Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 24 November 2019

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE TRADJENTA is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. TRADJENTA is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (1) Limitations of Use Should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (1) Has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis (1) Limitations of Use TRADJENTA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis, as it would not be effective in these settings. TRADJENTA has not been studied in patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at an increased risk for the development of pancreatitis while using TRADJENTA [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS TRADJENTA is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to linagliptin or any of the excipients in TRADJENTA, reactions such as anaphylaxis, angioedema, exfoliative skin conditions, urticaria, or bronchial hyperreactivity have occurred [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4) and Adverse Reactions (6)]. Hypersensitivity to linagliptin or any excipients in TRADJENTA, reactions such as anaphylaxis, angioedema, exfoliative skin conditions, urticaria, or bronchial hyperreactivity have occurred. (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are described below or elsewhere in the prescribing information: Pancreatitis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Heart Failure [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Use with Medications Known to Cause Hypoglycemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] Hypersensitivity Reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] Severe and Disabling Arthralgia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)] Bullous Pemphigoid [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)] Adverse reactions reported in ≥5% of patients treated with TRADJENTA and more commonly than in patients treated with placebo included nasopharyngitis (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. at 1-800-542-6257 or 1-800-459-9906 TTY, or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The safety evaluation of TRADJENTA 5 mg once daily in patients with type 2 diabetes is based on 14 placebo-controlled trials, 1 active-controlled study, and one study in patients with severe renal impairment. In the 14 placebo-controlled studies, a total of 3625 patients were randomized and treated with TRADJENTA 5 mg daily and 2176 with placebo. The mean exposure in patients treated with TRADJENTA across studies was 29.6 weeks. The maximum follow-up was 78 weeks. TRADJENTA 5 mg once daily was studied as monotherapy in three placebo-controlled trials of 18 and 24 weeks' duration and in five additional placebo-controlled studies lasting ≤18 weeks. The use of TRADJENTA in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents was studied in six placebo-controlled trials: two with metformin (12 and 24 weeks' treatment duration); one with a sulfonylurea (18 weeks' treatment duration); one with metformin and sulfonylurea (24 weeks' treatment duration); one with pioglitazone (24 weeks' treatment duration); and one with insulin (primary endpoint at 24 weeks). In a pooled dataset of 14 placebo-controlled clinical trials, adverse reactions that occurred in ≥2% of patients receiving TRADJENTA (n = 3625) and more commonly than in patients given placebo (n = 2176), are shown in Table 1. The overall incidence of adverse events with TRADJENTA were similar to placebo. Table 1 Adverse Reactions Reported in ≥2% of Patients Treated with TRADJENTA and Greater than Placebo in Placebo-Controlled Clinical Studies of TRADJENTA Monotherapy or Combination Therapy Number (%) of Patients TRADJENTA 5 mg n = 3625 Placebo n = 2176 Nasopharyngitis 254 (7.0) 132 (6.1) Diarrhea 119 (3.3) 65 (3.0) Cough 76 (2.1) 30 (1.4) Rates for other adverse reactions for TRADJENTA 5 mg vs placebo when TRADJENTA was used in combination with specific anti-diabetic agents were: urinary tract infection (3.1% vs 0%) and hypertriglyceridemia (2.4% vs 0%) when TRADJENTA was used as add-on to sulfonylurea; hyperlipidemia (2.7% vs 0.8%) and weight increased (2.3% vs 0.8%) when TRADJENTA was used as add-on to pioglitazone; and constipation (2.1% vs 1%) when TRADJENTA was used as add-on to basal insulin therapy. Following 104 weeks' treatment in a controlled study comparing TRADJENTA with glimepiride in which all patients were also receiving metformin, adverse reactions reported in ≥5% of patients treated with TRADJENTA (n = 776) and more frequently than in patients treated with a sulfonylurea (n = 775) were back pain (9.1% vs 8.4%), arthralgia (8.1% vs 6.1%), upper respiratory tract infection (8.0% vs 7.6%), headache (6.4% vs 5.2%), cough (6.1% vs 4.9%), and pain in extremity (5.3% vs 3.9%). Other adverse reactions reported in clinical studies with treatment of TRADJENTA were hypersensitivity (e.g., urticaria, angioedema, localized skin exfoliation, or bronchial hyperreactivity) and myalgia. In the clinical trial program, pancreatitis was reported in 15.2 cases per 10,000 patient year exposure while being treated with TRADJENTA compared with 3.7 cases per 10,000 patient year exposure while being treated with comparator (placebo and active comparator, sulfonylurea). Three additional cases of pancreatitis were reported following the last administered dose of linagliptin. Hypoglycemia In the placebo-controlled studies, 199 (6.6%) of the total 2994 patients treated with TRADJENTA 5 mg reported hypoglycemia compared to 56 patients (3.6%) of 1546 placebo-treated patients. The incidence of hypoglycemia was similar to placebo when TRADJENTA was administered as monotherapy or in combination with metformin, or with pioglitazone. When TRADJENTA was administered in combination with metformin and a sulfonylurea, 181 of 792 (22.9%) patients reported hypoglycemia compared with 39 of 263 (14.8%) patients administered placebo in combination with metformin and a sulfonylurea. Adverse reactions of hypoglycemia were based on all reports of hypoglycemia. A concurrent glucose measurement was not required or was normal in some patients. Therefore, it is not possible to conclusively determine that all these reports reflect true hypoglycemia. In the study of patients receiving TRADJENTA as add-on therapy to a stable dose of insulin for up to 52 weeks (n=1261), no significant difference in the incidence of investigator reported hypoglycemia, defined as all symptomatic or asymptomatic episodes with a self-measured blood glucose ≤70 mg/dL, was noted between the TRADJENTA- (31.4%) and placebo- (32.9%) treated groups. During the same time period, severe hypoglycemic events, defined as requiring the assistance of another person to actively administer carbohydrate, glucagon or other resuscitative actions, were reported in 11 (1.7%) of TRADJENTA-treated patients and 7 (1.1%) of placebo-treated patients. Events that were considered life-threatening or required hospitalization were reported in 3 (0.5%) patients on TRADJENTA and 1 (0.2%) on placebo. Use in Renal Impairment TRADJENTA was compared to placebo as add-on to pre-existing antidiabetic therapy over 52 weeks in 133 patients with severe renal impairment (estimated GFR <30 mL/min). For the initial 12 weeks of the study, background antidiabetic therapy was kept stable and included insulin, sulfonylurea, glinides, and pioglitazone. For the remainder of the trial, dose adjustments in antidiabetic background therapy were allowed. In general, the incidence of adverse events including severe hypoglycemia was similar to those reported in other TRADJENTA trials. The observed incidence of hypoglycemia was higher (TRADJENTA, 63% compared to placebo, 49%) due to an increase in asymptomatic hypoglycemic events especially during the first 12 weeks when background glycemic therapies were kept stable. Ten TRADJENTA-treated patients (15%) and 11 placebo-treated patients (17%) reported at least one episode of confirmed symptomatic hypoglycemia (accompanying finger stick glucose ≤54 mg/dL). During the same time period, severe hypoglycemic events, defined as an event requiring the assistance of another person to actively administer carbohydrate, glucagon or other resuscitative actions, were reported in 3 (4.4%) TRADJENTA-treated patients and 3 (4.6%) placebo-treated patients. Events that were considered life-threatening or required hospitalization were reported in 2 (2.9%) patients on TRADJENTA and 1 (1.5%) patient on placebo. Renal function as measured by mean eGFR and creatinine clearance did not change over 52 weeks' treatment compared to placebo. Laboratory Tests Changes in laboratory findings were similar in patients treated with TRADJENTA 5 mg compared to patients treated with placebo. Increase in Uric Acid: Changes in laboratory values that occurred more frequently in the TRADJENTA group and ≥1% more than in the placebo group were increases in uric acid (1.3% in the placebo group, 2.7% in the TRADJENTA group). Increase in Lipase: In a placebo-controlled clinical trial with TRADJENTA in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with micro- or macroalbuminuria, a mean increase of 30% in lipase concentrations from baseline to 24 weeks was observed in the TRADJENTA arm compared to a mean decrease of 2% in the placebo arm. Lipase levels above 3 times upper limit of normal were seen in 8.2% compared to 1.7% patients in the TRADJENTA and placebo arms, respectively. Vital Signs No clinically meaningful changes in vital signs were observed in patients treated with TRADJENTA. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience Additional adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of TRADJENTA. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is generally not possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Acute pancreatitis, including fatal pancreatitis [see Indications and Usage (1)] Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis, angioedema, and exfoliative skin conditions Severe and disabling arthralgia Bullous pemphigoid Rash Mouth ulceration, stomatitis Rhabdomyolysis

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION The recommended dose of TRADJENTA is 5 mg once daily (2.1) TRADJENTA can be taken with or without food (2.1) 2.1 Recommended Dosing The recommended dose of TRADJENTA is 5 mg once daily. TRADJENTA tablets can be taken with or without food.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary The limited data with TRADJENTA use in pregnant women are not sufficient to inform of drug-associated risk for major birth defects and miscarriage. There are risks to the mother and fetus associated with poorly controlled diabetes in pregnancy [see Clinical Considerations]. In animal reproduction studies, no adverse developmental effects were observed when linagliptin was administered to pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis at doses similar to the maximum recommended clinical dose, based on exposure [see Data]. The estimated background risk of major birth defects is 6 to 10% in women with pre-gestational diabetes with a HbA1c>7 and has been reported to be as high as 20 to 25% in women with HbA1c>10. The estimated background risk of miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk Poorly controlled diabetes in pregnancy increases the maternal risk for diabetic ketoacidosis, pre-eclampsia, spontaneous abortions, preterm delivery, and delivery complications. Poorly controlled diabetes increases the fetal risk for major birth defects, stillbirth, and macrosomia related morbidity. Data Animal Data No adverse developmental outcome was observed when linagliptin was administered to pregnant Wistar Han rats and Himalayan rabbits during the period of organogenesis at doses up to 240 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg, respectively. These doses represent approximately 943 times (rats) and 1943 times (rabbits) the 5 mg clinical dose, based on exposure. No adverse functional, behavioral, or reproductive outcome was observed in offspring following administration of linagliptin to Wistar Han rats from gestation day 6 to lactation day 21 at a dose 49 times the 5 mg clinical dose, based on exposure. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There is no information regarding the presence of linagliptin in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. However, linagliptin is present in rat milk. Therefore, the developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for TRADJENTA and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from TRADJENTA or from the underlying maternal condition. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of TRADJENTA in pediatric patients under 18 years of age have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use There were 4040 type 2 diabetes patients treated with linagliptin 5 mg from 15 clinical trials of TRADJENTA; 1085 (27%) were 65 years and over, while 131 (3%) were 75 years and over. Of these patients, 2566 were enrolled in 12 double-blind placebo-controlled studies; 591 (23%) were 65 years and over, while 82 (3%) were 75 years and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between patients 65 years and over and younger patients. Therefore, no dose adjustment is recommended in the elderly population. While clinical studies of linagliptin have not identified differences in response between the elderly and younger patients, greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. 8.6 Renal Impairment No dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. In the TRADJENTA treatment arm of the CARMELINA trial [see Clinical Studies (14.2)], 2200 (63%) patients had renal impairment (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Approximately 20% of the population had eGFR ≥45 to <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, 28% of the population had eGFR ≥30 to <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 15% had eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2. The overall incidence of adverse reactions were generally similar between the TRADJENTA and placebo treatment arms. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment No dose adjustment is recommended for patients with hepatic impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Strong P-glycoprotein/CYP3A4 inducer: The efficacy of TRADJENTA may be reduced when administered in combination (e.g., with rifampin). Use of alternative treatments is strongly recommended. (7.1) 7.1 Inducers of P-glycoprotein or CYP3A4 Enzymes Rifampin decreased linagliptin exposure, suggesting that the efficacy of TRADJENTA may be reduced when administered in combination with a strong P-gp or CYP3A4 inducer. Therefore, use of alternative treatments is strongly recommended when linagliptin is to be administered with a strong P-gp or CYP3A4 inducer [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.2 Insulin Secretagogues or Insulin Coadministration of TRADJENTA with an insulin secretagogue (e.g., sulfonylurea) or insulin may require lower doses of the insulin secretagogue or insulin to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA201280
Agency product number 3X29ZEJ4R2
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 50090-4383
Date Last Revised 26-07-2019
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 1100706
Storage and handling Storage Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15°-30°C (59°-86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].
Marketing authorisation holder A-S Medication Solutions