Data from Pharmawand - Curated by Marshall Pearce - Date added 06 December 2017

Switching to Tresiba from another basal insulin benefits people with diabetes regardless of whether or not their blood sugar levels are controlled. This is the conclusion of a post-hoc analysis of data from the EU-TREAT study collected in a real-world clinical setting among people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

In people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar levels were controlled (HbA1c <7.5%) with basal insulin prior to switching, Tresiba significantly reduced the rate of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels) while maintaining blood sugar control. Results showed a 67% reduction in the rate of hypoglycaemic events over six months after switching to Tresiba, with an 11% lower dose of insulin. In patients with uncontrolled type 1 or type 2 diabetes, switching to Tresiba resulted in significantly improved glycaemic control without an increase in the risk of hypoglycaemia or insulin dose. These results were sustained for up to 12 months after switching from another basal insulin, mainly insulin glargine U100 and insulin detemir.

In people with type 1 diabetes whose blood sugar levels were controlled, a 16% lower rate of hypoglycaemia was observed over six months, and blood sugar control was maintained with a 13% lower dose of insulin. This confirms that the benefits of Tresiba seen in clinical trials are being reproduced in clinical practice.

The main results of the EU-TREAT real-world evidence study reported earlier this year showed that that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes experienced a significant reduction in HbA1c six months after switching to Tresiba . Rates of overall hypoglycaemia were also significantly lower at six months after switching to Tresiba. In people with type 1 diabetes, the rate of severe hypoglycaemia was reduced by 85% and by 92% in people with type 2 diabetes. Similar reductions were seen at 12 months.

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