Central sleep apnea (CSA)

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is characterised by repeated episodes of airflow reduction or interruption due to short decreases or pauses in central ventilatory drive during sleep (Randerath et al., 2017). While it has lower prevalence in the general population than obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), it is overrepresented in specific subpopulations including patients with heart failure, a history of stroke, those receiving opioid medications or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Visit different sections of the Sleep Apnea Learning Zone to find out about the incidence of CSA, its pathophysiology, symptoms and diagnosis and current treatment options.

Central sleep apnea symptoms and diagnosis

Central sleep apnea symptoms and diagnosis

Learn how to distinguish central from obstructive sleep apnea and the specific polysomnographic patterns associated with central sleep apnea.

Current central sleep apnea treatment options

Current central sleep apnea treatment options

Recommended treatment options for central sleep apnea (CSA) vary depending on the aetiology of the pathology. Learn what is available in the current CSA treatment landscape to help patients.

Central sleep apnea epidemiology

Central sleep apnea epidemiology

Get an overview of the epidemiology of central sleep apnea and find out about the specific subpopulations affected.

Central sleep apnea pathophysiology

Central sleep apnea pathophysiology

What causes central sleep apnea? Learn more about the central events that contribute to instability of the breathing pattern.