Data from FDA - Curated by Toby Galbraith - Last updated 11 October 2017

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE GENVOYA is indicated as a complete regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults and pediatric patients weighing at least 25 kg who have no antiretroviral treatment history or to replace the current antiretroviral regimen in those who are virologically-suppressed (HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL) on a stable antiretroviral regimen for at least 6 months with no history of treatment failure and no known substitutions associated with resistance to the individual components of GENVOYA [see Clinical Studies (14)]. GENVOYA is a four-drug combination of elvitegravir, an HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI), cobicistat, a CYP3A inhibitor, and emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), both HIV-1 nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), and is indicated as a complete regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults and pediatric patients weighing at least 25 kg who have no antiretroviral treatment history or to replace the current antiretroviral regimen in those who are virologically-suppressed (HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL) on a stable antiretroviral regimen for at least 6 months with no history of treatment failure and no known substitutions associated with resistance to the individual components of GENVOYA. (1)

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Coadministration of GENVOYA is contraindicated with drugs that are highly dependent on CYP3A for clearance and for which elevated plasma concentrations are associated with serious and/or life-threatening events. These drugs and other contraindicated drugs (which may lead to reduced efficacy of GENVOYA and possible resistance) are listed in Table 1 [see Drug Interactions (7.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Table 1 Drugs that are Contraindicated with GENVOYA Drug Class Drugs within Class that are Contraindicated with GENVOYA Clinical Comment Alpha 1-Adrenoreceptor Antagonist Alfuzosin Potential for increased alfuzosin concentrations, which can result in hypotension. Anticonvulsants CarbamazepineIndicates that a drug-drug interaction trial was conducted. Phenobarbital Phenytoin Carbamazepine, phenobarbital, and phenytoin are potent inducers of CYP450 metabolism and may cause significant decrease in the plasma concentration of elvitegravir, cobicistat, and TAF. This may result in loss of therapeutic effect to GENVOYA. Antimycobacterial Rifampin Rifampin is a potent inducer of CYP450 metabolism and may cause significant decrease in the plasma concentration of elvitegravir, cobicistat, and TAF. This may result in loss of therapeutic effect to GENVOYA. Antipsychotics Lurasidone Potential for serious and/or life-threatening reactions. Pimozide Potential for serious and/or life-threatening reactions such as cardiac arrhythmias. Ergot Derivatives Dihydroergotamine Ergotamine Methylergonovine Potential for serious and/or life-threatening events such as acute ergot toxicity characterized by peripheral vasospasm and ischemia of the extremities and other tissues. GI Motility Agent Cisapride Potential for serious and/or life-threatening events such as cardiac arrhythmias. Herbal Products St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) Coadministration of products containing St. John's wort and GENVOYA may result in reduced plasma concentrations of elvitegravir, cobicistat, and TAF. This may result in loss of therapeutic effect and development of resistance. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors Lovastatin Simvastatin Potential for serious reactions such as myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) Inhibitor SildenafilSee Drug Interactions (7), Table 6 for sildenafil when used for erectile dysfunction. when dosed as REVATIO for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension There is increased potential for sildenafil-associated adverse events (which include visual disturbances, hypotension, priapism, and syncope). Sedative/hypnotics Triazolam Orally administered midazolamSee Drug Interactions (7), Table 6 for parenterally administered midazolam. Triazolam and orally administered midazolam are extensively metabolized by CYP3A4. Coadministration of triazolam or orally administered midazolam with GENVOYA may cause large increases in the concentration of these benzodiazepines. The potential exists for serious and/or life threatening events such as prolonged or increased sedation or respiratory depression. Coadministration of GENVOYA is contraindicated with drugs that: Are highly dependent on CYP3A for clearance and for which elevated plasma concentrations are associated with serious adverse events. (4) Strongly induce CYP3A, which may lead to lower exposure of one or more components and loss of efficacy of GENVOYA and possible resistance. (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following adverse drug reactions are discussed in other sections of the labeling: Severe Acute Exacerbations of Hepatitis B [see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Immune Reconstitution Syndrome [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] New Onset or Worsening Renal Impairment [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] Lactic Acidosis/Severe Hepatomegaly with Steatosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)] Most common adverse reaction (incidence greater than or equal to 10%, all grades) is nausea. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Gilead Sciences, Inc. at 1-800-GILEAD-5 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Clinical Trials in Treatment-Naïve Adults The primary safety assessment of GENVOYA was based on Week 144 pooled data from 1,733 subjects in two randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trials, Study 104 and Study 111, in antiretroviral treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected adult subjects. A total of 866 subjects received one tablet of GENVOYA once daily [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The most common adverse reaction (all Grades) reported in at least 10% of subjects in the GENVOYA group was nausea. The proportion of subjects who discontinued treatment with GENVOYA or STRIBILD® due to adverse events, regardless of severity, was 1% and 2%, respectively. Table 2 displays the frequency of adverse reactions (all Grades) greater than or equal to 5% in the GENVOYA group. Table 2 Adverse ReactionsFrequencies of adverse reactions are based on all adverse events attributed to study drugs by the investigator. (All Grades) Reported in ≥ 5% of HIV-1 Infected Treatment-Naïve Adults Receiving GENVOYA in Studies 104 and 111 (Week 144 analysis) GENVOYA N=866 STRIBILD N=867 Nausea 11% 13% Diarrhea 7% 9% Headache 6% 5% Fatigue 5% 4% The majority of events presented in Table 2 occurred at severity Grade 1. Clinical Trials in Virologically Suppressed Adults The safety of GENVOYA in virologically-suppressed adults was based on Week 96 data from 959 subjects in a randomized, open-label, active-controlled trial (Study 109) in which virologically-suppressed subjects were switched from a TDF-containing combination regimen to GENVOYA. Overall, the safety profile of GENVOYA in subjects in this study was similar to that of treatment-naïve subjects [see Clinical Studies (14.3)]. Additional adverse reactions observed with GENVOYA in Study 109 included suicidal ideation, suicidal behavior, and suicide attempt (<1% combined); all of these events were serious and all occurred in subjects with a preexisting history of depression or psychiatric illness. Clinical Trials in Adult Subjects with Renal Impairment In an open-label trial (Study 112), 248 HIV-1 infected subjects with eGFR of 30 to 69 mL per minute (by Cockcroft-Gault method) were treated with GENVOYA for a median duration of 108 weeks. Of these subjects, 65% had previously been on a stable TDF-containing regimen. A total of 5 subjects permanently discontinued GENVOYA due to the development of renal adverse events. Three of these five were among the 80 subjects with baseline eGFRs of < 50mL/min and two subjects were among the 162 subjects with baseline eGFRs of ≥ 50mL/min. One additional subject with baseline eGFR of ≥ 50mL/min developed acute renal failure. Following a brief interruption, GENVOYA was resumed and this subject's renal function returned to baseline. Overall, renally impaired subjects receiving GENVOYA in this study had a mean serum creatinine of 1.5 mg/dL at baseline and 1.4 mg/dL at Week 96. Otherwise, the safety profile of GENVOYA in subjects in this study was similar to that of subjects with normal renal function [see Clinical Studies (14.4)]. Renal Laboratory Tests and Renal Safety Treatment-Naïve Adults: Cobicistat (a component of GENVOYA) has been shown to increase serum creatinine due to inhibition of tubular secretion of creatinine without affecting glomerular filtration [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)]. Increases in serum creatinine occurred by Week 2 of treatment and remained stable through 144 weeks. In two 144-week randomized, controlled trials in a total of 1,733 treatment-naïve adults with a median baseline eGFR of 115 mL per minute, mean serum creatinine increased by less than 0.1 mg per dL in the GENVOYA group and by 0.1 mg per dL in the STRIBILD group from baseline to Week 144. Virologically Suppressed Adults: In a study of 1,436 virologically-suppressed TDF-treated adults with a mean baseline eGFR of 112 mL per minute who were randomized to continue their treatment regimen or switch to GENVOYA, at Week 96 mean serum creatinine was similar to baseline for both those continuing baseline treatment and those switching to GENVOYA. Bone Mineral Density Effects Treatment-Naïve Adults: In a pooled analysis of Studies 104 and 111, the effects of GENVOYA compared to STRIBILD on bone mineral density (BMD) change from baseline to Week 144 were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The mean percentage change in BMD from baseline to Week 144 was −0.92% with GENVOYA compared to −2.95% with STRIBILD at the lumbar spine and −0.75% compared to −3.36% at the total hip. BMD declines of 5% or greater at the lumbar spine were experienced by 15% of GENVOYA subjects and 29% of STRIBILD subjects. BMD declines of 7% or greater at the femoral neck were experienced by 15% of GENVOYA subjects and 29% of STRIBILD subjects. The long-term clinical significance of these BMD changes is not known. Virologically Suppressed Adults: In Study 109, TDF-treated subjects were randomized to continue their TDF-based regimen or switch to GENVOYA; changes in BMD from baseline to Week 96 were assessed by DXA. Mean BMD increased in subjects who switched to GENVOYA (2.12% lumbar spine, 2.44% total hip) and decreased slightly in subjects who continued their baseline regimen (−0.09% lumbar spine, −0.46% total hip). BMD declines of 5% or greater at the lumbar spine were experienced by 2% of GENVOYA subjects and 6% of subjects who continued their TDF-based regimen. BMD declines of 7% or greater at the femoral neck were experienced by 2% of GENVOYA subjects and 7% of subjects who continued their TDF-based regimen. The long-term clinical significance of these BMD changes is not known. Laboratory Abnormalities: The frequency of laboratory abnormalities (Grades 3–4) occurring in at least 2% of subjects receiving GENVOYA in Studies 104 and 111 are presented in Table 3. Table 3 Laboratory Abnormalities (Grades 3–4) Reported in ≥ 2% of Subjects Receiving GENVOYA in Studies 104 and 111 (Week 144 analysis) Laboratory Parameter AbnormalityFrequencies are based on treatment-emergent laboratory abnormalities. GENVOYA N=866 STRIBILD N=867 Creatine Kinase (≥10.0 × ULN) 11% 10% LDL-cholesterol (fasted) (>190 mg/dL) 11% 5% Total cholesterol (fasted) (>300mg/dL) 4% 3% Amylase 3% 5% ALT 3% 3% AST 3% 4% Urine RBC (Hematuria) (>75 RBC/HPF) 3% 3% Serum Lipids: Subjects receiving GENVOYA experienced greater increases in serum lipids compared to those receiving STRIBILD. Changes from baseline in total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol to HDL ratio are presented in Table 4. Table 4 Lipid Values, Mean Change from Baseline, Reported in Subjects Receiving GENVOYA or STRIBILD in Studies 104 and 111Excludes subjects who received lipid lowering agents during the treatment period. GENVOYA N=866 STRIBILD N=867 Baseline Week 144 Baseline Week 144 mg/dL ChangeThe change from baseline is the mean of within-subject changes from baseline for subjects with both baseline and Week 144 values. mg/dL Change Total Cholesterol (fasted) 162 [N=647] +31 [N=647] 165 [N=627] +14 [N=627] Triglycerides (fasted) 111 [N=647] +31 [N=647] 115 [N=627] +17 [N=627] LDL-cholesterol (fasted) 103 [N=647] +18 [N=643] 107 [N=628] +8 [N=628] HDL-cholesterol (fasted) 47 [N=647] +7 [N=647] 46 [N=627] +3 [N=627] Total Cholesterol to HDL ratio 3.7 [N=647] 0.2 [N=647] 3.8 [N=627] 0.1 [N=627] Clinical Trials in Pediatric Subjects: Safety in Pediatric Patients The safety of GENVOYA in HIV-1 infected pediatric subjects was evaluated in treatment-naïve subjects between the ages of 12 to less than 18 years and weighing at least 35 kg (N=50) through Week 48 (cohort 1), and in virologically-suppressed subjects between the ages of 6 to less than 12 years and weighing at least 25 kg (N=23) through Week 24 (cohort 2) in an open-label clinical trial (Study 106) [see Clinical Studies (14.5)]. With the exception of a decrease in the mean CD4+ cell count observed in cohort 2 of Study 106, the safety profile in pediatric subjects who received treatment with GENVOYA was similar to that in adults. One 13-year-old female subject developed unexplained uveitis while receiving GENVOYA that resolved and did not require discontinuation of GENVOYA. Bone Mineral Density Effects Cohort 1: Treatment-naïve adolescents (12 to less than 18 years; at least 35 kg) Among the subjects in cohort 1 receiving GENVOYA, mean BMD increased from baseline to Week 48, + 4.2% at the lumbar spine and + 1.3% for the total body less head (TBLH). Mean changes from baseline BMD Z-scores were −0.07 for lumbar spine and −0.20 for TBLH at Week 48. One GENVOYA subject had significant (at least 4%) lumbar spine BMD loss at Week 48. Cohort 2: Virologically-suppressed children (6 to less than 12 years; at least 25 kg) Among the subjects in cohort 2 receiving GENVOYA, mean BMD increased from baseline to Week 24, +2.9% at the lumbar spine and +1.7% for TBLH. Mean changes from baseline BMD Z-scores were -0.06 for lumbar spine and -0.18 for TBLH at Week 24. Two GENVOYA subjects had significant (at least 4%) lumbar spine BMD loss at Week 24. Change from Baseline in CD4+ cell counts Cohort 2: Virologically-suppressed children (6 to less than 12 years; at least 25 kg) Cohort 2 of Study 106 evaluated pediatric subjects (N=23) who were virologically-suppressed and who switched from their antiretroviral regimen to GENVOYA. Although all subjects had HIV-1 RNA < 50 copies/mL, there was a decrease from baseline in CD4+ cell count at Week 24. The mean baseline and mean change from baseline in CD4+ cell count and in CD4% from Week 2 to Week 24 are presented in Table 5. All subjects maintained their CD4+ cell counts above 400 cells/mm3 [see Pediatric Use (8.4) and Clinical Studies (14.5)]. Table 5 Mean Change in CD4+ Count and Percentage from Baseline to Week 24 in Virologically-Suppressed Pediatric Patients from 6 to <12 Years Who Switched to GENVOYA Baseline Mean Change from Baseline Week 2 Week 4 Week 12 Week 24 CD4+ Cell Count (cells/mm3) 966 (201.7)Mean (SD) -162 -125 -162 -150 CD4% 40 (5.3) +0.5% -0.1% -0.8% -1.5%

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Testing: Prior to initiation of GENVOYA, patients should be tested for hepatitis B virus infection. Assess serum creatinine, serum phosphorus, estimated creatinine clearance, urine glucose, and urine protein before initiating GENVOYA and during therapy in all patients as clinically appropriate. (2.1) Recommended dosage: One tablet taken orally once daily with food in patients with body weight at least 25 kg and a creatinine clearance greater than or equal to 30 mL per minute. (2.2) Renal impairment: GENVOYA is not recommended in patients with estimated creatinine clearance below 30 mL per minute. (2.3) Hepatic impairment: GENVOYA is not recommended in patients with severe hepatic impairment. (2.4) 2.1 Testing Prior to Initiation and During Treatment with GENVOYA Prior to initiation of GENVOYA, patients should be tested for hepatitis B virus infection [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. It is recommended that serum creatinine, serum phosphorus, estimated creatinine clearance, urine glucose and urine protein be assessed before initiating GENVOYA and during therapy in all patients as clinically appropriate [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]. 2.2 Recommended Dosage GENVOYA is a four-drug fixed dose combination product containing 150 mg of elvitegravir, 150 mg of cobicistat, 200 mg of emtricitabine, and 10 mg of tenofovir alafenamide (TAF). The recommended dosage of GENVOYA is one tablet taken orally once daily with food in adults and pediatric patients with body weight at least 25 kg and creatinine clearance greater than or equal to 30 mL per minute [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 2.3 Not Recommended in Patients with Severe Renal Impairment GENVOYA is not recommended in patients with estimated creatinine clearance below 30 mL per minute [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6)]. 2.4 Not Recommended in Patients with Severe Hepatic Impairment GENVOYA is not recommended in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C) [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Lactation: Women infected with HIV should be instructed not to breastfeed due to the potential for HIV transmission. (8.2) Pediatrics: Not recommended for patients weighing less than 25 kg. (8.4) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Exposure Registry There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to GENVOYA during pregnancy. Healthcare providers are encouraged to register patients by calling the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry (APR) at 1-800-258-4263. Risk Summary Prospective pregnancy data from the APR are not sufficient to adequately assess the risk of birth defects of miscarriage. TAF use in women during pregnancy has not been evaluated; however, elvitegravir, cobicistat, and emtricitabine use during pregnancy has been evaluated in a limited number of women as reported to the APR. Available data from the APR through January 2016 show no birth defects reported for elvitegravir or cobicistat, and no difference in the overall risk of major birth defects for emtricitabine compared with the background rate for major birth defects of 2.7% in a U.S. reference population of the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) [see Data]. In animal studies, no adverse developmental effects were observed when the components of GENVOYA were administered separately during the period of organogenesis at exposures up to 23 and 0.2 times (rat and rabbits, respectively: elvitegravir), 1.6 and 3.8 times (rats and rabbits, respectively: cobicistat), 60 and 108 times (mice and rabbits, respectively; emtricitabine) and equal to and 53 times (rats and rabbits, respectively; TAF) the exposure at the recommended daily dosage of these components in GENVOYA [see Data]. Likewise, no adverse developmental effects were seen when elvitegravir or cobicistat was administered to rats through lactation at exposures up to 18 times or 1.2 times, respectively, the human exposure at the recommended therapeutic dose, and when emtricitabine was administered to mice through lactation at exposures up to approximately 60 times the exposure at the recommended daily dose. No adverse effects were observed in the offspring when TDF was administered through lactation at tenofovir exposures of approximately 14 times the exposure at the recommended daily dosage of GENVOYA. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The rate of miscarriage is not reported in the APR. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2–4% and 15–20%, respectively. Data Human Data Elvitegravir: Based on prospective reports from the APR through January 2016 of 73 exposures to elvitegravir-containing regimens during pregnancy resulting in live births (including 51 exposed in the first trimester), there have been no birth defects reported. Cobicistat: Based on prospective reports from the APR through January 2016 of 77 exposures to cobicistat-containing regimens during pregnancy resulting in live births (including 54 exposed in the first trimester), there have been no birth defects reported. Emtricitabine: Based on prospective reports to the APR through January 2016 of 3,155 exposures to emtricitabine-containing regimens during pregnancy resulting in live births (including 2,145 exposed in the first trimester and 1,010 exposed in the second/third trimester), there was no difference between FTC and overall birth defects compared with the background birth defect rate of 2.7% in the U.S. reference population of the MACDP. The prevalence of birth defects in live births was 2.2% (95% CI: 1.6% to 3.0%) with first trimester exposure to FTC-containing regimens and 2.1% (95% CI: 1.3% to 3.2%) with the second/third trimester exposure to emtricitabine-containing regimens. Animal Data Elvitegravir: Elvitegravir was administered orally to pregnant rats (0, 300, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg/day) and rabbits (0, 50, 150, and 450 mg/kg/day) through organogenesis (on gestation days 7 through 17 and days 7 through 19, respectively). No significant toxicological effects were observed in embryo-fetal toxicity studies performed with elvitegravir in rats at exposures (AUC) approximately 23 times and in rabbits at approximately 0.2 times the human exposures at the recommended daily dose. In a pre/postnatal developmental study, elvitegravir was administered orally to rats at doses of 0, 300, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg from gestation day 7 to day 20 of lactation. At doses of 2000 mg/kg/day of elvitegravir, neither maternal nor developmental toxicity was noted. Systemic exposures (AUC) at this dose were 18 times the human exposures at the recommended daily dose. Cobicistat: Cobicistat was administered orally to pregnant rats at doses of 0, 25, 50, 125 mg/kg/day on gestation day 6 to 17. Increases in post-implantation loss and decreased fetal weights were observed at a maternal toxic dose of 125 mg/kg/day. No malformations were noted at doses up to 125 mg/kg/day. Systemic exposures (AUC) at 50 mg/kg/day in pregnant females were 1.6 times higher than human exposures at the recommended daily dose. In pregnant rabbits, cobicistat was administered orally at doses of 0, 20, 50, and 100 mg/kg/day during gestation days 7 to 20. No maternal or embryo/fetal effects were noted at the highest dose of 100 mg/kg/day. Systemic exposures (AUC) at 100 mg/kg/day were 3.8 times higher than human exposures at the recommended daily dose. In a pre/postnatal developmental study in rats, cobicistat was administered orally at doses of 0, 10, 30, and 75 mg/kg from gestation day 6 to postnatal day 20, 21, or 22. At doses of 75 mg/kg/day of cobicistat, neither maternal nor developmental toxicity was noted. Systemic exposures (AUC) at this dose were 1.2 times the human exposures at the recommended daily dose. Emtricitabine: Emtricitabine was administered orally to pregnant mice (250, 500, or 1000 mg/kg/day) and rabbits (100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day) through organogenesis (on gestation days 6 through 15, and 7 through 19, respectively). No significant toxicological effects were observed in embryo-fetal toxicity studies performed with emtricitabine in mice at exposures (AUC) approximately 60 times higher and in rabbits at approximately 108 times higher than human exposures at the recommended daily dose. In a pre/postnatal development study with emtricitabine, mice were administered doses up to 1000 mg/kg/day; no significant adverse effects directly related to drug were observed in the offspring exposed daily from before birth (in utero) through sexual maturity at daily exposures (AUC) of approximately 60 times higher than human exposures at the recommended daily dose. Tenofovir Alafenamide (TAF): TAF was administered orally to pregnant rats (25, 100, or 250 mg/kg/day) and rabbits (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg/day) through organogenesis (on gestation days 6 through 17, and 7 through 20, respectively). No adverse embryo-fetal effects were observed in rats and rabbits at TAF exposures similar to (rats) and approximately 53 (rabbits) times higher than the exposure in humans at the recommended daily dose of GENVOYA. TAF is rapidly converted to tenofovir; the observed tenofovir exposure in rats and rabbits were 59 (rats) and 93 (rabbits) times higher than human tenofovir exposures at the recommended daily doses. Since TAF is rapidly converted to tenofovir and lower tenofovir exposures in rats and mice were observed after TAF administration compared to TDF administration, a pre/postnatal development study in rats was conducted only with TDF. Doses up to 600 mg/kg/day were administered through lactation; no adverse effects were observed in the offspring on gestation day 7 [and lactation day 20] at tenofovir exposures of approximately 14 [21] times higher than the exposures in humans at the recommended daily dose of GENVOYA. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that HIV-infected mothers not breastfeed their infants to avoid risking postnatal transmission of HIV. Based on published data, emtricitabine has been shown to be present in human breast milk; it is unknown if elvitegravir, cobicistat, and TAF are present in human breast milk. Elvitegravir and cobicistat are present in rat milk, and tenofovir has been shown to be present in the milk of lactating rats and rhesus monkeys after administration of TDF [see Data]. It is unknown if TAF is present in animal milk. It is not known if GENVOYA affects milk production or has effects on the breastfed child. Because of the potential for 1) HIV transmission (in HIV-negative infants); 2) developing viral resistance (in HIV-positive infants); and 3) adverse reactions in a breastfed infant similar to those seen in adults, instruct mothers not to breastfeed if they are receiving GENVOYA. Data Animal Data Elvitegravir: During the pre/postnatal developmental toxicology study at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day, a mean elvitegravir milk to plasma ratio of 0.1 was measured 30 minutes after administration to rats on lactation day 14. Cobicistat: During the pre/postnatal developmental toxicology study at doses up to 75 mg/kg/day, mean cobicistat milk to plasma ratio of up to 1.9 was measured 2 hours after administration to rats on lactation day 10. Tenofovir Alafenamide: Studies in rats and monkeys have demonstrated that tenofovir is secreted in milk. During the pre/postnatal developmental toxicology study, tenofovir was excreted into the milk of lactating rats following oral administration of TDF (up to 600 mg/kg/day) at up to approximately 24% of the median plasma concentration in the highest dosed animals at lactation day 11. Tenofovir was excreted into the milk of lactating rhesus monkeys, following a single subcutaneous (30 mg/kg) dose of tenofovir, at concentrations up to approximately 4% of plasma concentration resulting in exposure (AUC) of approximately 20% of plasma exposure. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of GENVOYA for the treatment of HIV-1 infection was established in pediatric patients with body weight greater than or equal to 25 kg [see Indications and Usage (1) and Dosage and Administration (2.2)]. Use of GENVOYA in pediatric patients between the ages of 12 to less than 18 years and weighing at least 35 kg is supported by studies in adults and by a study in antiretroviral treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected pediatric subjects ages 12 to less than 18 years and weighing at least 35 kg (cohort 1 of Study 106, N=50). The safety and efficacy of GENVOYA in these pediatric subjects was similar to that in adults [see Adverse Reactions (6.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), and Clinical Studies (14.5)]. Use of GENVOYA in pediatric patients weighing at least 25 kg is supported by studies in adults and by an open-label trial in virologically-suppressed pediatric subjects ages 6 to less than 12 years and weighing at least 25 kg, in which subjects were switched from their antiretroviral regimen to GENVOYA (cohort 2 of Study 106, N=23). The safety in these subjects through 24 weeks was similar to that in antiretroviral treatment-naïve adults with the exception of a decrease in mean change from baseline in CD4+ cell count [see Adverse Reactions (6.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), and Clinical Studies (14.5)]. Safety and effectiveness of GENVOYA in pediatric patients less than 25 kg have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Clinical trials of GENVOYA included 97 subjects (80 receiving GENVOYA) aged 65 years and over. No differences in safety or efficacy have been observed between elderly subjects and adults between 18 and less than 65 years of age. 8.6 Renal Impairment The pharmacokinetics, safety, and virologic and immunologic responses of GENVOYA in HIV-1 infected adult subjects with renal impairment (eGFR of 30 to 69 mL per minute by Cockcroft-Gault method) were evaluated in 248 subjects in an open-label trial, Study 112 [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) and Clinical Studies (14.4)]. GENVOYA is not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated creatinine clearance below 30 mL per minute). No dosage adjustment of GENVOYA is recommended in patients with estimated creatinine clearance greater than or equal to 30 mL per minute. The safety of GENVOYA has not been established in patients with estimated creatinine clearance that declines below 30 mL per minute [see Dosage and Administration (2.3), Warnings and Precautions (5.4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment No dosage adjustment of GENVOYA is required in patients with mild (Child-Pugh Class A) or moderate (Child-Pugh Class B) hepatic impairment. GENVOYA has not been studied in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C). Therefore, GENVOYA is not recommended for use in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Dosage and Administration (2.4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS GENVOYA should not be administered with other antiretroviral medications for treatment of HIV-1 infection. (7.1) GENVOYA can alter the concentration of drugs metabolized by CYP3A or CYP2D6. Drugs that induce CYP3A can alter the concentrations of one or more components of GENVOYA. Consult the full prescribing information prior to and during treatment for potential drug-drug interactions. (4, 7.2, 7.3, 12.3) 7.1 Not Recommended with Other Antiretroviral Medications GENVOYA is a complete regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection; therefore, coadministration of GENVOYA with other antiretroviral medications for treatment of HIV-1 infection should be avoided. Complete information regarding potential drug-drug interactions with other antiretroviral medications is not provided [see Contraindications, Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.2 Potential for GENVOYA to Affect Other Drugs Cobicistat, a component of GENVOYA, is an inhibitor of CYP3A and CYP2D6 and an inhibitor of the following transporters: P-glycoprotein (P-gp), BCRP, OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. Thus, coadministration of GENVOYA with drugs that are primarily metabolized by CYP3A or CYP2D6, or are substrates of P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1 or OATP1B3 may result in increased plasma concentrations of such drugs (see Table 6). Elvitegravir is a modest inducer of CYP2C9 and may decrease the plasma concentrations of CYP2C9 substrates. TAF is not an inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, or UGT1A1. TAF is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A in vitro. TAF is not an inhibitor or inducer of CYP3A in vivo. 7.3 Potential for Other Drugs to Affect One or More Components of GENVOYA Elvitegravir and cobicistat, components of GENVOYA, are metabolized by CYP3A. Cobicistat is also metabolized, to a minor extent, by CYP2D6. Drugs that induce CYP3A activity are expected to increase the clearance of elvitegravir and cobicistat, resulting in decreased plasma concentration of cobicistat, elvitegravir, and TAF, which may lead to loss of therapeutic effect of GENVOYA and development of resistance (see Table 6). Coadministration of GENVOYA with other drugs that inhibit CYP3A may decrease the clearance and increase the plasma concentration of cobicistat (see Table 6). TAF, a component of GENVOYA, is a substrate of P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. Drugs that inhibit P-gp and/or BCRP, such as cobicistat, may increase the absorption of TAF (see Table 13). However, when TAF is administered as a component of GENVOYA, its availability is increased by cobicistat and a further increase of TAF concentrations is not expected upon coadministration of an additional P-gp and/or BCRP inhibitor. Drugs that induce P-gp activity are expected to decrease the absorption of TAF, resulting in decreased plasma concentration of TAF. 7.4 Drugs Affecting Renal Function Because emtricitabine and tenofovir are primarily excreted by the kidneys by a combination of glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion, coadministration of GENVOYA with drugs that reduce renal function or compete for active tubular secretion may increase concentrations of emtricitabine, tenofovir, and other renally eliminated drugs and this may increase the risk of adverse reactions. Some examples of drugs that are eliminated by active tubular secretion include, but are not limited to, acyclovir, cidofovir, ganciclovir, valacyclovir, valganciclovir, aminoglycosides (e.g., gentamicin), and high-dose or multiple NSAIDs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]. 7.5 Established and Other Potentially Significant Interactions Table 6 provides a listing of established or potentially clinically significant drug interactions. The drug interactions described are based on studies conducted with either GENVOYA, the components of GENVOYA (elvitegravir, cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide) as individual agents and/or in combination, or are predicted drug interactions that may occur with GENVOYA [for magnitude of interaction, see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. The table includes potentially significant interactions but is not all inclusive. Table 6 Established and Other Potentially SignificantThis table is not all inclusive. Drug Interactions: Alteration in Dose or Regimen May Be Recommended Based on Drug Interaction Studies or Predicted Interaction Concomitant Drug Class: Drug Name Effect on Concentration↑ = Increase, ↓ = Decrease, ↔ = No Effect Clinical Comment Acid Reducing Agents: antacidsIndicates that a drug-drug interaction trial was conducted. e.g., aluminum and magnesium hydroxide ↓ elvitegravir Separate GENVOYA and antacid administration by at least 2 hours. Antiarrhythmics: e.g., amiodarone bepridil digoxin disopyramide flecainide systemic lidocaine mexiletine propafenone quinidine ↑ antiarrhythmics ↑ digoxin Caution is warranted and therapeutic concentration monitoring, if available, is recommended for antiarrhythmics when coadministered with GENVOYA. Antibacterials: clarithromycin telithromycin ↑ clarithromycin ↑ telithromycin ↑ cobicistat Patients with CLcr greater than or equal to 60 mL/minute: No dosage adjustment of clarithromycin is required. Patients with CLcr between 50 mL/minute and 60 mL/minute: The dosage of clarithromycin should be reduced by 50%. Anticoagulants: warfarin Effect on warfarin unknown Monitor the international normalized ratio (INR) upon coadministration with GENVOYA. Anticonvulsants: ethosuximide oxcarbazepine ↑ ethosuximide ↓ elvitegravir ↓ cobicistat ↓ TAF For contraindicated anticonvulsants, [see Contraindications (4)] Alternative anticonvulsants should be considered when GENVOYA is administered with oxcarbazepine. Clinical monitoring is recommended upon coadministration of ethosuximide with GENVOYA. Antidepressants: Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) e.g., paroxetine Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs) e.g., amitriptyline desipramine imipramine nortriptyline bupropion trazodone ↑ SSRIs (except sertraline) ↑ TCAs ↑ trazodone Careful dosage titration of the antidepressant and monitoring for antidepressant response are recommended when coadministered with GENVOYA. Antifungals: itraconazole ketoconazole voriconazole ↑ elvitegravir ↑ cobicistat ↑ itraconazole ↑ ketoconazole ↑ voriconazole When administering with GENVOYA, the maximum daily dosage of ketoconazole or itraconazole should not exceed 200 mg per day. An assessment of benefit/risk ratio is recommended to justify use of voriconazole with GENVOYA. Anti-gout: colchicine ↑ colchicine GENVOYA is not recommended to be coadministered with colchicine to patients with renal or hepatic impairment. Treatment of gout-flares – coadministration of colchicine in patients receiving GENVOYA: 0.6 mg (1 tablet) × 1 dose, followed by 0.3 mg (half tablet) 1 hour later. Treatment course to be repeated no earlier than 3 days. Prophylaxis of gout-flares – coadministration of colchicine in patients receiving GENVOYA: If the original regimen was 0.6 mg twice a day, the regimen should be adjusted to 0.3 mg once a day. If the original regimen was 0.6 mg once a day, the regimen should be adjusted to 0.3 mg once every other day. Treatment of familial Mediterranean fever – coadministration of colchicine in patients receiving GENVOYA: Maximum daily dosage of 0.6 mg (may be given as 0.3 mg twice a day). Antimycobacterial: rifabutin rifapentine ↓ elvitegravir ↓ cobicistat ↓ TAF For contraindicated antimycobacterials, [see Contraindications (4)] Coadministration of GENVOYA with rifabutin or rifapentine is not recommended. Antipsychotics: e.g., perphenazine risperidone thioridazine quetiapine ↑ antipsychotic ↑ quetiapine For contraindicated antipsychotics, [see Contraindications (4)] A decrease in dose of the antipsychotics that are metabolized by CYP3A or CYP2D6 may be needed when co-administered with GENVOYA. Initiation of GENVOYA in patients taking quetiapine: Consider alternative antiretroviral therapy to avoid increases in quetiapine exposure. If coadministration is necessary, reduce the quetiapine dose to 1/6 of the current dose and monitor for quetiapine-associated adverse reactions. Refer to the quetiapine prescribing information for recommendations on adverse reaction monitoring. Initiation of quetiapine in patients taking GENVOYA: Refer to the quetiapine prescribing information for initial dosing and titration of quetiapine. Benzodiazepines: e.g., Parenterally administered midazolam clorazepate diazepam estazolam flurazepam lorazepam ↑ diazepam ↔ lorazepam ↑ midazolam Coadministration of GENVOYA with diazepam or parenterally administered midazolam should be done in a setting that ensures close clinical monitoring and appropriate medical management in case of respiratory depression and/or prolonged sedation. Dosage reduction for midazolam should be considered, especially if more than a single dose of midazolam is administered. Based on non-CYP-mediated elimination pathways for lorazepam, no effect on plasma concentrations is expected upon coadministration with GENVOYA. Beta-Blockers: e.g., metoprolol timolol ↑ beta-blockers Clinical monitoring is recommended and a dosage decrease of the beta blocker may be necessary when these agents are coadministered with GENVOYA. Calcium Channel Blockers: e.g., amlodipine diltiazem felodipine nicardipine nifedipine verapamil ↑ calcium channel blockers Caution is warranted and clinical monitoring is recommended upon coadministration of calcium channel blockers with GENVOYA. Systemic/Inhaled/Nasal/Ophthalmic Corticosteroids: e.g., betamethasone budesonide ciclesonide dexamethasone fluticasone methylprednisolone mometasone prednisone triamcinolone ↓ elvitegravir ↓ cobicistat ↑ corticosteroids Coadministration with oral dexamethasone or other systemic corticosteroids that induce CYP3A may result in loss of therapeutic effect and development of resistance to elvitegravir. Consider alternative corticosteroids. Coadministration with corticosteroids whose exposures are significantly increased by strong CYP3A inhibitors can increase the risk for Cushing's syndrome and adrenal suppression. Alternative corticosteroids including beclomethasone and prednisolone (whose PK and/or PD are less affected by strong CYP3A inhibitors relative to other studied steroids) should be considered, particularly for long-term use [see Drug Interactions (7.6)]. Endothelin Receptor Antagonists: bosentan ↑ bosentan Coadministration of bosentan in patients on GENVOYA: In patients who have been receiving GENVOYA for at least 10 days, start bosentan at 62.5 mg once daily or every other day based upon individual tolerability. Coadministration of GENVOYA in patients on bosentan: Discontinue use of bosentan at least 36 hours prior to initiation of GENVOYA. After at least 10 days following the initiation of GENVOYA, resume bosentan at 62.5 mg once daily or every other day based upon individual tolerability. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors: atorvastatin ↑ atorvastatin For contraindicated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, [see Contraindications (4)] Initiate with the lowest starting dose of atorvastatin and titrate carefully while monitoring for safety. Hormonal Contraceptives: norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol ↑ norgestimate ↓ ethinyl estradiol The effects of increases in the concentration of the progestational component norgestimate are not fully known and can include increased risk of insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, acne, and venous thrombosis. The potential risks and benefits associated with coadministration of norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol with GENVOYA should be considered, particularly in women who have risk factors for these events. The effect of GENVOYA on other hormonal contraceptives (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive vaginal ring, or injectable contraceptives) or oral contraceptives containing progestogens other than norgestimate is not known; therefore, alternative (non-hormonal) methods of contraception can be considered. Immuno-suppressants: e.g., cyclosporine (CsA) sirolimus tacrolimus ↑ immuno-suppressants ↑ elvitegravir (with CsA) ↑ cobicistat (with CsA) Therapeutic monitoring of the immunosuppressive agents is recommended upon coadministration with GENVOYA. Monitor for adverse events associated with GENVOYA when coadministered with cyclosporine. Narcotic Analgesics: buprenorphine/ naloxone ↑ buprenorphine ↑ norbuprenorphine ↓ naloxone No dosage adjustment of buprenorphine/naloxone is required upon coadministration with GENVOYA. Patients should be closely monitored for sedation and cognitive effects. Inhaled Beta Agonist: salmeterol ↑ salmeterol Coadministration of salmeterol and GENVOYA is not recommended. Coadministration of salmeterol with GENVOYA may result in increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events associated with salmeterol, including QT prolongation, palpitations, and sinus tachycardia. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) Inhibitors: sildenafil tadalafil vardenafil ↑ PDE5 inhibitors For contraindicated PDE-5 inhibitors, [see Contraindications (4)] Coadministration with GENVOYA may result in an increase in PDE-5 inhibitor associated adverse reactions, including hypotension, syncope, visual disturbances, and priapism. Use of PDE-5 inhibitors for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH): Use of sildenafil is contraindicated when used for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The following dose adjustments are recommended for the use of tadalafil with GENVOYA: Coadministration of tadalafil in patients on GENVOYA: In patients receiving GENVOYA for at least 1 week, start tadalafil at 20 mg once daily. Increase tadalafil dose to 40 mg once daily based upon individual tolerability. Coadministration of GENVOYA in patients on tadalafil: Avoid use of tadalafil during the initiation of GENVOYA. Stop tadalafil at least 24 hours prior to starting GENVOYA. After at least one week following initiation of GENVOYA, resume tadalafil at 20 mg once daily. Increase tadalafil dose to 40 mg once daily based upon individual tolerability. Use of PDE-5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction: Sildenafil at a single dose not exceeding 25 mg in 48 hours, vardenafil at a single dose not exceeding 2.5 mg in 72 hours, or tadalafil at a single dose not exceeding 10 mg in 72 hours can be used with increased monitoring for PDE-5 inhibitor associated with adverse events. Sedative/hypnotics: buspirone zolpidem ↑ sedatives/hypnotics For contraindicated sedative/hypnotics, [see Contraindications (4)] With sedative/hypnotics, dose reduction may be necessary and clinical monitoring is recommended. 7.6 Drugs without Clinically Significant Interactions with GENVOYA Based on drug interaction studies conducted with the components of GENVOYA, no clinically significant drug interactions have been either observed or are expected when GENVOYA is combined with the following drugs: entecavir, famciclovir, H2 receptor antagonists, ledipasvir, lorazepam, methadone, proton pump inhibitors, ribavirin, sertraline, sofosbuvir, and velpatasvir.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA207561
Agency product number 4GDQ854U53
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 61958-1901
Date Last Revised 28-09-2017
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
Storage and handling Store below 30 °C (86 °F). Keep container tightly closed. Dispense only in original container.
Marketing authorisation holder Gilead Sciences, Inc.
Warnings WARNING: POST TREATMENT ACUTE EXACERBATION OF HEPATITIS B GENVOYA is not approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the safety and efficacy of GENVOYA have not been established in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and HBV. Severe acute exacerbations of hepatitis B have been reported in patients who are coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and have discontinued products containing emtricitabine and/or tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), and may occur with discontinuation of GENVOYA. Hepatic function should be monitored closely with both clinical and laboratory follow-up for at least several months in patients who are coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and discontinue GENVOYA. If appropriate, anti-hepatitis B therapy may be warranted [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. WARNING: POST TREATMENT ACUTE EXACERBATION OF HEPATITIS B See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. GENVOYA is not approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Severe acute exacerbations of hepatitis B have been reported in patients who are coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and have discontinued products containing emtricitabine and/or tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), and may occur with discontinuation of GENVOYA. Hepatic function should be monitored closely in these patients. If appropriate, anti-hepatitis B therapy may be warranted. (5.1)