Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 16 April 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE LATUDA is indicated for: Treatment of adult and adolescent patients (13 to 17 years) with schizophrenia [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. Monotherapy treatment of adult and pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) with major depressive episode associated with bipolar I disorder (bipolar depression) [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. Adjunctive treatment with lithium or valproate in adult patients with major depressive episode associated with bipolar I disorder (bipolar depression) [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. LATUDA is an atypical antipsychotic indicated for the treatment of: Schizophrenia in adults and adolescents (13 to 17 years) ( 1, 14.1) Depressive episode associated with Bipolar I Disorder (bipolar depression) in adults and pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) as monotherapy (1, 14.2) Depressive episode associated with Bipolar I Disorder (bipolar depression) in adults as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate (1, 14.2)

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Known hypersensitivity to lurasidone HCl or any components in the formulation. Angioedema has been observed with lurasidone [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., ketoconazole, clarithromycin, ritonavir, voriconazole, mibefradil, etc.) [see Drug Interactions (7.1)]. Strong CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., rifampin, avasimibe, St. John's wort, phenytoin, carbamazepine, etc.) [see Drug Interactions (7.1)]. Known hypersensitivity to LATUDA or any components in the formulation (4). Concomitant use with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor (e.g., ketoconazole) (2.6, 4, 7.1). Concomitant use with a strong CYP3A4 inducer (e.g., rifampin) (2.6, 4, 7.1).
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following adverse reactions are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling: Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis [see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors [see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Cerebrovascular Adverse Reactions, Including Stroke, in Elderly Patients with Dementia-related Psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] Tardive Dyskinesia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)] Metabolic Changes [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)] Hyperprolactinemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.7)] Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)] Orthostatic Hypotension and Syncope [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)] Falls [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10)] Seizures [see Warnings and Precautions (5.11)] Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)] Body Temperature Dysregulation [see Warnings and Precautions (5.13)] Activation of Mania/Hypomania [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14)] Dysphagia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15)] Neurological Adverse Reactions in Patients with Parkinson's Disease or Dementia with Lewy Bodies [see Warnings and Precautions (5.16)] Commonly observed adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 5% and at least twice the rate for placebo) were (6.1): Adult patients with schizophrenia: somnolence, akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms, and nausea Adolescent patients (13-17 years) with schizophrenia: somnolence, nausea, akathisia, EPS (non-akathisia), rhinitis (80mg only), and vomiting Adult patients with bipolar depression: akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms, and somnolence Pediatric patients (10-17 years) with bipolar depression: nausea, weight increase, and insomnia. To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. at 1-877-737-7226 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch . 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice. Adults The information below is derived from an integrated clinical study database for LATUDA consisting of 3799 adult patients exposed to one or more doses of LATUDA for the treatment of schizophrenia, and bipolar depression in placebo-controlled studies. This experience corresponds with a total experience of 1250.9 patient-years. A total of 1106 LATUDA-treated patients had at least 24 weeks and 371 LATUDA-treated patients had at least 52 weeks of exposure. Adverse events during exposure to study treatment were obtained by general inquiry and voluntarily reported adverse experiences, as well as results from physical examinations, vital signs, ECGs, weights and laboratory investigations. Adverse experiences were recorded by clinical investigators using their own terminology. In order to provide a meaningful estimate of the proportion of individuals experiencing adverse events, events were grouped in standardized categories using MedDRA terminology. Schizophrenia The following findings are based on the short-term, placebo-controlled premarketing adult studies for schizophrenia in which LATUDA was administered at daily doses ranging from 20 to 160 mg (n=1508). Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 5% and at least twice the rate of placebo) in patients treated with LATUDA were somnolence, akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms, and nausea. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment: A total of 9.5% (143/1508) LATUDA-treated patients and 9.3% (66/708) of placebo-treated patients discontinued due to adverse reactions. There were no adverse reactions associated with discontinuation in subjects treated with LATUDA that were at least 2% and at least twice the placebo rate. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More in LATUDA-Treated Patients: Adverse reactions associated with the use of LATUDA (incidence of 2% or greater, rounded to the nearest percent and LATUDA incidence greater than placebo) that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in patients with schizophrenia) are shown in Table 19. Table 19: Adverse Reactions in 2% or More of LATUDA-Treated Patients and That Occurred at Greater Incidence than in the Placebo-Treated Patients in Adult Short-term Schizophrenia Studies Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer * Somnolence includes adverse event terms: hypersomnia, hypersomnolence, sedation, and somnolence ** Extrapyramidal symptoms include adverse event terms: bradykinesia, cogwheel rigidity, drooling, dystonia, extrapyramidal disorder, hypokinesia, muscle rigidity, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, parkinsonism, psychomotor retardation, tongue spasm, torticollis, tremor, and trismus Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction LATUDA Body System or Organ Class Placebo (N=708) (%) 20 mg/day (N=71) (%) 40 mg/day (N=487) (%) 80 mg/day (N=538) (%) 120 mg/day (N=291) (%) 160 mg/day (N=121) (%) All LATUDA (N=1508) (%) Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 5 11 10 9 13 7 10 Vomiting 6 7 6 9 9 7 8 Dyspepsia 5 11 6 5 8 6 6 Salivary Hypersecretion <1 1 1 2 4 2 2 Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders Back Pain 2 0 4 3 4 0 3 Nervous System Disorders Somnolence* 7 15 16 15 26 8 17 Akathisia 3 6 11 12 22 7 13 Extrapyramidal Disorder** 6 6 11 12 22 13 14 Dizziness 2 6 4 4 5 6 4 Psychiatric Disorders Insomnia 8 8 10 11 9 7 10 Agitation 4 10 7 3 6 5 5 Anxiety 4 3 6 4 7 3 5 Restlessness 1 1 3 1 3 2 2 Dose-Related Adverse Reactions in the Schizophrenia Studies Akathisia and extrapyramidal symptoms were dose-related. The frequency of akathisia increased with dose up to 120 mg/day (5.6% for LATUDA 20 mg, 10.7% for LATUDA 40 mg, 12.3% for LATUDA 80 mg, and 22.0% for LATUDA 120 mg). Akathisia was reported by 7.4% (9/121) of patients receiving 160 mg/day. Akathisia occurred in 3.0% of subjects receiving placebo. The frequency of extrapyramidal symptoms increased with dose up to 120 mg/day (5.6% for LATUDA 20 mg, 11.5% for LATUDA 40 mg, 11.9% for LATUDA 80 mg, and 22.0% for LATUDA 120 mg). Bipolar Depression (Monotherapy) The following findings are based on the adult short-term, placebo-controlled premarketing study for bipolar depression in which LATUDA was administered at daily doses ranging from 20 to 120 mg (n=331). Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥5%, in either dose group, and at least twice the rate of placebo) in patients treated with LATUDA were akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms, somnolence, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and anxiety. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment: A total of 6.0% (20/331) LATUDA-treated patients and 5.4% (9/168) of placebo-treated patients discontinued due to adverse reactions. There were no adverse reactions associated with discontinuation in subjects treated with LATUDA that were at least 2% and at least twice the placebo rate. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More in LATUDA-Treated Patients: Adverse reactions associated with the use of LATUDA (incidence of 2% or greater, rounded to the nearest percent and LATUDA incidence greater than placebo) that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in patients with bipolar depression) are shown in Table 20. Table 20: Adverse Reactions in 2% or More of LATUDA-Treated Patients and That Occurred at Greater Incidence than in the Placebo-Treated Patients in the Adult Short-term Monotherapy Bipolar Depression Study Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer *Extrapyramidal symptoms include adverse event terms: bradykinesia, cogwheel rigidity, drooling, dystonia, extrapyramidal disorder, glabellar reflex abnormal, hypokinesia, muscle rigidity, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, parkinsonism, psychomotor retardation, tongue spasm, torticollis, tremor, and trismus ** Somnolence includes adverse event terms: hypersomnia, hypersomnolence, sedation, and somnolence Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction Body System or Organ Class Dictionary-derived Term Placebo (N=168) (%) LATUDA 20-60 mg/day (N=164) (%) LATUDA 80-120 mg/day (N=167) (%) All LATUDA(N=331) (%) Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 8 10 17 14 Dry Mouth 4 6 4 5 Vomiting 2 2 6 4 Diarrhea 2 5 3 4 Infections and Infestations Nasopharyngitis 1 4 4 4 Influenza 1 <1 2 2 Urinary Tract Infection <1 2 1 2 Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders Back Pain <1 3 <1 2 Nervous System Disorders Extrapyramidal Symptoms* 2 5 9 7 Akathisia 2 8 11 9 Somnolence** 7 7 14 11 Psychiatric Disorders Anxiety 1 4 5 4 Dose-Related Adverse Reactions in the Monotherapy Study: In the adult short-term, placebo-controlled study (involving lower and higher LATUDA dose ranges) [see Clinical Studies (14.2)] the adverse reactions that occurred with a greater than 5% incidence in the patients treated with LATUDA in any dose group and greater than placebo in both groups were nausea (10.4%, 17.4%), somnolence (7.3%, 13.8%), akathisia (7.9%, 10.8%), and extrapyramidal symptoms (4.9%, 9.0%) for LATUDA 20 to 60 mg/day and LATUDA 80 to 120 mg/day, respectively. Bipolar Depression Adjunctive Therapy with Lithium or Valproate The following findings are based on two adult short-term, placebo-controlled premarketing studies for bipolar depression in which LATUDA was administered at daily doses ranging from 20 to 120 mg as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate (n=360). Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥5% and at least twice the rate of placebo) in subjects treated with LATUDA were akathisia and somnolence. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment: A total of 5.8% (21/360) LATUDA-treated patients and 4.8% (16/334) of placebo-treated patients discontinued due to adverse reactions. There were no adverse reactions associated with discontinuation in subjects treated with LATUDA that were at least 2% and at least twice the placebo rate. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More in LATUDA-Treated Patients: Adverse reactions associated with the use of LATUDA (incidence of 2% or greater, rounded to the nearest percent and LATUDA incidence greater than placebo) that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in patients with bipolar depression) are shown in Table 21. Table 21: Adverse Reactions in 2% or More of LATUDA-Treated Patients and That Occurred at Greater Incidence than in the Placebo-Treated Patients in the Adult Short-term Adjunctive Therapy Bipolar Depression Studies Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer *Extrapyramidal symptoms include adverse event terms: bradykinesia, cogwheel rigidity, drooling, dystonia, extrapyramidal disorder, glabellar reflex abnormal, hypokinesia, muscle rigidity, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, parkinsonism, psychomotor retardation, tongue spasm, torticollis, tremor, and trismus ** Somnolence includes adverse event terms: hypersomnia, hypersomnolence, sedation, and somnolence Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction Body System or Organ Class Dictionary-derived Term Placebo (N=334) (%) LATUDA 20 to 120 mg/day (N=360) (%) Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 10 14 Vomiting 1 4 General Disorders Fatigue 1 3 Infections and Infestations Nasopharyngitis 2 4 Investigations Weight Increased <1 3 Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders Increased Appetite 1 3 Nervous System Disorders Extrapyramidal Symptoms* 9 14 Somnolence** 5 11 Akathisia 5 11 Psychiatric Disorders Restlessness <1 4 Adolescents Schizophrenia The following findings are based on the short-term, placebo-controlled adolescent study for schizophrenia in which LATUDA was administered at daily doses ranging from 40 (N=110) to 80 mg (N=104). Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥5% and at least twice the rate of placebo) in adolescent patients (13 to 17 years) treated with LATUDA were somnolence, nausea, akathisia, extrapyramidal symptoms (non-akathisia, 40mg only), vomiting, and rhinorrhea/rhinitis (80mg only). Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment: The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between LATUDA- and placebo-treated adolescent patients (13 to 17 years) was 4% and 8%, respectively. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More in LATUDA-Treated Patients: Adverse reactions associated with the use of LATUDA (incidence of 2% or greater, rounded to the nearest percent and LATUDA incidence greater than placebo) that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6-weeks in adolescent patients with schizophrenia) are shown in Table 22. Table 22: Adverse Reactions in 2% or More of LATUDA-Treated Patients and That Occurred at Greater Incidence than in the Placebo-Treated Patients in the Adolescent Short-term Schizophrenia Study Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer * Somnolence includes adverse event terms: hypersomnia, sedation, and somnolence ** Viral Infection includes adverse event terms: nasopharyngitis, influenza, viral infection, upper respiratory tract infection *** Rhinitis incudes adverse event terms: rhinitis, allergic rhinitis, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction Body System or Organ Class Dictionary-derived Term Placebo (N=112) LATUDA 40 mg/day (N=110) LATUDA 80 mg/day (N=104) All LATUDA (N=214) Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 3 13 14 14 Vomiting 2 8 6 8 Diarrhea 1 3 5 4 Dry Mouth 0 2 3 2 Infections and Infestations Viral Infection** 6 11 10 10 Rhinitis*** 2 <1 8 4 Oropharyngeal pain 0 <1 3 2 Tachycardia 0 0 3 1 Nervous System Disorders Somnolence* 7 15 13 15 Akathisia 2 9 9 9 Dizziness 1 5 5 5 Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) Bipolar Depression The following findings are based on the 6-week , placebo-controlled study for bipolar depression in pediatric patients 10 to 17 years in which LATUDA was administered at daily doses ranging from 20 to 80 mg (N=175). Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥5%, and at least twice the rate of placebo) in pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) treated with LATUDA were nausea, weight increase, and insomnia. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment: The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between LATUDA- and placebo-treated pediatric patients 10 to 17 years was 2% and 2%, respectively. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of 2% or More in LATUDA-Treated Patients: Adverse reactions associated with the use of LATUDA (incidence of 2% or greater, rounded to the nearest percent and LATUDA incidence greater than placebo) that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in pediatric patients with bipolar depression) are shown in Table 23. Table 23: Adverse Reactions in 2% or More of LATUDA-Treated Patients and That Occurred at Greater Incidence than in the Placebo-Treated Patients in the 6-Week Bipolar Depression Study in Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer *Somnolence includes adverse event terms: hypersomnia, hypersomnolence, sedation, and somnolence **EPS includes adverse event terms: akathisia, cogwheel rigidity, dyskinesia, dystonia, hyperkinesia, joint stiffness, muscle rigidity, muscle spasms, musculoskeletal stiffness, oculogyric crisis, parkinsonism, tardive dyskinesia, and tremor Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction Body System or Organ Class Dictionary-derived Term Placebo (N=172) LATUDA 20 to 80 mg/day (N=175) Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 6 16 Vomiting 4 6 Abdominal Pain Upper 2 3 Diarrhea 2 3 Abdominal Pain 1 3 General Disorders And Administration Site Conditions Fatigue 2 3 Investigations Weight Increased 2 7 Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders Decreased Appetite 2 4 Nervous System Disorders Somnolence* 6 11 Extrapyramidal symptoms** 5 6 Dizziness 5 6 Psychiatric Disorders Insomnia 2 5 Abnormal Dreams 2 2 Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders Oropharyngeal Pain 2 2 Extrapyramidal Symptoms Schizophrenia Adults In the short-term, placebo-controlled schizophrenia studies, for LATUDA-treated patients, the incidence of reported events related to extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), excluding akathisia and restlessness, was 13.5% and 5.8% for placebo-treated patients. The incidence of akathisia for LATUDA-treated patients was 12.9% and 3.0% for placebo-treated patients. Incidence of EPS by dose is provided in Table 24. Table 24: Incidence of EPS Compared to Placebo in Adult Schizophrenia Studies Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer * Dystonia includes adverse event terms: dystonia, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, tongue spasm, torticollis, and trismus ** Parkinsonism includes adverse event terms: bradykinesia, cogwheel rigidity, drooling, extrapyramidal disorder, hypokinesia, muscle rigidity, parkinsonism, psychomotor retardation, and tremor LATUDA Adverse Event Term Placebo (N=708) (%) 20 mg/day (N=71) (%) 40 mg/day (N=487) (%) 80 mg/day (N=538) (%) 120 mg/day (N=291) (%) 160 mg/day (N=121) (%) All EPS events 9 10 21 23 39 20 All EPS events, excluding Akathisia/Restlessness 6 6 11 12 22 13 Akathisia 3 6 11 12 22 7 Dystonia* <1 0 4 5 7 2 Parkinsonism** 5 6 9 8 17 11 Restlessness 1 1 3 1 3 2 Adolescents In the short-term, placebo-controlled, study of schizophrenia in adolescents, the incidence of EPS, excluding events related to akathisia, for LATUDA-treated patients was higher in the 40 mg (10%) and the 80 mg (7.7%) treatment groups vs. placebo (3.6%); and the incidence of akathisia-related events for LATUDA-treated patients was 8.9% vs. 1.8% for placebo-treated patients. Incidence of EPS by dose is provided in Table 25. Table 25: Incidence of EPS Compared to Placebo in the Adolescent Schizophrenia Study Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer * Dystonia includes adverse event terms: dystonia, trismus, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, tongue spasm, and torticollis ** Parkinsonism includes adverse event terms: bradykinesia, drooling, extrapyramidal disorder, glabellar reflex abnormal, hypokinesia, parkinsonism, and psychomotor retardation LATUDA Adverse Event Term Placebo (N=112) (%) 40 mg/day (N=110) (%) 80 mg/day (N=104) (%) All EPS events 5 14 14 All EPS events, excluding Akathisia/Restlessness 4 7 7 Akathisia 2 9 9 Parkinsonism** <1 4 0 Dyskinesia <1 <1 1 Dystonia* 0 <1 1 Bipolar Depression Adults Monotherapy In the adult short-term, placebo-controlled monotherapy bipolar depression study, for LATUDA-treated patients, the incidence of reported events related to EPS, excluding akathisia and restlessness was 6.9% and 2.4% for placebo-treated patients. The incidence of akathisia for LATUDA-treated patients was 9.4% and 2.4% for placebo-treated patients. Incidence of EPS by dose groups is provided in Table 26. Table 26: Incidence of EPS Compared to Placebo in the Adult Monotherapy Bipolar Depression Study Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer * Dystonia includes adverse event terms: dystonia, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, tongue spasm, torticollis, and trismus ** Parkinsonism includes adverse event terms: bradykinesia, cogwheel rigidity, drooling, extrapyramidal disorder, glabellar reflex abnormal, hypokinesia, muscle rigidity, parkinsonism, psychomotor retardation, and tremor LATUDA Adverse Event Term Placebo (N=168) (%) 20 to 60 mg/day (N=164) (%) 80 to 120 mg/day (N=167) (%) All EPS events 5 12 20 All EPS events, excluding Akathisia/Restlessness 2 5 9 Akathisia 2 8 11 Dystonia* 0 0 2 Parkinsonism** 2 5 8 Restlessness <1 0 3 Adjunctive Therapy with Lithium or Valproate In the adult short-term, placebo-controlled adjunctive therapy bipolar depression studies, for LATUDA-treated patients, the incidence of EPS, excluding akathisia and restlessness, was 13.9% and 8.7% for placebo. The incidence of akathisia for LATUDA-treated patients was 10.8% and 4.8% for placebo-treated patients. Incidence of EPS is provided in Table 27. Table 27: Incidence of EPS Compared to Placebo in the Adult Adjunctive Therapy Bipolar Depression Studies Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer * Dystonia includes adverse event terms: dystonia, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, tongue spasm, torticollis, and trismus ** Parkinsonism includes adverse event terms: bradykinesia, cogwheel rigidity, drooling, extrapyramidal disorder, glabellar reflex abnormal, hypokinesia, muscle rigidity, parkinsonism, psychomotor retardation, and tremor Adverse Event Term Placebo (N=334) (%) LATUDA 20 to 120 mg/day (N=360) (%) All EPS events 13 24 All EPS events, excluding Akathisia/Restlessness 9 14 Akathisia 5 11 Dystonia* <1 1 Parkinsonism** 8 13 Restlessness <1 4 In the short-term, placebo-controlled schizophrenia and bipolar depression studies, data was objectively collected on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (SAS) for extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), the Barnes Akathisia Scale (BAS) for akathisia and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) for dyskinesias. Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) In the 6-week, placebo-controlled study of bipolar depression in pediatric patients 10 to 17 years, the incidence of EPS, excluding events related to akathisia, for LATUDA-treated patients was similar in the LATUDA 20 to 80 mg/day (3.4%) treatment group vs. placebo (3.5%); and the incidence of akathisia-related events for LATUDA-treated patients was 2.9% vs. 3.5% for placebo-treated patients. Incidence of EPS by dose is provided in Table 28. Table 28: Incidence of EPS Compared to Placebo in the Bipolar Depression Study in Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) Note: Figures rounded to the nearest integer * EPS include adverse event terms: akathisia, cogwheel rigidity, dyskinesia, dystonia, hyperkinesia, joint stiffness, muscle rigidity, muscle spasms, musculoskeletal stiffness, oculogyric crisis, parkinsonism, tardive dyskinesia, and tremor ** Parkinsonism includes adverse event terms: bradykinesia, drooling, extrapyramidal disorder, glabellar reflex abnormal, hypokinesia, parkinsonism, and psychomotor retardation ***Dystonia includes adverse event terms: dystonia, oculogyric crisis, oromandibular dystonia, tongue spasm, torticollis, and trismus Adverse Event Term Placebo (N=172) (%) LATUDA 20 to 80 mg/day (N=175) (%) All EPS events* 5 6 All EPS events, excluding Akathisia/Restlessness 4 3 Akathisia 4 3 Parkinsonism** <1 <1 Dystonia*** 1 <1 Salivary hypersecretion <1 <1 Psychomotor hyperactivity 0 <1 Tardive Dyskinesia <1 0 Schizophrenia Adults The mean change from baseline for LATUDA-treated patients for the SAS, BAS and AIMS was comparable to placebo-treated patients, with the exception of the Barnes Akathisia Scale global score (LATUDA, 0.1; placebo, 0.0). The percentage of patients who shifted from normal to abnormal was greater in LATUDA-treated patients and placebo for the BAS (LATUDA, 14.4%; placebo, 7.1%), the SAS (LATUDA, 5.0%; placebo, 2.3%) and the AIMS (LATUDA, 7.4%; placebo, 5.8%). Adolescents The mean change from baseline for LATUDA- treated patients with adolescent schizophrenia for the SAS, BAS and AIMS was comparable to placebo-treated patients. The percentage of patients who shifted from normal to abnormal was greater in LATUDA-treated patients and placebo for the BAS (LATUDA, 7.0%; placebo, 1.8%), the SAS (LATUDA, 8.3%; placebo, 2.7%) and the AIMS (LATUDA, 2.8%; placebo, 0.9%). Bipolar Depression Adults Monotherapy The mean change from baseline for LATUDA-treated adult patients for the SAS, BAS and AIMS was comparable to placebo-treated patients. The percentage of patients who shifted from normal to abnormal was greater in LATUDA-treated patients and placebo for the BAS (LATUDA, 8.4%; placebo, 5.6%), the SAS (LATUDA, 3.7%; placebo, 1.9%) and the AIMS (LATUDA, 3.4%; placebo, 1.2%). Adjunctive Therapy with Lithium or Valproate The mean change from baseline for LATUDA-treated adult patients for the SAS, BAS and AIMS was comparable to placebo-treated patients. The percentage of patients who shifted from normal to abnormal was greater in LATUDA-treated patients and placebo for the BAS (LATUDA, 8.7%; placebo, 2.1%), the SAS (LATUDA, 2.8%; placebo, 2.1%) and the AIMS (LATUDA, 2.8%; placebo, 0.6%). Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) The mean change from baseline for LATUDA- treated pediatric patients 10 to 17 years with bipolar depression for the SAS, BAS and AIMS was comparable to placebo-treated patients. The percentage of patients who shifted from normal to abnormal was greater in LATUDA-treated patients and placebo for the BAS (LATUDA, 4.6%; placebo, 2.4%), the SAS (LATUDA, 0.6%; placebo, 0%) and was the same for the AIMS (LATUDA, 0%; placebo, 0%). Dystonia Class Effect: Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment. Dystonic symptoms include: spasm of the neck muscles, sometimes progressing to tightness of the throat, swallowing difficulty, difficulty breathing, and/or protrusion of the tongue. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, they occur more frequently and with greater severity with high potency and at higher doses of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. An elevated risk of acute dystonia is observed in males and younger age groups. Schizophrenia Adults In the short-term, placebo-controlled schizophrenia clinical studies, dystonia occurred in 4.2% of LATUDA-treated subjects (0.0% LATUDA 20 mg, 3.5% LATUDA 40 mg, 4.5% LATUDA 80 mg, 6.5% LATUDA 120 mg and 2.5% LATUDA 160 mg) compared to 0.8% of subjects receiving placebo. Seven subjects (0.5%, 7/1508) discontinued clinical trials due to dystonic events – four were receiving LATUDA 80 mg/day and three were receiving LATUDA 120 mg/day. Adolescents In the short-term, placebo-controlled, adolescent schizophrenia study, dystonia occurred in 1% of LATUDA-treated patients (1% LATUDA 40 mg and 1% LATUDA 80 mg) compared to 0% of patients receiving placebo. No patients discontinued the clinical study due to dystonic events. Bipolar Depression Adults Monotherapy In the adult short-term, flexible-dose, placebo-controlled monotherapy bipolar depression study, dystonia occurred in 0.9% of LATUDA-treated subjects (0.0% and 1.8% for LATUDA 20 to 60 mg/day and LATUDA 80 to 120 mg/day, respectively) compared to 0.0% of subjects receiving placebo. No subject discontinued the clinical study due to dystonic events. Adjunctive Therapy with Lithium or Valproate In the adult short-term, flexible-dose, placebo-controlled adjunctive therapy bipolar depression studies, dystonia occurred in 1.1% of LATUDA-treated subjects (20 to 120 mg) compared to 0.6% of subjects receiving placebo. No subject discontinued the clinical study due to dystonic events. Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) In the 6-week, placebo-controlled bipolar depression study in pediatric patients 10 to 17 years, dystonia occurred in 0.6% of LATUDA-treated patients compared to 1.2% of patients receiving placebo. No patients discontinued the clinical study due to dystonic events. Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Premarketing Evaluation of LATUDA Following is a list of adverse reactions reported by adult patients treated with LATUDA at multiple doses of ≥ 20 mg once daily within the premarketing database of 2905 patients with schizophrenia. The reactions listed are those that could be of clinical importance, as well as reactions that are plausibly drug-related on pharmacologic or other grounds. Reactions listed in Table 19 or those that appear elsewhere in the LATUDA label are not included. Reactions are further categorized by organ class and listed in order of decreasing frequency according to the following definitions: those occurring in at least 1/100 patients (frequent) (only those not already listed in the tabulated results from placebo-controlled studies appear in this listing); those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients (infrequent); and those occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients (rare). Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: Infrequent: anemia Cardiac Disorders: Frequent: tachycardia; Infrequent: AV block 1st degree, angina pectoris, bradycardia Ear and Labyrinth Disorders: Infrequent: vertigo Eye Disorders: Frequent: blurred vision Gastrointestinal Disorders: Frequent: abdominal pain, diarrhea; Infrequent: gastritis General Disorders and Administrative Site Conditions: Rare: sudden death Investigations: Frequent: CPK increased Metabolism and Nutritional System Disorders: Frequent: decreased appetite Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: Rare: rhabdomyolysis Nervous System Disorders: Infrequent: cerebrovascular accident, dysarthria Psychiatric Disorders: Infrequent: abnormal dreams, panic attack, sleep disorder Renal and Urinary Disorders: Infrequent: dysuria; Rare: renal failure Reproductive System and Breast Disorders: Infrequent: amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea; Rare: breast enlargement, breast pain, galactorrhea, erectile dysfunction Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: Frequent: rash, pruritus; Rare: angioedema Vascular Disorders: Frequent: hypertension Clinical Laboratory Changes Schizophrenia Adults Serum Creatinine: In short-term, placebo-controlled trials, the mean change from Baseline in serum creatinine was +0.05 mg/dL for LATUDA-treated patients compared to +0.02 mg/dL for placebo-treated patients. A creatinine shift from normal to high occurred in 3.0% (43/1453) of LATUDA-treated patients and 1.6% (11/681) on placebo. The threshold for high creatinine value varied from > 0.79 to > 1.3 mg/dL based on the centralized laboratory definition for each study (Table 29). Table 29: Serum Creatinine Shifts from Normal at Baseline to High at Study End-Point in Adult Schizophrenia Studies Laboratory Parameter Placebo (N=708) LATUDA 20 mg/day (N=71) LATUDA 40 mg/day (N=487) LATUDA 80 mg/day (N=538) LATUDA 120 mg/day (N=291) LATUDA 160 mg/day (N=121) Serum Creatinine Elevated 2% 1% 2% 2% 5% 7% Adolescents Serum Creatinine: In the short-term, placebo-controlled, adolescent schizophrenia study, the mean change from Baseline in serum creatinine was –0.009 mg/dL for LATUDA-treated patients compared to +0.017 mg/dL for placebo-treated patients. A creatinine shift from normal to high (based on the centralized laboratory definition) occurred in 7.2% (14/194) of LATUDA-treated patients and 2.9% (3/103) on placebo (Table 30). Table 30: Serum Creatinine Shifts from Normal at Baseline to High at Study End-Point in the Adolescent Schizophrenia Study Laboratory Parameter Placebo (N=103) LATUDA 40 mg/day (N=97) LATUDA 80 mg/day (N=97) Serum Creatinine Elevated 2.9% 7.2% 7.2% Bipolar Depression Adults Monotherapy Serum Creatinine: In the adult short-term, flexible-dose, placebo-controlled monotherapy bipolar depression study, the mean change from Baseline in serum creatinine was +0.01 mg/dL for LATUDA-treated patients compared to -0.02 mg/dL for placebo-treated patients. A creatinine shift from normal to high occurred in 2.8% (9/322) of LATUDA-treated patients and 0.6% (1/162) on placebo (Table 31). Table 31: Serum Creatinine Shifts from Normal at Baseline to High at Study End-Point in the Adult Monotherapy Bipolar Depression Study Laboratory Parameter Placebo (N=168) LATUDA 20 to 60 mg/day (N=164) LATUDA 80 to 120 mg/day (N=167) Serum Creatinine Elevated <1% 2% 4% Adjunctive Therapy with Lithium or Valproate Serum Creatinine: In adult short-term, placebo-controlled premarketing adjunctive studies for bipolar depression, the mean change from Baseline in serum creatinine was +0.04 mg/dL for LATUDA-treated patients compared to -0.01 mg/dL for placebo-treated patients. A creatinine shift from normal to high occurred in 4.3% (15/360) of LATUDA-treated patients and 1.6% (5/334) on pl

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION LATUDA should be taken with food (at least 350 calories). Administration with food substantially increases the absorption of LATUDA (2.3, 12.3). Indication Starting Dose Recommended Dose Schizophrenia – adults (2.1) 40 mg per day 40 mg to 160 mg per day Schizophrenia –adolescents (13 to 17 years) (2.1) 40 mg per day 40 mg to 80 mg per day Bipolar Depression - adults (2.2) 20 mg per day 20 mg to 120 mg per day Bipolar Depression –pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) (2.2) 20 mg per day 20 mg to 80 mg per day Moderate and Severe Renal Impairment: Recommended starting dose is 20 mg per day, and the maximum recommended dose is 80 mg per day (2.4, 8.6). Moderate and Severe Hepatic Impairment: Recommended starting dose is 20 mg per day. The maximum recommended dose is 80 mg per day in moderate hepatic impairment and 40 mg per day in severe hepatic impairment (2.5, 8.7). Concomitant Use of a Moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor (e.g., diltiazem): LATUDA dose should be reduced to half of the original dose level. Recommended starting dose is 20 mg per day. Maximum recommended dose is 80 mg per day (2.6, 7.1). Concomitant Use of a Moderate CYP3A4 Inducer: It may be necessary to increase the dose of LATUDA (2.6, 7.1). 2.1 Schizophrenia Adults The recommended starting dose of LATUDA is 40 mg once daily. Initial dose titration is not required. LATUDA has been shown to be effective in a dose range of 40 mg per day to 160 mg per day [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The maximum recommended dose is 160 mg per day. Adolescents (13 – 17 years) The recommended starting dose of LATUDA is 40 mg once daily. Initial dose titration is not required. LATUDA has been shown to be effective in a dose range of 40 mg per day to 80 mg per day [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The maximum recommended dose is 80 mg per day. 2.2 Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar I Disorder Adults The recommended starting dose of LATUDA is 20 mg given once daily as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate. Initial dose titration is not required. LATUDA has been shown to be effective in a dose range of 20 mg per day to 120 mg per day as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The maximum recommended dose, as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate, is 120 mg per day. In the monotherapy study, the higher dose range (80 mg to 120 mg per day) did not provide additional efficacy, on average, compared to the lower dose range (20 to 60 mg per day) [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. Pediatric Patients (10 – 17 years) The recommended starting dose of LATUDA is 20 mg given once daily as monotherapy. Initial dose titration is not required. The dose may be increased after one week based on clinical response. LATUDA has been shown to be effective in a dose range of 20 mg per day to 80 mg per day as monotherapy. At the end of the clinical study, most of the patients (67%) received 20 mg or 40 mg once daily [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The maximum recommended dose is 80 mg per day. The efficacy of LATUDA in the treatment of mania associated with bipolar disorder has not been established. 2.3 Administration Information LATUDA should be taken with food (at least 350 calories). Administration with food substantially increases the absorption of LATUDA. Administration with food increases the AUC approximately 2-fold and increases the Cmax approximately 3-fold. In the clinical studies, LATUDA was administered with food [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. The effectiveness of LATUDA for longer-term use, that is, for more than 6 weeks, has not been established in controlled studies. Therefore, the physician who elects to use LATUDA for extended periods should periodically re-evaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient [see Dosage and Administration (2.1 and 2.2)]. 2.4 Dose Modifications for Renal Impairment Dose adjustment is recommended in moderate (creatinine clearance: 30 to <50 mL/min) and severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min) patients. The recommended starting dose is 20 mg per day. The dose in these patients should not exceed 80 mg per day [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6)]. 2.5 Dose Modifications for Hepatic Impairment Dose adjustment is recommended in moderate (Child-Pugh Score = 7 to 9) and severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Score = 10 to 15) patients. The recommended starting dose is 20 mg per day. The dose in moderate hepatic impairment patients should not exceed 80 mg per day and the dose in severe hepatic impairment patients should not exceed 40 per mg/day [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7)]. 2.6 Dose Modifications Due to Drug Interactions of CYP3A4 Inhibitors and CYP3A4 Inducers Concomitant Use with CYP3A4 Inhibitors LATUDA should not be used concomitantly with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor (e.g., ketoconazole, clarithromycin, ritonavir, voriconazole, mibefradil, etc.) [see Contraindications (4)]. If LATUDA is being prescribed and a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor (e.g. diltiazem, atazanavir, erythromycin, fluconazole, verapamil etc.) is added to the therapy, the LATUDA dose should be reduced to half of the original dose level. Similarly, if a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor is being prescribed and LATUDA is added to the therapy, the recommended starting dose of LATUDA is 20 mg per day, and the maximum recommended dose of LATUDA is 80 mg per day [see Contraindications (4), Drug Interactions (7.1)]. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice should be avoided in patients taking LATUDA, since these may inhibit CYP3A4 and alter LATUDA concentrations [see Drug Interactions (7.1)]. Concomitant Use with CYP3A4 Inducers LATUDA should not be used concomitantly with a strong CYP3A4 inducer (e.g., rifampin, avasimibe, St. John's wort, phenytoin, carbamazepine, etc.) [see Contraindications (4); Drug Interactions (7.1)]. If LATUDA is used concomitantly with a moderate CYP3A4 inducer, it may be necessary to increase the LATUDA dose after chronic treatment (7 days or more) with the CYP3A4 inducer.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnancy: May cause extrapyramidal and or/withdrawal symptoms in neonates with third trimester exposure (8.1). 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Exposure Registry There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to LATUDA during pregnancy. For more information, contact the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics at 1-866-961-2388 or visit http://womensmentalhealth.org/clinical-and-research-programs/pregnancyregistry/. Risk Summary Neonates exposed to antipsychotic drugs during the third trimester of pregnancy are at risk for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms following delivery [see Clinical Considerations]. There are no studies of LATUDA use in pregnant women. The limited available data are not sufficient to inform a drug-associated risk of birth defects or miscarriage. In animal reproduction studies, no teratogenic effects were seen in pregnant rats and rabbits given lurasidone during the period of organogenesis at doses approximately 1.5- and 6-times, the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 160 mg/day, respectively based on mg/m2 body surface area [see Data]. The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population(s) is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reactions Extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms, including agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress and feeding disorder have been reported in neonates who were exposed to antipsychotic drugs during the third trimester of pregnancy. These symptoms have varied in severity. Some neonates recovered within hours or days without specific treatment; others required prolonged hospitalization. Monitor neonates for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms and manage symptoms appropriately. Data Animal Data Pregnant rats were treated with oral lurasidone at doses of 3, 10, and 25 mg/kg/day during the period of organogenesis. These doses are 0.2, 0.6, and 1.5 times the MRHD of 160 mg/day based on mg/m2 body surface area. No teratogenic or embryo-fetal effects were observed up to 1.5 times the MRHD of 160 mg/day, based on mg/m2 . Pregnant rabbits were treated with oral lurasidone at doses of 2, 10, and 50 mg/kg/day during the period of organogenesis. These doses are 0.2, 1.2 and 6 times the MRHD of 160 mg/day based on mg/m2. No teratogenic or embryo-fetal effects were observed up to 6 times the MRHD of 160 mg/day based on mg/m2. Pregnant rats were treated with oral lurasidone at doses of 0.4, 2, and 10 mg/kg/day during the periods of organogenesis and lactation. These doses are 0.02, 0.1 and 0.6 times the MRHD of 160 mg/day based on mg/m2. No pre- and postnatal developmental effects were observed up to 0.6 times the MRHD of 160 mg/day, based on mg/m2. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary Lactation studies have not been conducted to assess the presence of lurasidone in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Lurasidone is present in rat milk. The development and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for LATUDA and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from LATUDA or from the underlying maternal condition. 8.4 Pediatric Use Schizophrenia The safety and effectiveness of LATUDA 40-mg/day and 80-mg/day for the treatment of schizophrenia in adolescents (13 to 17 years) was established in a 6-week, placebo-controlled clinical study in 326 adolescent patients [see Dosage and Administration (2.1), Adverse Reactions (6.1), and Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The safety and effectiveness of LATUDA has not been established in pediatric patients less than 13 years of age with schizophrenia. Bipolar Depression The safety and effectiveness of LATUDA 20 to 80 mg/day for the treatment of bipolar depression in pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) was established in a 6-week, placebo-controlled clinical study in 347 pediatric patients [see Dosage and Administration (2.2), Adverse Reactions (6.1), and Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The safety and effectiveness of LATUDA has not been established in pediatric patients less than 10 years of age with bipolar depression. Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder The effectiveness of LATUDA in pediatric patients for the treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder has not been established. Efficacy was not demonstrated in a 6-week study evaluating LATUDA 20 mg/day and 60 mg/day for the treatment of pediatric patients 6 to 17 years of age with irritability associated with autistic disorder diagnosed by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder s, 4th Ed., Text Revision [DSM-IV-TR] criteria. The primary objective of the study as measured by improvement from Baseline in the irritability subscale of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) at Endpoint (Week 6) was not met. A total of 149 patients were randomized to LATUDA or placebo. Vomiting occurred at a higher rate than reported in other LATUDA studies (4/49 or 8% for 20mg, 14/51 or 27% for 60mg, and 2/49 or 4% for placebo), particularly in children ages 6 to 12 (13 out of 18 patients on LATUDA with vomiting). Juvenile animal studies Adverse effects were seen on growth, physical and neurobehavioral development at doses as low as 0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m2. Lurasidone was orally administered to rats from postnatal days 21 through 91 (this period corresponds to childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood in humans) at doses of 3, 30, and 150 (males) or 300 (females) mg/kg/day which are 0.2 to 10 times (males) and 20 times (females) the maximum recommended adult human dose (MRHD) of 160 mg/day based on mg/m2. The adverse effects included dose-dependent decreases in femoral length, bone mineral content, body and brain weights at 2 times the MRHD in both sexes, and motor hyperactivity at 0.2 and 2 times the MRHD in both sexes based on mg/m2. In females, there was a delay in attainment of sexual maturity at 2 times the MRHD, associated with decreased serum estradiol. Mortality occurred in both sexes during early post-weaning period and some of the male weanlings died after only 4 treatments at doses as low as 2 times the MRHD based on mg/m2. Histopathological findings included increased colloid in the thyroids and inflammation of the prostate in males at 10 times MRHD based on mg/m2 and mammary gland hyperplasia, increased vaginal mucification, and increased ovarian atretic follicles at doses as low as 0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m2. Some of these findings were attributed to transiently elevated serum prolactin which was seen in both sexes at all doses. However, there were no changes at any dose level in reproductive parameters (fertility, conception indices, spermatogenesis, estrous cycle, gestation length, parturition, number of pups born). The no effect dose for neurobehavioral changes in males is 0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m2 and could not be determined in females. The no effect dose for growth and physical development in both sexes is 0.2 times the MRHD based on mg/m2. 8.5 Geriatric Use Clinical studies with LATUDA did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 and older to determine whether or not they respond differently from younger patients. In elderly patients with psychosis (65 to 85), LATUDA concentrations (20 mg/day) were similar to those in young subjects. It is unknown whether dose adjustment is necessary on the basis of age alone. Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with LATUDA are at an increased risk of death compared to placebo. LATUDA is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.3)]. 8.6 Renal Impairment Reduce the maximum recommended dosage in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment (CLcr<50 mL/minute). Patients with impaired renal function (CLcr<50 mL/minute) had higher exposure to lurasidone than patients with normal renal function [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Greater exposure may increase the risk of LATUDA-associated adverse reactions [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)] 8.7 Hepatic Impairment Reduce the maximum recommended dosage in patients with moderate to severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score ≥7). Patients with moderate to severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score ≥7) generally had higher exposure to lurasidone than patients with normal hepatic function [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Greater exposure may increase the risk of LATUDA-associated adverse reactions [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)]. 8.8 Other Specific Populations No dosage adjustment for LATUDA is required on the basis of a patient's sex, race, or smoking status [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS 7.1 Drugs Having Clinically Important Interactions with LATUDA Table 34: Clinically Important Drug Interactions with LATUDA Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors Clinical Impact: Concomitant use of LATUDA with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors increased the exposure of lurasidone compared to the use of LATUDA alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention: LATUDA should not be used concomitantly with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors [see Contraindications (4)]. Examples: Ketoconazole, clarithromycin, ritonavir, voriconazole, mibefradil Moderate CYP3A4 Inhibitors Clinical Impact: Concomitant use of LATUDA with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors increased the exposure of lurasidone compared to the use of LATUDA alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention: LATUDA dose should be reduced to half of the original level when used concomitantly with moderate inhibitors of CYP3A4 [see Dosage and Administration (2.6)]. Examples: Diltiazem, atazanavir, erythromycin, fluconazole, verapamil Strong CYP3A4 Inducers Clinical Impact: Concomitant use of LATUDA with strong CYP3A4 inducers decreased the exposure of lurasidone compared to the use of LATUDA alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention: LATUDA should not be used concomitantly with strong CYP3A4 inducers [see Contraindications (4)]. Examples: Rifampin, avasimibe, St. John's wort, phenytoin, carbamazepine Moderate CYP3A4 Inducers Clinical Impact: Concomitant use of LATUDA with moderate CYP3A4 inducers decreased the exposure of lurasidone compared to the use of LATUDA alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention: LATUDA dose should be increased when used concomitantly with moderate inducers of CYP3A4 [see Dosage and Administration (2.6)]. Examples: Bosentan, efavirenz, etravirine, modafinil, nafcillin 7.2 Drugs Having No Clinically Important Interactions with LATUDA Based on pharmacokinetic studies, no dosage adjustment of LATUDA is required when administered concomitantly with lithium, valproate, or substrates of P-gp or CYP3A4 [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA200603
Agency product number O0P4I5851I
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 63402-304,63402-312,63402-306,63402-308,63402-302
Date Last Revised 16-03-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 1040031
Storage and handling Storage Store LATUDA tablets at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15° - 30°C (59° - 86°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature].
Marketing authorisation holder Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Warnings WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS; and SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. LATUDA is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 )]. Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in pediatric and young adults in short-term studies. Closely monitor all antidepressant-treated patients for clinical worsening, and for emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS; and SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. LATUDA is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis (5.1). Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in pediatric and young adult patients. Closely monitor for clinical worsening and emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. (5.2).