Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 01 June 2018

Indication(s)

INDICATIONS AND USAGE 1. Indications Progestin-only oral contraceptives are indicated for the prevention of pregnancy. 2. Efficacy If used perfectly, the first-year failure rate for progestin-only oral contraceptives is 0.5%. However, the typical failure rate is estimated to be closer to 5%, due to late or omitted pills. The following table lists the pregnancy rates for users of all major methods of contraception. Table 2: Percentage of Women Experiencing an Unintended Pregnancy During the First Year of Typical Use and the First Year of Perfect Use of Contraception and the Percentage Continuing Use at the End of the First Year. United States. % of Women Experiencing an Unintended Pregnancy within the First Year of Use % of Women Continuing Use at One Year3 Method (1) Typical Use1 (2) Perfect Use2 (3) (4) Chance4 85 85 Spermicides5 26 6 40 Periodic abstinence 25 63 Calendar 9 Ovulation Method 3 Sympto-Thermal6 2 Post-Ovulation 1 Cap7 Parous Women 40 26 42 Nulliparous Women 20 9 56 Sponge Parous Women 40 20 42 Nulliparous Women 20 9 56 Diaphragm7 20 6 56 Withdrawal 19 4 Condom8 Female (Reality) 21 5 56 Male 14 3 61 Pill 5 71 Progestin only 0.5 Combined 0.1 IUDs Progesterone T 2 1.5 81 Copper T380A 0.8 0.6 78 LNg20 0.1 0.1 81 Depo-Provera® 0.3 0.3 70 Levonorgestrel Implants (Norplant®) 0.05 0.05 88 Female Sterilization 0.5 0.5 100 Male Sterilization 0.15 0.1 100 Emergency Contraceptive Pills Treatment initiated within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse reduces the risk of pregnancy by at least 75%.9 Lactational Amenorrhea Method LAM is a highly effective, temporary method of contraception.10 Source: Trussell, J, Contraceptive Efficacy. In: Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Stewart F, Cates W, Stewart GK, Kowal D, Guest F, Contraceptive Technology: Seventeenth Revised Edition. New York NY: Irvington Publishers, 1998. Among typical couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time), the percentage who experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any reason. Among couples who initiate use of a method (not necessarily for the first time), and who use it perfectly (both consistently and correctly), the percentage who experience an accidental pregnancy during the first year if they do not stop use for any other reason. Among couples attempting to avoid pregnancy, the percentage who continue to use a method for one year. The percentage of women becoming pregnant noted in columns (2) and (3) are based on data from populations where contraception is not used and from women who cease using contraception in order to become pregnant. Among such populations, about 89% become pregnant within one year. This estimate was lowered slightly (to 85%) to represent the percentage that would become pregnant within one year among women now relying on reversible methods of contraception if they abandoned contraception altogether. Foams, creams, gels, vaginal suppositories, and vaginal film. Cervical mucus (ovulation) method supplemented by calendar in the pre-ovulatory and basal body temperature in the post-ovulatory phases. With spermicidal cream or jelly. Without spermicides. The treatment schedule is one dose within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse, and a second dose 12 hours after the first dose. The Food and Drug Administration has declared the following brands of oral contraceptives to be safe and effective for emergency contraception: Ovral® (1 dose is 2 white pills), Alesse® (1 dose is 5 pink pills), Nordette® or Levlen® (1 dose is 4 yellow pills). However, to maintain effective protection against pregnancy, another method of contraception must be used as soon as menstruation resumes, the frequency or duration of breastfeeds is reduced, bottle feeds are introduced, or the baby reaches 6 months of age.

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Advisory information

contraindications
CONTRAINDICATIONS Progestin-only oral contraceptives (POPs) should not be used by women who currently have the following conditions: Known or suspected pregnancy Known or suspected carcinoma of the breast Undiagnosed abnormal genital bleeding Hypersensitivity to any component of this product Benign or malignant liver tumors Acute liver disease
Special warnings and precautions
PRECAUTIONS 1 . General Patients should be counseled that oral contraceptives do not protect against transmission of HIV (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) such as Chlamydia, genital herpes, genital warts, gonorrhea, hepatitis B, and syphilis. 2. Physical Examination and Followup It is considered good medical practice for sexually active women using oral contraceptives to have annual history and physical examinations. The physical examination may be deferred until after initiation of oral contraceptives if requested by the woman and judged appropriate by the clinician. 3. Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Some users may experience slight deterioration in glucose tolerance, with increases in plasma insulin, but women with diabetes mellitus who use progestin-only oral contraceptives do not generally experience changes in their insulin requirements. Nonetheless, prediabetic and diabetic women in particular should be carefully monitored while taking POPs. Lipid metabolism is occasionally affected in that HDL, HDL2, and apolipoprotein A-I and A-II may be decreased; hepatic lipase may be increased. There is no effect on total cholesterol, HDL3, LDL, or VLDL. 4. Drug Interactions Change in contraceptive effectiveness associated with co-administration of other products: a. Anti-Infective Agents and Anticonvulsants. Contraceptive effectiveness may be reduced when hormonal contraceptives are co-administered with antibiotics, anticonvulsants, and other drugs that increase the metabolism of contraceptive steroids. This could result in unintended pregnancy or breakthrough bleeding. Examples include rifampin, barbiturates, phenylbutazone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, felbamate, oxcarbazepine, topiramate, and griseofulvin. b. Anti-HIV Protease Inhibitors. Several of the anti-HIV protease inhibitors have been studied with co-administration of oral contraceptives; significant changes (increase and decrease) in the plasma levels of the estrogen and progestin have been noted in some cases. The safety and efficacy of OC products may be affected with the co-administration of anti-HIV protease inhibitors. Health care providers should refer to the label of the individual anti-HIV protease inhibitors for further drug-drug interaction information. c. Herbal Products. Herbal products containing St. John's Wort (hypericum perforatum) may induce hepatic enzymes (cytochrome P450) and p-glycoprotein transporter and may reduce the effectiveness of contraceptive steroids. This may also result in breakthrough bleeding. 5. Interactions with Laboratory Tests The following endocrine tests may be affected by progestin-only oral contraceptive use: Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations may be decreased. Thyroxine concentrations may be decreased, due to a decrease in thyroid binding globulin (TBG). 6. Carcinogenesis See WARNINGS section. 7. Pregnancy Many studies have found no effects on fetal development associated with long-term use of contraceptive doses of oral progestins. The few studies of infant growth and development that have been conducted have not demonstrated significant adverse effects. It is nonetheless prudent to rule out suspected pregnancy before initiating any hormonal contraceptive use. 8. Nursing Mothers Small amounts of progestin pass into the breast milk, resulting in steroid levels in infant plasma of 1 to 6% of the levels of maternal plasma.6 However, isolated post-market cases of decreased milk production have been reported in POPs. Very rarely, adverse effects in the infant/child have been reported, including jaundice. 9. Fertility Following Discontinuation The limited available data indicate a rapid return of normal ovulation and fertility following discontinuation of progestin-only oral contraceptives. 10. Headache/Migraine If you have a headache or a worsening migraine headache with a new pattern that is recurrent, persistent, or severe, this requires discontinuation of oral contraceptives and evaluation of the cause. 11. Gastrointestinal Diarrhea and/or vomiting may reduce hormone absorption resulting in decreased serum concentrations. 12. Pediatric Use Safety and efficacy of Tulana have been established in women of reproductive age. Safety and efficacy are expected to be the same for postpubertal adolescents under the age of 16 and for users 16 years and older. Use of this product before menarche is not indicated. Tulana (norethindrone tablets) contains FD&C Yellow No. 6 as a color additive. INFORMATION FOR THE PATIENT 1. See PATIENT LABELING for detailed information. 2. Counseling Issues The following points should be discussed with prospective users before prescribing progestin-only oral contraceptives: The necessity of taking pills at the same time every day, including throughout all bleeding episodes. The need to use a backup method such as condoms and spermicides for the next 48 hours whenever a progestin-only oral contraceptive is taken 3 or more hours late. The potential side effects of progestin-only oral contraceptives, particularly menstrual irregularities. The need to inform the clinician of prolonged episodes of bleeding, amenorrhea or severe abdominal pain. The importance of using a barrier method in addition to progestin-only oral contraceptives if a woman is at risk of contracting or transmitting STDs/HIV.
Adverse reactions
ADVERSE REACTIONS Menstrual irregularity is the most frequently reported side effect. Frequent and irregular bleeding are common, while long duration of bleeding episodes and amenorrhea are less likely. Headache, breast tenderness, nausea, and dizziness are increased among progestin-only oral contraceptive users in some studies. Androgenic side effects such as acne, hirsutism, and weight gain occur rarely.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION To achieve maximum contraceptive effectiveness, Tulana tablets must be taken exactly as directed. One tablet is taken every day, at the same time. Administration is continuous, with no interruption between pill packs. See PATIENT LABELING for detailed instructions.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number ANDA207304
Agency product number T18F433X4S
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 50102-200
Date Last Revised 24-04-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 198042
Marketing authorisation holder Afaxys Pharma, LLC