Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 12 July 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE SIMPONI is a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker indicated for the treatment of adult patients with: Moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in combination with methotrexate (1.1) Active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) alone, or in combination with methotrexate (1.2) Active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (1.3) Moderate to severe Ulcerative colitis (UC) with an inadequate response or intolerant to prior treatment or requiring continuous steroid therapy (1.4) inducing and maintaining clinical response improving endoscopic appearance of the mucosa during induction inducing clinical remission achieving and sustaining clinical remission in induction responders 1.1 Rheumatoid Arthritis SIMPONI, in combination with methotrexate, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. 1.2 Psoriatic Arthritis SIMPONI, alone or in combination with methotrexate, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis. 1.3 Ankylosing Spondylitis SIMPONI is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with active ankylosing spondylitis. 1.4 Ulcerative Colitis SIMPONI is indicated in adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis who have demonstrated corticosteroid dependence or who have had an inadequate response to or failed to tolerate oral aminosalicylates, oral corticosteroids, azathioprine, or 6-mercaptopurine for: inducing and maintaining clinical response improving endoscopic appearance of the mucosa during induction inducing clinical remission achieving and sustaining clinical remission in induction responders [see Clinical Studies (14.4)].

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contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS None. None (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS Most common adverse reactions (incidence > 5%) are upper respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngitis, injection site reactions (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Janssen Biotech, Inc. at 1-800-JANSSEN (1-800-526-7736) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice. The safety data described below are based on 5 pooled, randomized, double-blind, controlled Phase 3 trials in patients with RA, PsA, and AS (Trials RA-1, RA-2, RA-3, PsA, and AS) [see Clinical Studies (14.1, 14.2, and 14.3)]. These 5 trials included 639 control-treated patients and 1659 SIMPONI-treated patients including 1089 with RA, 292 with PsA, and 278 with AS. The safety data in 1233 SIMPONI-treated patients with ulcerative colitis from 3 pooled, randomized, double-blind, controlled Phase 2/3 trials are also described below (Trials UC-1, UC-2, and UC-3) [see Clinical Studies (14.4)]. The proportion of patients who discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions in the controlled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in RA, PsA and AS was 2% for SIMPONI-treated patients and 3% for placebo-treated patients. The most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of SIMPONI in the controlled Phase 3 trials in RA, PsA and AS through Week 16 were sepsis (0.2%), alanine aminotransferase increased (0.2%), and aspartate aminotransferase increased (0.2%). The most common adverse drug reactions leading to discontinuation through Week 60 of the UC trials in patients who received SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during maintenance compared with patients who received SIMPONI induction and placebo during maintenance were tuberculosis (0.3% vs. 0.6%) and anemia (0.3% vs. 0%), respectively. The most serious adverse reactions were: Serious Infections [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Malignancies [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Upper respiratory tract infection and nasopharyngitis were the most common adverse reactions reported in the combined Phase 3 RA, PsA and AS trials through Week 16, occurring in 7% and 6% of SIMPONI-treated patients as compared with 6% and 5% of control-treated patients, respectively. Infections In controlled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in RA, PsA, and AS, infections were observed in 28% of SIMPONI-treated patients compared to 25% of control-treated patients. For serious infections, see the Warnings and Precautions section [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. In the controlled Phase 2/3 trial of SIMPONI induction through Week 6 in UC, the rates of infections were similar in SIMPONI 200/100 mg-treated patients and placebo-treated patients, or approximately 12%. Through Week 60, the incidence per patient year of infections was similar in patients who received SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during maintenance compared with patients who received SIMPONI induction and placebo during the maintenance portion of the UC trial. Demyelinating Disorders In the controlled Phase 2/3 trial of SIMPONI induction through Week 6, no cases of demyelination were observed in SIMPONI 200/100 mg-treated patients or placebo-treated patients. Through Week 60, there were no cases of demyelination in the SIMPONI 100-mg group during maintenance. One case of CNS demyelination was observed in the placebo maintenance group in a patient who received SIMPONI 400/200 mg during induction. Liver Enzyme Elevations There have been reports of severe hepatic reactions including acute liver failure in patients receiving TNF blockers. In controlled Phase 3 trials of SIMPONI in patients with RA, PsA, and AS through Week 16, ALT elevations ≥ 5 × ULN occurred in 0.2% of control-treated patients and 0.7% of SIMPONI-treated patients and ALT elevations ≥ 3 × ULN occurred in 2% of control-treated patients and 2% of SIMPONI-treated patients. Since many of the patients in the Phase 3 trials for RA, PsA, and AS were also taking medications that cause liver enzyme elevations (e.g., NSAIDs, MTX), the relationship between SIMPONI and liver enzyme elevation is not clear. In Phase 2/3 UC trials, the incidence of ALT elevations ≥ 5 × ULN was similar in SIMPONI-treated patients and placebo-treated patients, or approximately 1%, with an average duration of follow-up of 46 weeks and 18 weeks, respectively. ALT elevations ≥ 3 × ULN occurred in 2.0% of SIMPONI-treated patients compared with 1.5% of placebo-treated patients with an average duration of follow-up of 46 weeks and 18 weeks, respectively. Autoimmune Disorders and Autoantibodies In the controlled Phase 3 trials in patients with RA, PsA, and AS through Week 14, there was no association of SIMPONI treatment and the development of newly positive anti-dsDNA antibodies. In Phase 3 trials in RA, PsA, and AS through 1 year of follow-up, 4.0% of SIMPONI-treated patients and 2.6% of control patients were newly antinuclear antibody (ANA)-positive (at titers of 1:160 or greater). The frequency of anti-dsDNA antibodies at 1 year of follow-up was uncommon in patients who were anti-dsDNA negative at baseline. Through Week 60 of the UC trials, 3.5% of patients who received SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during maintenance were newly ANA-positive (at titers of 1:160 or greater) compared with 3.5% of patients who received SIMPONI induction and placebo during the maintenance portion of the UC trial. The frequency of anti-dsDNA antibodies at 1 year of follow-up in patients who were anti-dsDNA negative at baseline was 0.5% in patients receiving SIMPONI induction and 100 mg during maintenance compared with 0% in patients who received SIMPONI induction and placebo during maintenance [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)]. Injection Site Reactions In controlled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in RA, PsA and AS, 6% of SIMPONI-treated patients had injection site reactions compared with 2% of control-treated patients. The majority of the injection site reactions were mild and the most frequent manifestation was injection site erythema. In the controlled Phase 2/3 trial through Week 6 in UC, 3.4% of SIMPONI-treated patients had injection site reactions compared with 1.5% in control-treated patients. The majority of the injection site reactions were mild and moderate and the most frequent manifestation was injection site erythema. In controlled Phase 2 and 3 trials in RA, PsA, AS, and Phase 2/3 UC trials, no patients treated with SIMPONI developed anaphylactic reactions. Other Adverse Reactions Table 1 summarizes the adverse drug reactions that occurred at a rate of at least 1% in the SIMPONI ± DMARD group and with a higher incidence than in the placebo ± DMARD group during the controlled period of the 5 pooled Phase 3 trials through Week 16 in patients with RA, PsA, and AS. Table 1: Adverse Drug Reactions Reported by ≥ 1% of SIMPONI-Treated Patients and With a Higher Incidence Than Placebo-Treated Patients in the Phase 3 Trials of RA, PsA, and AS through Week 16Patients may have taken concomitant MTX, sulfasalazine, hydroxychloroquine, low dose corticosteroids (≤ 10 mg of prednisone/day or equivalent), and/or NSAIDs during the trials). SIMPONI ± DMARDs Placebo ± DMARDs Patients treated 1659 639 Adverse Reaction Infections and infestations Upper respiratory tract infection (nasopharyngitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis, and rhinitis) 16% 13% Viral infections (such as influenza and herpes) 5% 3% Bronchitis 2% 1% Superficial fungal infections 2% 1% Sinusitis 2% 1% General disorders and administration site conditions Injection site reaction (injection site erythema, urticaria, induration, pain, bruising, pruritus, irritation, paresthesia) 6% 2% Investigations Alanine aminotransferase increased 4% 3% Aspartate aminotransferase increased 3% 2% Vascular disorders Hypertension 3% 2% Nervous system disorders Dizziness 2% 1% Paresthesia 2% 1% Gastrointestinal disorders Constipation 1% <1% Less Common Clinical Trial Adverse Drug Reactions Adverse drug reactions that occurred <1% in SIMPONI-treated patients during the SIMPONI clinical trials that do not appear in the Warnings and Precautions section included the following events listed by system organ class: Infections and infestations: Septic shock, atypical mycobacterial infection, pyelonephritis, arthritis bacterial, bursitis infective Neoplasms benign, malignant and unspecified: Leukemia Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: Psoriasis (new onset or worsening, palmar/plantar and pustular), vasculitis (cutaneous) Vascular disorders: Vasculitis (systemic) Other Clinical Trial Adverse Drug Reactions in Ulcerative Colitis Clinical Trials In the Phase 2/3 trials in UC evaluating 1233 SIMPONI-treated patients, no new adverse drug reactions were identified and the frequency of adverse drug reactions was similar to the safety profile observed in patients with RA, PsA and AS. 6.2 Immunogenicity As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to golimumab in the trials described below with the incidence of antibodies in other trials or to other products may be misleading. Results from the EIA Method Using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA method), antibodies to golimumab were detected in 57 (4%) of SIMPONI-treated patients across the Phase 3 RA, PsA and AS trials through Week 24. Similar rates were observed in each of the 3 indications. Patients who received SIMPONI with concomitant MTX had a lower proportion of antibodies to golimumab than patients who received SIMPONI without MTX (approximately 2% vs. 7%, respectively). With the EIA method, the presence of serum concentrations of golimumab can interfere with the detection of antibodies to golimumab leading to inconclusive results. In UC trials, 34 (3%), 341 (28%) and 823 (69%) of SIMPONI-treated patients were positive, negative and inconclusive for antibodies to golimumab, respectively. Treatment with concomitant immunomodulators (AZA, 6-MP or MTX) resulted in a lower proportion of patients with antibodies to golimumab than patients receiving SIMPONI without immunomodulators (2% vs. 4%, respectively). Of the patients with a positive antibody response to golimumab in the Phase 2 and 3 trials, most were determined to have neutralizing antibodies to golimumab as measured by a cell-based functional assay. Results from the Drug-Tolerant EIA Method A drug-tolerant enzyme immunoassay (drug-tolerant EIA) method for detecting antibodies to golimumab was developed and validated, which eliminated the inconclusive category as reported above. This method is approximately 16-fold more sensitive than the original EIA method with less interference from golimumab in serum. Based on the drug tolerant EIA method, 246 (23%) of SIMPONI-treated patients across the Phase 3 RA, PsA and AS trials, antibodies to golimumab were detected in 59 (16%), 106 (28%), and 81 (24%) patients, respectively. Treatment with concomitant MTX resulted in a lower proportion of patients with antibodies to golimumab than in patients receiving SIMPONI without MTX in RA patients (7% vs. 35%), in PsA patients (18% vs. 38%) and in AS patients (6% vs. 29%). A trend of decreasing drug concentrations with increasing antibody titers was observed. While an overall decrease in clinical efficacy for ADA positive patients compared with ADA negative patients was not observed in patients with RA (ACR 20: 75% vs. 75%), PsA (ACR 20: 72% vs. 66%) and AS (ASAS 20: 57% vs. 65%), higher titer antibodies may be associated with diminished efficacy. In the UC trials, 254 (21%) of SIMPONI-treated patients were positive for antibodies to golimumab through week 54 while the remaining 941 (79%) patients were negative. Treatment with concomitant immunomodulators (AZA, 6-MP or MTX) in the UC trials resulted in a lower proportion of patients with antibodies to golimumab than in patients receiving SIMPONI without immunomodulators (12% vs. 26%). There is a trend of decreasing drug concentrations with increasing antibody titers. Although the development of antibodies to golimumab did not preclude clinical response, a trend toward decreased efficacy in ADA positive patients was observed compared to ADA negative patients in the UC trials (clinical response 38% vs. 53%). 6.3 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of golimumab. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to SIMPONI exposure. Immune system disorders: Serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylactic reaction) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.11)], sarcoidosis Neoplasms benign, malignant and unspecified: Melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: Interstitial lung disease Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: Skin exfoliation, rash, bullous skin reactions

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION RA, PsA, and AS: 50 mg administered by subcutaneous injection once a month (2.1) UC: 200 mg initially administered by subcutaneous injection at Week 0, followed by 100 mg at Week 2 and then 100 mg every 4 weeks (2.2) 2.1 Dosage in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis The SIMPONI dose regimen is 50 mg administered by subcutaneous injection once a month. For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), SIMPONI should be given in combination with methotrexate and for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS), SIMPONI may be given with or without methotrexate or other nonbiologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs). For patients with RA, PsA, or AS, corticosteroids, non-biologic DMARDs, and/or NSAIDs may be continued during treatment with SIMPONI. 2.2 Dosage in Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis The recommended SIMPONI induction dosage regimen is a 200-mg subcutaneous injection at Week 0, followed by 100 mg at Week 2, and then maintenance therapy with 100 mg every 4 weeks. 2.3 Monitoring to Assess Safety Prior to initiating SIMPONI and periodically during therapy, evaluate patients for active tuberculosis and tested for latent infection [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Prior to initiating SIMPONI, patients should be tested for hepatitis B viral infection [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. 2.4 Important Administration Instructions SIMPONI is intended for use under the guidance and supervision of a healthcare provider. After proper training in subcutaneous injection technique, a patient may self-inject with SIMPONI if a physician determines that it is appropriate. Instruct patients to follow the directions provided below [see Instructions for Use]: To ensure proper use, allow the prefilled syringe or autoinjector to sit at room temperature outside the carton for at least 30 minutes prior to subcutaneous injection. Do not warm SIMPONI in any other way. Prior to administration, visually inspect the solution for particles and discoloration through the viewing window. SIMPONI is clear to slightly opalescent and colorless to light yellow. Do not use SIMPONI, if the solution is discolored, or cloudy, or if foreign particles are present. Do not use any leftover product remaining in the prefilled syringe or prefilled autoinjector. Instruct patients sensitive to latex not to handle the needle cover on the prefilled syringe or the needle cover of the prefilled syringe within the autoinjector cap because it contains dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex). At the time of dosing, if multiple injections are required, administer the injections at different sites on the body. Rotate injection sites and never give injections into areas where the skin is tender, bruised, red, or hard.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary There are no adequate and well-controlled trials of SIMPONI in pregnant women. Monoclonal antibodies, such as golimumab, are transported across the placenta during the third trimester of pregnancy and may affect immune response in the in utero exposed infant [see Clinical Considerations]. In an animal reproductive study, golimumab administered by the subcutaneous route to pregnant monkeys, during the period of organogenesis, at doses that produced exposures approximately 360 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) had no adverse fetal effects [see Data]. In a pre- and post-natal development study with pregnant monkeys, subcutaneous administration of golimumab, during the later gestational and lactation periods, at doses producing maximal maternal blood concentrations approximately 460 times those found with the MRHD had no adverse developmental effects on infants [see Data]. SIMPONI should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risks of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2–4% and of miscarriage is 15–20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reactions Golimumab crosses the placenta during pregnancy. Another TNF-blocking monoclonal antibody administered during pregnancy was detected for up to 6 months in the serum of infants. Consequently, these infants may be at increased risk of infection. Administration of live vaccines to infants exposed to SIMPONI in utero is not recommended for 6 months following the mother's last SIMPONI injection during pregnancy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10) and Drug Interactions (7.3)]. Data Human Data Limited data on use of SIMPONI in pregnant women from observational studies, published case reports, and postmarketing surveillance are insufficient to inform a drug associated risk. Animal Data In an embryofetal developmental toxicology study in which pregnant cynomolgus monkeys were treated with golimumab during the period organogenesis from gestation days (GD) 20 to 51, exposures up to 360 times greater than the exposure at the MRHD (on an area under the curve (AUC) basis with maternal subcutaneous doses up to 50 mg/kg twice weekly) produced no evidence of fetal malformations or embryotoxicity. There was no evidence of maternal toxicity. Umbilical cord blood samples collected at the end of the second trimester showed that fetuses were exposed to golimumab during gestation. In a pre- and postnatal developmental study in which pregnant cynomolgus monkeys were treated with golimumab from gestation day 50 to postpartum day 33, maximal drug concentrations approximately 460 times greater than that found with the MRHD (on a maximum blood concentration (Cmax) basis at steady-state with maternal subcutaneous doses up to 50 mg/kg twice weekly) were not associated with any evidence of developmental defects in infants. There was no evidence of maternal toxicity. Golimumab was present in fetal serum at the end of the second trimester and in neonatal serum from the time of birth and for up to 6 months postpartum. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There is no information regarding the presence of SIMPONI in human milk, the effects on breastfed infants, or the effects on milk production. Maternal IgG is known to be present in human milk. If golimumab is transferred into human milk, the effects of local exposure in the gastrointestinal tract and potential limited systemic exposure in the infant to golimumab are unknown. The developmental and health benefits of breast-feeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for SIMPONI and any potential adverse effects on the breast-fed infants from SIMPONI, or from the underlying maternal condition. Data Animal Data In the pre- and postnatal development study in cynomolgus monkeys in which golimumab was administered subcutaneously during pregnancy and lactation, golimumab was detected in the breast milk at concentrations that were approximately 400-fold lower than the maternal serum concentrations. 8.4 Pediatric Use Effectiveness of SIMPONI in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age has not been established. The safety and efficacy of SIMPONI were evaluated in a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized-withdrawal, parallel group study in 173 children (2 to 17 years of age) with active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) despite treatment with MTX for at least 3 months. Subjects were maintained on their stable dose of MTX at the same dose (mg/week) at study entry. Concurrent use of stable doses of oral corticosteroids (≤10 mg/day or 0.2 mg/kg/day prednisone or equivalent, whichever was less) and/or NSAIDs was permitted. In the 16 week open-label phase, all patients received MTX and SIMPONI 30 mg/m2 (maximum 50 mg) subcutaneously every 4 weeks. Patients who achieved an ACR Ped 30 response at Week 16 entered the randomized-withdrawal phase of the study and received MTX and either SIMPONI 30 mg/m2 (maximum 50 mg) or placebo every 4 weeks through Week 48. The primary endpoint of the study was the proportion of patients who did not experience a flare between Week 16 and Week 48, among all subjects who entered the randomized withdrawal phase. The efficacy of SIMPONI in the treatment of pJIA was not demonstrated in this study because there was no statistical evidence of differences in flare rate between SIMPONI-treated patients and placebo patients between Weeks 16 and 48. In this study, the frequency and type of the adverse reactions seen in children were generally similar to those observed in adults. 8.5 Geriatric Use In the Phase 3 trials in RA, PsA, and AS, there were no overall differences in SAEs, serious infections, and AEs in SIMPONI-treated patients ages 65 or older (N=155) compared with younger SIMPONI-treated patients. In UC, there were insufficient numbers of patients aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from patients aged 18 to 65. Because there is a higher incidence of infections in the geriatric population in general, caution should be used in treating geriatric patients with SIMPONI.

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Abatacept: Increased risk of serious infection (5.1, 5.6, 7.2) Anakinra: Increased risk of serious infection (5.1, 5.7, 7.2) Live vaccines/therapeutic infectious agents: Avoid use with SIMPONI (5.10, 7.3). 7.1 Methotrexate For the treatment of RA, SIMPONI should be used with methotrexate (MTX) [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. Since the presence or absence of concomitant MTX did not appear to influence the efficacy or safety of SIMPONI in the treatment of PsA or AS, SIMPONI can be used with or without MTX in the treatment of PsA and AS [see Clinical Studies (14.2, 14.3) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.2 Biological Products for RA, PsA, and/or AS An increased risk of serious infections has been seen in clinical RA trials of other TNF blockers used in combination with anakinra or abatacept, with no added benefit; therefore, use of SIMPONI with abatacept or anakinra is not recommended [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6, 5.7)]. A higher rate of serious infections has also been observed in RA patients treated with rituximab who received subsequent treatment with a TNF blocker. The concomitant use of SIMPONI with biologics approved to treat RA, PsA, or AS is not recommended because of the possibility of an increased risk of infection. 7.3 Live Vaccines/Therapeutic Infectious Agents Live vaccines should not be given concurrently with SIMPONI [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10)]. Therapeutic infectious agents should not be given concurrently with SIMPONI [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10)]. Infants born to women treated with SIMPONI during their pregnancy may be at increased risk of infection for up to 6 months. Administration of live vaccines to infants exposed to SIMPONI in utero is not recommended for 6 months following the mother's last SIMPONI injection during pregnancy [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)]. 7.4 Cytochrome P450 Substrates The formation of CYP450 enzymes may be suppressed by increased levels of cytokines (e.g., TNFα) during chronic inflammation. Therefore, it is expected that for a molecule that antagonizes cytokine activity, such as golimumab, the formation of CYP450 enzymes could be normalized. Upon initiation or discontinuation of SIMPONI in patients being treated with CYP450 substrates with a narrow therapeutic index, monitoring of the effect (e.g., warfarin) or drug concentration (e.g., cyclosporine or theophylline) is recommended and the individual dose of the drug product may be adjusted as needed.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number BLA125289
Agency product number 91X1KLU43E
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 57894-070,57894-071
Date Last Revised 01-06-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 1653144
Storage and handling Storage and Handling Refrigerate SIMPONI at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C) in the original carton to protect from light until the time of use. Do not freeze. Do not shake. Do not use SIMPONI beyond the expiration date (EXP) on the carton or the expiration date on the prefilled syringe (observed through the viewing window) or the prefilled SmartJect autoinjector. If needed, SIMPONI may be stored at room temperature up to 77°F (25°C) for a maximum single period of 30 days in the original carton to protect from light. Once a syringe or autoinjector has been stored at room temperature, do not return the product to the refrigerator. If not used within 30 days at room temperature, discard SIMPONI.
Marketing authorisation holder Janssen Biotech, Inc.
Warnings WARNING: SERIOUS INFECTIONS AND MALIGNANCY WARNING: SERIOUS INFECTIONS AND MALIGNANCY See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Serious infections leading to hospitalization or death including tuberculosis (TB), bacterial sepsis, invasive fungal (such as histoplasmosis), and other opportunistic infections have occurred in patients receiving SIMPONI (5.1) Discontinue SIMPONI if a patient develops a serious infection or sepsis (5.1) Perform test for latent TB; if positive, start treatment for TB prior to starting SIMPONI (5.1) Monitor all patients for active TB during treatment, even if initial latent TB test is negative (5.1) Lymphoma and other malignancies, some fatal, have been reported in children and adolescent patients treated with TNF blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member (5.2) SERIOUS INFECTIONS Patients treated with SIMPONI® are at increased risk for developing serious infections that may lead to hospitalization or death [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Most patients who developed these infections were taking concomitant immunosuppressants such as methotrexate or corticosteroids. Discontinue SIMPONI if a patient develops a serious infection. Reported infections with TNF blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member, include: Active tuberculosis, including reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis have frequently presented with disseminated or extrapulmonary disease. Test patients for latent tuberculosis before SIMPONI use and during therapy. Initiate treatment for latent TB prior to SIMPONI use. Invasive fungal infections including histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, candidiasis, aspergillosis, blastomycosis, and pneumocystosis. Patients with histoplasmosis or other invasive fungal infections may present with disseminated, rather than localized, disease. Antigen and antibody testing for histoplasmosis may be negative in some patients with active infection. Consider empiric antifungal therapy in patients at risk for invasive fungal infections who develop severe systemic illness. Bacterial, viral, and other infections due to opportunistic pathogens, including Legionella and Listeria. Consider the risks and benefits of treatment with SIMPONI prior to initiating therapy in patients with chronic or recurrent infection. Monitor patients closely for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with SIMPONI, including the possible development of tuberculosis in patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. MALIGNANCY Lymphoma and other malignancies, some fatal, have been reported in children and adolescent patients treated with TNF blockers, of which SIMPONI is a member [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] .