Pancreas

Pancreas transplants are frequently combined with kidney transplantation. Data from the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR) showed that for diabetic patients in the US who received a pancreas transplant:

  • 75% of pancreas transplants were combined with kidney transplants
  • 18% of pancreas transplants were performed after a previous kidney transplantation
  • 7% of pancreases were transplanted alone (Gruessner, 2011).

Early pancreas graft failure rates (within 90 days post transplantation) for all transplantation groups was 7.8% in 2014–2015, reduced from 11.7% in 2004–2005 (Kandaswamy et al., 2017).

The figure below shows acute graft failure in pancreas transplant alone (PTA), pancreas after kidney (PAK), simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK), and SPK followed by pancreas alone (SPK-PA) or kidney alone (SPK-KI) (Kandaswamy et al., 2017).

Acute graft failure following pancreas transplantation (for transplants up to September 2015) (Kandaswamy et al., 2017).

Figure 8: Acute graft failure following pancreas transplantation (for transplants up to September 2015) (Kandaswamy et al., 2017).
Key: PTA, pancreas transplant alone; PAK, pancreas after kidney; SPK, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation; SPK-PA, simultaneous pancreas-kidney + pancreas alone; SPK-KI, simultaneous pancreas-kidney + kidney alone.

All-cause kidney graft survival in SPK was 96%, 81%, and 66% at 1, 5 and 10 years respectively (Kandaswamy et al., 2017).

Pancreas transplantation following graft failure of allo-islet transplantation (pancreas after allo-islet transplantation (PAI)) in 40 US patients showed 97% patient survival, and 84% pancreas survival at 1 year; and 83% patient survival, 65% pancreas survival 5 years post pancreas transplantation (Gruessner and Gruessner, 2016).