea, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, fatigue, cough, bronchitis, influenza, back pain, rash, pruritus, sinusitis, oropharyngeal pain and pain in extremities (Table 2). Table 2. Adverse Reactions in ≥3% of ENTYVIO-treated Patients and ≥1% Higher than in Placebo (UC Trials I and II Data from patients receiving open-label ENTYVIO treatment at Weeks 0 and 2 (prior to entry into UC Trial II and CD Trial III) and from Weeks 6 to 52 (non-responders at Week 6 of UC Trial I and CD Trial I) are included. and CD Trials I and III ) Adverse Reaction ENTYVIO Patients who received ENTYVIO for up to 52 weeks. (N=1434) Placebo Patients who received placebo for up to 52 weeks. (N=297) Nasopharyngitis 13% 7% Headache 12% 11% Arthralgia 12% 10% Nausea 9% 8% Pyrexia 9% 7% Upper respiratory tract infection 7% 6% Fatigue 6% 3% Cough 5% 3% Bronchitis 4% 3% Influenza 4% 2% Back pain 4% 3% Rash 3% 2% Pruritus 3% 1% Sinusitis 3% 1% Oropharyngeal pain 3% 1% Pain in extremities 3% 1% Safety data for patients (n=279) in UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III who received ENTYVIO at Weeks 0 and 2 and were then randomized to placebo at Week 6 for up to 52 weeks, and for patients (n=416) in CD Trial II, a 10 week Crohn's disease trial, are similar to those listed in Table 2. Infusion-Related Reactions and Hypersensitivity Reactions Serious infusion-related reactions and hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have been reported following ENTYVIO administration in clinical trials [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. In UC Trials I and II and Crohn's Trials I and III, one case of anaphylaxis [one out of 1434 patients treated with ENTYVIO (0.07%)] was reported by a Crohn's disease patient during the second infusion (symptoms reported were dyspnea, bronchospasm, urticaria, flushing, rash and increased blood pressure and heart rate) and was managed with discontinuation of infusion and treatment with antihistamine and intravenous hydrocortisone. In UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III, 4% of patients treated with ENTYVIO and 3% of patients treated with placebo experienced an infusion-related reaction (IRR). The most frequently observed IRR in the patients treated with ENTYVIO (reported more than twice) were nausea, headache, pruritus, dizziness, fatigue, infusion-related reaction, pyrexia, urticaria and vomiting (each of these adverse reactions occurred in <1% in all patients treated with ENTYVIO) and no individual adverse reaction reported occurred at a rate above 1%. These reactions generally occurred within the first two hours after the infusion and resolved with no treatment or following antihistamine and/or IV hydrocortisone treatment. Less than 1% of patients treated with ENTYVIO had IRRs assessed by the investigator as severe, and IRRs requiring discontinuation of study treatment occurred in <1%. In clinical trials, for patients with mild IRRs or hypersensitivity reactions, physicians were allowed to pretreat with standard medical treatment (e.g., antihistamine, hydrocortisone and/or acetaminophen) prior to next infusion. Infections In UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III, the rate of infections was 0.85 per patient-year in the patients treated with ENTYVIO and 0.7 per patient-year in the patients treated with placebo [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2 )]. The infections consisted primarily of nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, sinusitis, and urinary tract infection. Two percent of patients discontinued ENTYVIO due to infections. In UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III, the rate of serious infections was 0.07 per patient-year in patients treated with ENTYVIO and 0.06 per patient-year in patients treated with placebo. Serious infections were more common in Crohn's disease patients than ulcerative colitis patients, and anal abscesses were the most frequently reported serious adverse reaction in Crohn's disease patients. Over 48 months, there was no increase in the rate of serious infections. In controlled- and open-label long-term extension trials in adults treated with ENTYVIO, serious infections have been reported, including anal abscess, sepsis (some fatal), tuberculosis, salmonella sepsis, Listeria meningitis, giardiasis and cytomegaloviral colitis. In UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III, sepsis, including bacterial sepsis and septic shock, was reported in four of 1434 (0.3%) patients treated with ENTYVIO and in two of 297 patients treated with placebo (0.7%). During these trials, two Crohn's disease patients treated with ENTYVIO died due to reported sepsis or septic shock; both of these patients had significant comorbidities and a complicated hospital course that contributed to the deaths. In an open label long-term extension trial, additional cases of sepsis (some fatal), including bacterial sepsis and septic shock, were reported. The rate of sepsis in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease receiving ENTYVIO was two per 1000 patient-years. In clinical trials, all patients were screened for tuberculosis. One case of latent, pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed during the controlled trials with ENTYVIO. Additional cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were diagnosed during the open-label trial. All of these observed cases occurred outside the United States, and none of the patients had extrapulmonary manifestations. Liver Injury There have been reports of elevations of transaminase and/or bilirubin in patients receiving ENTYVIO [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]. In UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III, three patients reported serious adverse reactions of hepatitis, manifested as elevated transaminases with or without elevated bilirubin and symptoms consistent with hepatitis (e.g., malaise, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, anorexia). These adverse reactions occurred following two to five ENTYVIO doses; however, based on case report information it is unclear if the reactions indicated drug-induced or autoimmune etiology. All patients recovered following discontinuation of therapy with some requiring corticosteroid treatment. In controlled trials, the incidence of ALT and AST elevations ≥3 x ULN was <2% in patients treated with ENTYVIO and in patients treated with placebo. In the open-label trial, one additional case of serious hepatitis was observed. Malignancies In UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III, malignancies (excluding dysplasia and basal cell carcinoma) were reported in six of 1434 (0.4%) patients treated with ENTYVIO, including colon cancer (n=2), transitional cell carcinoma (n=1), breast cancer (n=1), carcinoid tumor of the appendix (n=1) and squamous cell carcinoma (n=1). Malignancy was reported in one of 297 (0.3%) patients treated with placebo (squamous cell carcinoma). Malignancies (excluding dysplasia and basal cell carcinoma) observed during the ongoing open-label long-term extension trial included B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer, colon cancer, malignant hepatic neoplasm, malignant lung neoplasm, malignant melanoma, lung cancer of primary neuroendocrine carcinoma, renal cancer and squamous cell carcinoma. Overall, the number of malignancies in the clinical trials was small; however, long-term exposure was limited. Live and Oral Vaccines There are no data on the secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines in patients receiving ENTYVIO. In a placebo-controlled study of healthy volunteers, 61 subjects were given a single ENTYVIO 750 mg dose (2.5 times the recommended dose), and 62 subjects received placebo followed by intramuscular vaccination with Hepatitis B surface antigen and oral cholera vaccine. After intramuscular vaccination with three doses of recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen, those treated with ENTYVIO did not have lower rates of protective immunity to Hepatitis B virus. However, those exposed to ENTYVIO did have lower seroconversion rates and anti-cholera titers relative to placebo after receiving the two doses of a killed, oral cholera vaccine. The impact on other oral vaccines and on nasal vaccines in patients is unknown. 6.2 Immunogenicity As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors, including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to vedolizumab in the studies described below with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading. In UC Trials I and II and CD Trials I and III, in patients who received ENTYVIO, the frequency of antibodies detected in patients was 13% at 24 weeks after the last dose of study drug (greater than five half-lives after last dose). During treatment, 56 of 1434 (4%) of patients treated with ENTYVIO had detectable anti-vedolizumab antibody at any time during the 52 weeks of continuous treatment. Nine of 56 patients were persistently positive (at two or more study visits) for anti-vedolizumab antibody and 33 of 56 patients developed neutralizing antibodies to vedolizumab. Among eight of these nine subjects with persistently positive anti-vedolizumab antibody and available vedolizumab concentration data, six had undetectable and two had reduced vedolizumab concentrations [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. None of the nine subjects with persistently positive anti-vedolizumab antibody achieved clinical remission at Weeks 6 or 52 in the controlled trials.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION •Recommended dosage in UC and CD: 300 mg infused intravenously over approximately 30 minutes at zero, two and six weeks, then every eight weeks thereafter. (2.3) •Discontinue ENTYVIO in patients who do not show evidence of therapeutic benefit by Week 14. (2.3) •Reconstitute ENTYVIO lyophilized powder with Sterile Water for Injection and dilute in 250 mL of sterile 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection or sterile Lactated Ringer's Injection prior to administration. See Full Prescribing Information for complete reconstitution, dilution and storage instructions. (2.4) •Bring patients up to date with all immunizations (according to current immunization guidelines) before initiating treatment with ENTYVIO. (2.2) 2.1 Important Preparation and Administration Instructions Administer ENTYVIO as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes. Do not administer as an intravenous push or bolus. Reconstitute ENTYVIO lyophilized powder with Sterile Water for Injection and dilute in 250 mL of sterile 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection or sterile Lactated Ringer's Injection prior to administration [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)]. After the infusion is complete, flush with 30 mL of sterile 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection or sterile Lactated Ringer's Injection. ENTYVIO should be administered by a healthcare professional prepared to manage hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis, if they occur [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Appropriate monitoring and medical support measures should be available for immediate use. Observe patients during infusion and until the infusion is complete. 2.2 Prior to Administration of ENTYVIO Prior to initiating treatment with ENTYVIO, all patients should be brought up to date with all immunizations according to current immunization guidelines. 2.3 Dosage in Adults with Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn's Disease The recommended dosage of ENTYVIO in adults with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease is 300 mg administered by intravenous infusion at zero, two and six weeks and then every eight weeks thereafter. Discontinue therapy in patients who show no evidence of therapeutic benefit by Week 14. 2.4 Reconstitution and Dilution Instructions Reconstitution Instructions Remove the flip-off cap from the single-dose vial and wipe with alcohol swab. Reconstitute ENTYVIO vial containing lyophilized powder with 4.8 mL of Sterile Water for injection at room temperature (20° to 25°C [68° to 77°F]), using a syringe with a 21- to 25- gauge needle. Insert the syringe needle into the vial through the center of the stopper and direct the stream of Sterile Water for Injection to the glass wall of the vial to avoid excessive foaming. Gently swirl the vial for at least 15 seconds to dissolve the lyophilized powder. Do not vigorously shake or invert. Allow the solution to sit for up to 20 minutes at room temperature to allow for reconstitution and for any foam to settle; the vial can be swirled and inspected for dissolution during this time. If not fully dissolved after 20 minutes, allow another 10 minutes for dissolution. Do not use the vial if the drug product is not dissolved within 30 minutes. Visually inspect the reconstituted ENTYVIO solution for particulate matter and discoloration prior to dilution. Solution should be clear or opalescent, colorless to light brownish yellow and free of visible particulates. Do not administer reconstituted solution showing uncharacteristic color or containing particulates. Once dissolved, gently invert vial three times. Immediately, withdraw 5 mL (300 mg) of reconstituted ENTYVIO solution using a syringe with a 21- to 25- gauge needle. Discard any remaining portion of the reconstituted solution in the vial. Dilution Instructions Add the 5 mL (300 mg) of reconstituted ENTYVIO solution to 250 mL of sterile 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection or Lactated Ringer's Injection and gently mix the infusion bag. Do not add other medicinal products to the prepared infusion solution or intravenous infusion set. Once reconstituted and diluted, use the infusion solution as soon as possible. Discard any unused portion of the infusion solution . Storage Specific storage conditions and timing for the reconstituted solution in vial and diluted solution in the infusion bag are outlined in Table 1. Do not freeze the reconstituted solution in the vial or the diluted solution in the infusion bag. Table 1: Storage Instructions Storage Condition Refrigeration (2° to 8°C [36° to 46°F]) Room temperature (20° to 25°C [68° to 77°F]) Reconstituted Solution (in Sterile Water for Injection inside vial) 8 hours Use immediately after reconstitution Diluted Solution (in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection) 24 hoursThis time assumes the reconstituted solution is immediately diluted in the 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection or Lactated Ringer's Injection and held in the infusion bag only. Any time that the reconstituted solution was held in vial should be subtracted from the time the solution may be held in the infusion bag.,This period may include up to 12 hours at room temperature (20° to 25°C [68° to 77°F]). 12 hours Diluted Solution (in Lactated Ringer's Injection) 6 hours Use immediately after dilution The combined storage time of reconstituted ENTYVIO solution in the vial and the diluted solution in the infusion bag with 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection is a total of 12 hours at room temperature (20° to 25°C [68° to 77°F]) or 24 hours refrigerated (2° to 8°C [36° to 46°F]). This combined storage time may include up to eight hours of the reconstituted solution in the vial at 2° to 8°C. The combined storage time of reconstituted ENTYVIO solution in the vial and the diluted solution in the infusion bag with Lactated Ringer's Injection is a total of six hours refrigerated (2° to 8°C [36° to 46°F]).
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Exposure Registry There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to ENTYVIO during pregnancy. Information about the registry can be obtained by calling 1-877-TAKEDA7 (1-877-825-3327). Pregnancy Category B: Risk Summary There are no studies with ENTYVIO in pregnant women. No fetal harm was observed in animal reproduction studies with intravenous administration of vedolizumab to rabbits and monkeys at dose levels 20 times the recommended human dosage. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if the benefits to the mother outweigh the risk to the unborn child. Clinical Considerations Any adverse pregnancy effect from ENTYVIO would likely be greater during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Monoclonal antibodies are transported across the placenta in a linear fashion as pregnancy progresses, with the largest amount transferred during the third trimester. Animal Data A reproduction study has been performed in pregnant rabbits at single intravenous doses up to 100 mg/kg administered on gestation Day 7 (about 20 times the recommended human dosage) and has revealed no evidence of impaired fertility or harm to the fetus due to vedolizumab. A pre- and post-natal development study in monkeys showed no evidence of any adverse effect on pre- and post-natal development at intravenous doses up to 100 mg/kg (about 20 times the recommended human dosage). 8.3 Nursing Mothers It is unknown whether vedolizumab is present in human milk. Vedolizumab was detected in the milk of lactating monkeys. Exercise caution when administering vedolizumab to a nursing woman. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of ENTYVIO in pediatric patients have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Clinical trials of ENTYVIO did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over (46 Crohn's and ulcerative colitis patients aged 65 and over were treated with ENTYVIO during controlled Phase 3 trials) to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. However, no overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients.
Pregnancy and lactation
8.3 Nursing Mothers It is unknown whether vedolizumab is present in human milk. Vedolizumab was detected in the milk of lactating monkeys. Exercise caution when administering vedolizumab to a nursing woman.

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS 7.1 Natalizumab Because of the potential for increased risk of PML and other infections, avoid the concomitant use of ENTYVIO with natalizumab. 7.2 TNF Blockers Because of the potential for increased risk of infections, avoid the concomitant use of ENTYVIO with TNF blockers. 7.3 Live Vaccines Live vaccines may be administered concurrently with ENTYVIO only if the benefits outweigh the risks [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number BLA125476
Agency product number 9RV78Q2002
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 64764-300
Date Last Revised 23-02-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 1538137
Marketing authorisation holder Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.