Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 11 July 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE Prolia is a RANK ligand (RANKL) inhibitor indicated for: Treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture (1.1) Treatment to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture (1.2) Treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in men and women at high risk for fracture (1.3) Treatment to increase bone mass in men at high risk for fracture receiving androgen deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer (1.4) Treatment to increase bone mass in women at high risk for fracture receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer (1.5) 1.1 Treatment of Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis at High Risk for Fracture Prolia is indicated for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy. In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, Prolia reduces the incidence of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fractures [see Clinical Studies ( 14.1 )]. 1.2 Treatment to Increase Bone Mass in Men with Osteoporosis Prolia is indicated for treatment to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy [ see Clinical Studies ( 14.2 ) ]. 1.3 Treatment of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis Prolia is indicated for the treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in men and women at high risk of fracture who are either initiating or continuing systemic glucocorticoids in a daily dosage equivalent to 7.5 mg or greater of prednisone and expected to remain on glucocorticoids for at least 6 months. High risk of fracture is defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, multiple risk factors for fracture, or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy [see Clinical Studies ( 14.3 )]. 1.4 Treatment of Bone Loss in Men Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Prolia is indicated as a treatment to increase bone mass in men at high risk for fracture receiving androgen deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. In these patients Prolia also reduced the incidence of vertebral fractures [see Clinical Studies ( 14.4 )]. 1.5 Treatment of Bone Loss in Women Receiving Adjuvant Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy for Breast Cancer Prolia is indicated as a treatment to increase bone mass in women at high risk for fracture receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer [see Clinical Studies ( 14.5 )].

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Prolia is contraindicated in: ∙ Hypocalcemia: Pre-existing hypocalcemia must be corrected prior to initiating therapy with Prolia [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 )]. ∙ Pregnancy: Prolia may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. In women of reproductive potential, pregnancy testing should be performed prior to initiating treatment with Prolia [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1 )]. ∙ Hypersensitivity: Prolia is contraindicated in patients with a history of systemic hypersensitivity to any component of the product. Reactions have included anaphylaxis, facial swelling, and urticaria [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2 ), Adverse Reactions ( 6.2 )]. Hypocalcemia (4, 5.3) Pregnancy (4, 8.1) Known hypersensitivity to Prolia (4, 5.2)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are discussed below and also elsewhere in the labeling: Hypocalcemia [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 )] Serious Infections [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.7 )] Dermatologic Adverse Reactions [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.8 )] Osteonecrosis of the Jaw [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4 )] Atypical Subtrochanteric and Diaphyseal Femoral Fractures [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5 )] Multiple Vertebral Fractures (MVF) Following Discontinuation of Prolia Treatment [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.6 )] The most common adverse reactions reported with Prolia in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis are back pain, pain in extremity, musculoskeletal pain, hypercholesterolemia, and cystitis. The most common adverse reactions reported with Prolia in men with osteoporosis are back pain, arthralgia, and nasopharyngitis. The most common adverse reactions reported with Prolia in patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis are back pain, hypertension, bronchitis, and headache. The most common (per patient incidence ≥ 10%) adverse reactions reported with Prolia in patients with bone loss receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer or adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer are arthralgia and back pain. Pain in extremity and musculoskeletal pain have also been reported in clinical trials. The most common adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of Prolia in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis are back pain and constipation. To report Adverse Reactions with Prolia®, please call Amgen Medical Information at 1-800-772-6436, email [email protected], or report the event at FDA MedWatch. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: Most common adverse reactions (> 5% and more common than placebo) were: back pain, pain in extremity, hypercholesterolemia, musculoskeletal pain, and cystitis. Pancreatitis has been reported in clinical trials (6.1) Male osteoporosis: Most common adverse reactions (> 5% and more common than placebo) were: back pain, arthralgia, and nasopharyngitis (6.1) Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: Most common adverse reactions (> 3% and more common than active-control group) were: back pain, hypertension, bronchitis, and headache (6.1) Bone loss due to hormone ablation for cancer: Most common adverse reactions (≥ 10% and more common than placebo) were: arthralgia and back pain. Pain in extremity and musculoskeletal pain have also been reported in clinical trials (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Amgen Inc. at 1-800-77-AMGEN (1-800-772-6436) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice. Treatment of Postmenopausal Women with O steoporosis The safety of Prolia in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis was assessed in a 3-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of 7808 postmenopausal women aged 60 to 91 years. A total of 3876 women were exposed to placebo and 3886 women were exposed to Prolia administered subcutaneously once every 6 months as a single 60 mg dose. All women were instructed to take at least 1000 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D supplementation per day. The incidence of all-cause mortality was 2.3% (n = 90) in the placebo group and 1.8% (n = 70) in the Prolia group. The incidence of nonfatal serious adverse events was 24.2% in the placebo group and 25.0% in the Prolia group. The percentage of patients who withdrew from the study due to adverse events was 2.1% and 2.4% for the placebo and Prolia groups, respectively. Adverse reactions reported in ≥ 2% of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and more frequently in the Prolia-treated women than in the placebo-treated women are shown in the table below. Table 1. Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥ 2% of Patients with Osteoporosis and More Frequently than in Placebo-treated Patients SYSTEM ORG AN CLASS Preferred Term Prolia (N = 3886) n (%) Placebo (N = 3876) n (%) BLOOD AND LYMPHATIC SYSTEM DISORDERS Anemia 129 (3.3) 107 (2.8) CARDIAC DISORDERS Angina pectoris 101 (2.6) 87 (2.2) Atrial fibrillation 79 (2.0) 77 (2.0) EAR AND LABYRINTH DISORDERS Vertigo 195 (5.0) 187 (4.8) GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS Abdominal pain upper 129 (3.3) 111 (2.9) Flatulence 84 (2.2) 53 (1.4) Gastroesophageal reflux disease 80 (2.1) 66 (1.7) GENERAL DISORDERS AND ADMINISTRATION SITE CONDITIONS Edema peripheral 189 (4.9) 155 (4.0) Asthenia 90 (2.3) 73 (1.9) INFECTIONS AND INFESTATIONS Cystitis 228 (5.9) 225 (5.8) Upper respiratory tract infection 190 (4.9) 167 (4.3) Pneumonia 152 (3.9) 150 (3.9) Pharyngitis 91 (2.3) 78 (2.0) Herpes zoster 79 (2.0) 72 (1.9) METABOLISM AND NUTRITION DISORDERS Hypercholesterolemia 280 (7.2) 236 (6.1) MUSCULOSKELETAL AND CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS Back pain 1347 (34.7) 1340 (34.6) Pain in extremity 453 (11.7) 430 (11.1) Musculoskeletal pain 297 (7.6) 291 (7.5) Bone pain 142 (3.7) 117 (3.0) Myalgia 114 (2.9) 94 (2.4) Spinal osteoarthritis 82 (2.1) 64 (1.7) NERVOUS SYSTEM DISORDERS Sciatica 178 (4.6) 149 (3.8) PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS Insomnia 126 (3.2) 122 (3.1) SKIN AND SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE DISORDERS Rash 96 (2.5) 79 (2.0) Pruritus 87 (2.2) 82 (2.1) Hypocalcemia Decreases in serum calcium levels to less than 8.5 mg/dL at any visit were reported in 0.4% women in the placebo group and 1.7% women in the Prolia group. The nadir in serum calcium level occurs at approximately day 10 after Prolia dosing in subjects with normal renal function. In clinical studies, subjects with impaired renal function were more likely to have greater reductions in serum calcium levels compared to subjects with normal renal function. In a study of 55 subjects with varying degrees of renal function, serum calcium levels < 7.5 mg/dL or symptomatic hypocalcemia were observed in 5 subjects. These included no subjects in the normal renal function group, 10% of subjects in the creatinine clearance 50 to 80 mL/min group, 29% of subjects in the creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min group, and 29% of subjects in the hemodialysis group. These subjects did not receive calcium and vitamin D supplementation. In a study of 4550 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, the mean change from baseline in serum calcium level 10 days after Prolia dosing was -5.5% in subjects with creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min vs. -3.1% in subjects with creatinine clearance ≥ 30 mL/min. Serious Infections Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) is expressed on activated T and B lymphocytes and in lymph nodes. Therefore, a RANKL inhibitor such as Prolia may increase the risk of infection. In the clinical study of 7808 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, the incidence of infections resulting in death was 0.2% in both placebo and Prolia treatment groups. However, the incidence of nonfatal serious infections was 3.3% in the placebo and 4.0% in the Prolia groups. Hospitalizations due to serious infections in the abdomen (0.7% placebo vs. 0.9% Prolia), urinary tract (0.5% placebo vs. 0.7% Prolia), and ear (0.0% placebo vs. 0.1% Prolia) were reported. Endocarditis was reported in no placebo patients and 3 patients receiving Prolia. Skin infections, including erysipelas and cellulitis, leading to hospitalization were reported more frequently in patients treated with Prolia (< 0.1% placebo vs. 0.4% Prolia). The incidence of opportunistic infections was similar to that reported with placebo. Dermatologic Reactions A significantly higher number of patients treated with Prolia developed epidermal and dermal adverse events (such as dermatitis, eczema, and rashes), with these events reported in 8.2% of the placebo and 10.8% of the Prolia groups (p < 0.0001). Most of these events were not specific to the injection site [ s ee Warnings and Precautions ( 5.8 )] . Osteonecrosis of the Jaw ONJ has been reported in the osteoporosis clinical trial program in patients treated with Prolia [ s ee Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4 )] . Atypical Subtrochanteric and Diaphyseal Fracture s In the osteoporosis clinical trial program, atypical femoral fractures were reported in patients treated with Prolia. The duration of Prolia exposure to time of atypical femoral fracture diagnosis was as early as 2½ years [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5 )]. Multiple Vertebral Fractures (MVF) Following Discontinuation of Prolia Treatment In the osteoporosis clinical trial program, multiple vertebral fractures were reported in patients after discontinuation of Prolia. In the phase 3 trial in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, 6% of women who discontinued Prolia and remained in the study developed new vertebral fractures, and 3% of women who discontinued Prolia and remained in the study developed multiple new vertebral fractures. The mean time to onset of multiple vertebral fractures was 17 months (range: 7-43 months) after the last injection of Prolia. Prior vertebral fracture was a predictor of multiple vertebral fractures after discontinuation [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.6 )]. Pancreatitis Pancreatitis was reported in 4 patients (0.1%) in the placebo and 8 patients (0.2%) in the Prolia groups. Of these reports, 1 patient in the placebo group and all 8 patients in the Prolia group had serious events, including one death in the Prolia group. Several patients had a prior history of pancreatitis. The time from product administration to event occurrence was variable. New Malignancies The overall incidence of new malignancies was 4.3% in the placebo and 4.8% in the Prolia groups. New malignancies related to the breast (0.7% placebo vs. 0.9% Prolia), reproductive system (0.2% placebo vs. 0.5% Prolia), and gastrointestinal system (0.6% placebo vs. 0.9% Prolia) were reported. A causal relationship to drug exposure has not been established. Treatment to Increase Bone Mass in Men with Osteoporosis The safety of Prolia in the treatment of men with osteoporosis was assessed in a 1-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. A total of 120 men were exposed to placebo and 120 men were exposed to Prolia administered subcutaneously once every 6 months as a single 60 mg dose. All men were instructed to take at least 1000 mg of calcium and 800 IU of vitamin D supplementation per day. The incidence of all-cause mortality was 0.8% (n = 1) in the placebo group and 0.8% (n = 1) in the Prolia group. The incidence of nonfatal serious adverse events was 7.5% in the placebo group and 8.3% in the Prolia group. The percentage of patients who withdrew from the study due to adverse events was 0% and 2.5% for the placebo and Prolia groups, respectively. Adverse reactions reported in ≥ 5% of men with osteoporosis and more frequently with Prolia than in the placebo-treated patients were: back pain (6.7% placebo vs. 8.3% Prolia), arthralgia (5.8% placebo vs. 6.7% Prolia), and nasopharyngitis (5.8% placebo vs. 6.7% Prolia). Serious Infections Serious infection was reported in 1 patient (0.8%) in the placebo group and no patients in the Prolia group. Dermatologic Reactions Epidermal and dermal adverse events (such as dermatitis, eczema, and rashes) were reported in 4 patients (3.3%) in the placebo group and 5 patients (4.2%) in the Prolia group. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw No cases of ONJ were reported. Pancreatitis Pancreatitis was reported in 1 patient (0.8%) in the placebo group and 1 patient (0.8%) in the Prolia group. New Malignancies New malignancies were reported in no patients in the placebo group and 4 (3.3%) patients (3 prostate cancers, 1 basal cell carcinoma) in the Prolia group. Treatment of Glucocorticoid -Induced Osteoporosis The safety of Prolia in the treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis was assessed in the 1-year, primary analysis of a 2-year randomized, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, active-controlled study of 795 patients (30% men and 70% women) aged 20 to 94 (mean age of 63 years) treated with greater than or equal to 7.5 mg/day oral prednisone (or equivalent). A total of 384 patients were exposed to 5 mg oral daily bisphosphonate (active-control) and 394 patients were exposed to Prolia administered once every 6 months as a 60 mg subcutaneous dose. All patients were instructed to take at least 1000 mg of calcium and 800 IU of vitamin D supplementation per day. The incidence of all-cause mortality was 0.5% (n = 2) in the active-control group and 1.5% (n = 6) in the Prolia group. The incidence of serious adverse events was 17% in the active-control group and 16% in the Prolia group. The percentage of patients who withdrew from the study due to adverse events was 3.6% and 3.8% for the active-control and Prolia groups, respectively. Adverse reactions reported in ≥ 2% of patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and more frequently with Prolia than in the active-control-treated patients are shown in the table below. Table 2. Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥ 2% of Patients with Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis and More Frequently with Prolia than in Active-Control-treated Patients Preferred Term Prolia (N = 394) n (%) Oral Daily Bisphosphonate (Active-Control) (N = 384) n (%) Back pain 18 (4.6) 17 (4.4) Hypertension 15 (3.8) 13 (3.4) Bronchitis 15 (3.8) 11 (2.9) Headache 14 (3.6) 7 (1.8) Dyspepsia 12 (3.0) 10 (2.6) Urinary tract infection 12 (3.0) 8 (2.1) Abdominal pain upper 12 (3.0) 7 (1.8) Upper respiratory tract infection 11 (2.8) 10 (2.6) Constipation 11 (2.8) 6 (1.6) Vomiting 10 (2.5) 6 (1.6) Dizziness 9 (2.3) 8 (2.1) Fall 8 (2.0) 7 (1.8) Polymyalgia rheumatica* 8 (2.0) 1 (0.3) *Events of worsening of underlying polymyalgia rheumatica. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw No cases of ONJ were reported. Atypical Subtrochanteric and Diaphyseal Fractures Atypical femoral fractures were reported in 1 patient treated with Prolia. The duration of Prolia exposure to time of atypical femoral fracture diagnosis was at 8.0 months [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5 )]. Serious Infections Serious infection was reported in 15 patients (3.9%) in the active-control group and 17 patients (4.3%) in the Prolia group. Dermatologic Reactions Epidermal and dermal adverse events (such as dermatitis, eczema, and rashes) were reported in 16 patients (4.2%) in the active-control group and 15 patients (3.8%) in the Prolia group. Treatment of Bone Loss in Patients Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer or Adjuvant Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy for Breast Cancer The safety of Prolia in the treatment of bone loss in men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was assessed in a 3-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of 1468 men aged 48 to 97 years. A total of 725 men were exposed to placebo and 731 men were exposed to Prolia administered once every 6 months as a single 60 mg subcutaneous dose. All men were instructed to take at least 1000 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D supplementation per day. The incidence of serious adverse events was 30.6% in the placebo group and 34.6% in the Prolia group. The percentage of patients who withdrew from the study due to adverse events was 6.1% and 7.0% for the placebo and Prolia groups, respectively. The safety of Prolia in the treatment of bone loss in women with nonmetastatic breast cancer receiving aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy was assessed in a 2-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of 252 postmenopausal women aged 35 to 84 years. A total of 120 women were exposed to placebo and 129 women were exposed to Prolia administered once every 6 months as a single 60 mg subcutaneous dose. All women were instructed to take at least 1000 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D supplementation per day. The incidence of serious adverse events was 9.2% in the placebo group and 14.7% in the Prolia group. The percentage of patients who withdrew from the study due to adverse events was 4.2% and 0.8% for the placebo and Prolia groups, respectively. Adverse reactions reported in ≥ 10% of Prolia-treated patients receiving ADT for prostate cancer or adjuvant AI therapy for breast cancer, and more frequently than in the placebo-treated patients were: arthralgia (13.0% placebo vs. 14.3% Prolia) and back pain (10.5% placebo vs. 11.5% Prolia). Pain in extremity (7.7% placebo vs. 9.9% Prolia) and musculoskeletal pain (3.8% placebo vs. 6.0% Prolia) have also been reported in clinical trials. Additionally, in Prolia-treated men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer receiving ADT, a greater incidence of cataracts was observed (1.2% placebo vs. 4.7% Prolia). Hypocalcemia (serum calcium < 8.4 mg/dL) was reported only in Prolia-treated patients (2.4% vs. 0%) at the month 1 visit. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience Because postmarketing reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of Prolia: Drug-related hypersensitivity reactions: anaphylaxis, rash, urticaria, facial swelling, and erythema Hypocalcemia: severe symptomatic hypocalcemia Musculoskeletal pain, including severe cases Parathyroid Hormone (PTH): Marked elevation in serum PTH in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min) or receiving dialysis Multiple vertebral fractures following discontinuation of Prolia 6.3 Immunogenicity Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. Using an electrochemiluminescent bridging immunoassay, less than 1% (55 out of 8113) of patients treated with Prolia for up to 5 years tested positive for binding antibodies (including pre-existing, transient, and developing antibodies). None of the patients tested positive for neutralizing antibodies, as was assessed using a chemiluminescent cell-based in vitro biological assay. No evidence of altered pharmacokinetic profile, toxicity profile, or clinical response was associated with binding antibody development. The incidence of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of a positive antibody (including neutralizing antibody) test result may be influenced by several factors, including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of antibodies to denosumab with the incidence of antibodies to other products may be misleading.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Pregnancy must be ruled out prior to administration of Prolia (2.1) Prolia should be administered by a healthcare professional (2.2) Administer 60 mg every 6 months as a subcutaneous injection in the upper arm, upper thigh, or abdomen (2.2) Instruct patients to take calcium 1000 mg daily and at least 400 IU vitamin D daily (2.2) Plunger, Safety Guard, Window, Needle Cap, Finger Grip Step 1: Remove Grey Needle Cap Choose an injection site. The recommended injection sites for Prolia include: the upper arm OR the upper thigh OR the abdomen. Insert needle and inject all the liquid subcutaneously. Do not administer into muscle or blood vessel. Hold clear finger grip. Gently slide green safety guard over needle and lock securely in place. Do not grip green safety guard too firmly when sliding over needle. 2.1 Information Essential to Safe Dosing or Administration Pregnancy must be ruled out prior to administration of Prolia. Perform pregnancy testing in all females of reproductive potential prior to administration of Prolia. Based on findings in animals, Prolia can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1 , 8.3 )]. 2.2 Recommended Dosage Prolia should be administered by a healthcare professional. The recommended dose of Prolia is 60 mg administered as a single subcutaneous injection once every 6 months. Administer Prolia via subcutaneous injection in the upper arm, the upper thigh, or the abdomen. All patients should receive calcium 1000 mg daily and at least 400 IU vitamin D daily [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 )]. If a dose of Prolia is missed, administer the injection as soon as the patient is available. Thereafter, schedule injections every 6 months from the date of the last injection. 2.3 Preparation and Administration Visually inspect Prolia for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit. Prolia is a clear, colorless to pale yellow solution that may contain trace amounts of translucent to white proteinaceous particles. Do not use if the solution is discolored or cloudy or if the solution contains many particles or foreign particulate matter. Latex Allergy: People sensitive to latex should not handle the grey needle cap on the single-use prefilled syringe, which contains dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex). Prior to administration, Prolia may be removed from the refrigerator and brought to room temperature (up to 25°C/77°F) by standing in the original container. This generally takes 15 to 30 minutes. Do not warm Prolia in any other way [see How Supplied/Storage and Handling ( 16 )] . Instructions for Prefilled Syringe with Needle Safety Guard IMPORTANT: In order to minimize accidental needlesticks, the Prolia single-use prefilled syringe will have a green safety guard; manually activate the safety guard after the injection is given. DO NOT slide the green safety guard forward over the needle before administering the injection; it will lock in place and prevent injection. Activate the green safety guard (slide over the needle) after the injection. The grey needle cap on the single-use prefilled syringe contains dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex); people sensitive to latex should not handle the cap. Step 1: Remove Grey Needle Cap Step 2: Administer Subcutaneous Injection Choose an injection site. The recommended injection sites for Prolia include: the upper arm OR the upper thigh OR the abdomen. Insert needle and inject all the liquid subcutaneously . Do not administer into muscle or blood vessel. DO NOT put grey needle cap back on needle. Step 3: Immediately Slide Green Safety Guard Over Needle With the needle pointing away from you. Hold the prefilled syringe by the clear plastic finger grip with one hand. Then, with the other hand, grasp the green safety guard by its base and gently slide it towards the needle until the green safety guard locks securely in place and/or you hear a “click”. DO NOT grip the green safety guard too firmly - it will move easily if you hold and slide it gently. Hold clear finger grip. Gently slide green safety guard over needle and lock securely in place. Do not grip green safety guard too firmly when sliding over needle. Immediately dispose of the syringe and needle cap in the nearest sharps container. DO NOT put the needle cap back on the used syringe.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnant women and females of reproductive potential: Prolia may cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during therapy, and for at least 5 months after the last dose of Prolia (8.1, 8.3). Pediatric patients: Safety and efficacy not established (8.4) Renal impairment: No dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal impairment. Patients with creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min or receiving dialysis are at risk for hypocalcemia. Supplement with calcium and vitamin D, and consider monitoring serum calcium (8.6) 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary Prolia is contraindicated for use in pregnant women because it may cause harm to a fetus. There are insufficient data with denosumab use in pregnant women to inform any drug-associated risks for adverse developmental outcomes. In utero denosumab exposure from cynomolgus monkeys dosed monthly with denosumab throughout pregnancy at a dose 50-fold higher than the recommended human dose based on body weight resulted in increased fetal loss, stillbirths, and postnatal mortality, and absent lymph nodes, abnormal bone growth, and decreased neonatal growth [ see Data ]. Data Animal Data The effects of denosumab on prenatal development have been studied in both cynomolgus monkeys and genetically engineered mice in which RANK ligand (RANKL) expression was turned off by gene removal (a “knockout mouse”). In cynomolgus monkeys dosed subcutaneously with denosumab throughout pregnancy starting at gestational day 20 and at a pharmacologically active dose 50-fold higher than the recommended human dose based on body weight, there was increased fetal loss during gestation, stillbirths, and postnatal mortality. Other findings in offspring included absence of axillary, inguinal, mandibular, and mesenteric lymph nodes; abnormal bone growth, reduced bone strength, reduced hematopoiesis, dental dysplasia, and tooth malalignment; and decreased neonatal growth. At birth out to 1 month of age, infants had measurable blood levels of denosumab (22-621% of maternal levels). Following a recovery period from birth out to 6 months of age, the effects on bone quality and strength returned to normal; there were no adverse effects on tooth eruption, though dental dysplasia was still apparent; axillary and inguinal lymph nodes remained absent, while mandibular and mesenteric lymph nodes were present, though small; and minimal to moderate mineralization in multiple tissues was seen in one recovery animal. There was no evidence of maternal harm prior to labor; adverse maternal effects occurred infrequently during labor. Maternal mammary gland development was normal. There was no fetal NOAEL (no observable adverse effect level) established for this study because only one dose of 50 mg/kg was evaluated. Mammary gland histopathology at 6 months of age was normal in female offspring exposed to denosumab in utero; however, development and lactation have not been fully evaluated. In RANKL knockout mice, absence of RANKL (the target of denosumab) also caused fetal lymph node agenesis and led to postnatal impairment of dentition and bone growth. Pregnant RANKL knockout mice showed altered maturation of the maternal mammary gland, leading to impaired lactation [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.2 ) and Nonclinical Toxicology ( 13.2 )]. The no-effect dose for denosumab-induced teratogenicity is unknown. However, a Cmax of 22.9 ng/mL was identified in cynomolgus monkeys as a level in which no biologic effects (NOEL) of denosumab were observed (no inhibition of RANKL) [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3 )]. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There is no information regarding the presence of denosumab in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Denosumab was detected in the maternal milk of cynomolgus monkeys up to 1 month after the last dose of denosumab (≤ 0.5% milk:serum ratio) and maternal mammary gland development was normal, with no impaired lactation. However, pregnant RANKL knockout mice showed altered maturation of the maternal mammary gland, leading to impaired lactation [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1 ), Nonclinical Toxicology ( 13.2 )]. 8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential Based on findings in animals, Prolia can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1 )]. Pregnancy Testing Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiating Prolia treatment. Contraception Females Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during therapy, and for at least 5 months after the last dose of Prolia. Males Denosumab was present at low concentrations (approximately 2% of serum exposure) in the seminal fluid of male subjects given Prolia. Following vaginal intercourse, the maximum amount of denosumab delivered to a female partner would result in exposures approximately 11,000 times lower than the prescribed 60 mg subcutaneous dose, and at least 38 times lower than the NOEL in monkeys. Therefore, male condom use would not be necessary as it is unlikely that a female partner or fetus would be exposed to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of denosumab via seminal fluid [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3 )]. 8.4 Pediatric Use Prolia is not recommended in pediatric patients younger than age 4 years because of the high rates of skeletal growth and the potential for Prolia to negatively affect long-bone growth and dentition. The safety and effectiveness of Prolia in pediatric patients have not been established. Treatment with Prolia may impair bone growth in children with open growth plates and may inhibit eruption of dentition. In neonatal rats, inhibition of RANKL (the target of Prolia therapy) with a construct of osteoprotegerin bound to Fc (OPG-Fc) at doses ≤ 10 mg/kg was associated with inhibition of bone growth and tooth eruption. Adolescent primates treated with denosumab at doses 10 and 50 times (10 and 50 mg/kg dose) higher than the recommended human dose of 60 mg administered every 6 months, based on body weight (mg/kg), had abnormal growth plates, considered to be consistent with the pharmacological activity of denosumab. Cynomolgus monkeys exposed in utero to denosumab exhibited bone abnormalities, an absence of axillary, inguinal, mandibular, and mesenteric lymph nodes, reduced hematopoiesis, tooth malalignment, and decreased neonatal growth. Some bone abnormalities recovered once exposure was ceased following birth; however, axillary and inguinal lymph nodes remained absent 6 months post-birth [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1 ) ]. 8.5 Geriatric Use Of the total number of patients in clinical studies of Prolia, 9943 patients (76%) were ≥ 65 years old, while 3576 (27%) were ≥ 75 years old. Of the patients in the osteoporosis study in men, 133 patients (55%) were ≥ 65 years old, while 39 patients (16%) were ≥ 75 years old. Of the patients in the glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis study, 355 patients (47%) were ≥ 65 years old, while 132 patients (17%) were ≥ 75 years old. No overall differences in safety or efficacy were observed between these patients and younger patients, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. 8.6 Renal Impairment No dose adjustment is necessary in patients with renal impairment. In clinical studies, patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min) or receiving dialysis were at greater risk of developing hypocalcemia. Consider the benefit-risk profile when administering Prolia to patients with severe renal impairment or receiving dialysis. Clinical monitoring of calcium and mineral levels (phosphorus and magnesium) is highly recommended. Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D is important in patients with severe renal impairment or receiving dialysis [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 ) , Adverse Reactions ( 6.1 ), and Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3 ) ]. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment No clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of Prolia.

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Category Value
Authorisation number BLA125320
Agency product number 4EQZ6YO2HI
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 55513-710
Date Last Revised 04-06-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 993452
Marketing authorisation holder Amgen Inc