Data from FDA (Food and Drug Administration, USA) - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 28 August 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE EYLEA is indicated for the treatment of: EYLEA is a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor indicated for the treatment of patients with: Neovascular (Wet) Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) (1.1) Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO) (1.2) Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) (1.3) Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) in Patients with DME (1.4) 1.1 Neovascular (Wet) Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) 1.2 Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO) 1.3 Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) 1.4 Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) in Patients with DME

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Ocular or periocular infection (4.1) Active intraocular inflammation (4.2) Hypersensitivity (4.3) 4.1 Ocular or Periocular Infections EYLEA is contraindicated in patients with ocular or periocular infections. 4.2 Active Intraocular Inflammation EYLEA is contraindicated in patients with active intraocular inflammation. 4.3 Hypersensitivity EYLEA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to aflibercept or any of the excipients in EYLEA. Hypersensitivity reactions may manifest as rash, pruritus, urticaria, severe anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions, or severe intraocular inflammation.
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following potentially serious adverse reactions are described elsewhere in the labeling: Hypersensitivity [see Contraindications (4.3) ] Endophthalmitis and retinal detachments [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ] Increase in intraocular pressure [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) ] Thromboembolic events [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3) ] The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) reported in patients receiving EYLEA were conjunctival hemorrhage, eye pain, cataract, vitreous floaters, intraocular pressure increased, and vitreous detachment. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Regeneron at 1-855-395-3248 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in other clinical trials of the same or another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. A total of 2711 patients treated with EYLEA constituted the safety population in seven phase 3 studies. Among those, 2110 patients were treated with the recommended dose of 2 mg. Serious adverse reactions related to the injection procedure have occurred in <0.1% of intravitreal injections with EYLEA including endophthalmitis and retinal detachment. The most common adverse reactions (≥5%) reported in patients receiving EYLEA were conjunctival hemorrhage, eye pain, cataract, vitreous floaters, intraocular pressure increased, and vitreous detachment. Neovascular (Wet) Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) The data described below reflect exposure to EYLEA in 1824 patients with wet AMD, including 1223 patients treated with the 2-mg dose, in 2 double-masked, active-controlled clinical studies (VIEW1 and VIEW2) for 12 months [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ]. Table 1: Most Common Adverse Reactions (≥1%) in Wet AMD Studies Adverse Reactions EYLEA (N=1824) Active Control (ranibizumab) (N=595) Conjunctival hemorrhage 25% 28% Eye pain 9% 9% Cataract 7% 7% Vitreous detachment 6% 6% Vitreous floaters 6% 7% Intraocular pressure increased 5% 7% Ocular hyperemia 4% 8% Corneal epithelium defect 4% 5% Detachment of the retinal pigment epithelium 3% 3% Injection site pain 3% 3% Foreign body sensation in eyes 3% 4% Lacrimation increased 3% 1% Vision blurred 2% 2% Intraocular inflammation 2% 3% Retinal pigment epithelium tear 2% 1% Injection site hemorrhage 1% 2% Eyelid edema 1% 2% Corneal edema 1% 1% Less common serious adverse reactions reported in <1% of the patients treated with EYLEA were hypersensitivity, retinal detachment, retinal tear, and endophthalmitis. Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO) The data described below reflect 6 months exposure to EYLEA with a monthly 2 mg dose in 218 patients following CRVO in 2 clinical studies (COPERNICUS and GALILEO) and 91 patients following BRVO in one clinical study (VIBRANT) [see Clinical Studies (14.2), (14.3) ]. Table 2: Most Common Adverse Reactions (≥1%) in RVO Studies Adverse Reactions CRVO BRVO EYLEA (N=218) Control (N=142) EYLEA (N=91) Control (N=92) Eye pain 13% 5% 4% 5% Conjunctival hemorrhage 12% 11% 20% 4% Intraocular pressure increased 8% 6% 2% 0% Corneal epithelium defect 5% 4% 2% 0% Vitreous floaters 5% 1% 1% 0% Ocular hyperemia 5% 3% 2% 2% Foreign body sensation in eyes 3% 5% 3% 0% Vitreous detachment 3% 4% 2% 0% Lacrimation increased 3% 4% 3% 0% Injection site pain 3% 1% 1% 0% Vision blurred 1% <1% 1% 1% Intraocular inflammation 1% 1% 0% 0% Cataract <1% 1% 5% 0% Eyelid edema <1% 1% 1% 0% Less common adverse reactions reported in <1% of the patients treated with EYLEA in the CRVO studies were corneal edema, retinal tear, hypersensitivity, and endophthalmitis. Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) The data described below reflect exposure to EYLEA in 578 patients with DME treated with the 2-mg dose in 2 double-masked, controlled clinical studies (VIVID and VISTA) from baseline to week 52 and from baseline to week 100 [see Clinical Studies (14.4) ]. Table 3: Most Common Adverse Reactions (≥1%) in DME Studies Adverse Reactions Baseline to Week 52 Baseline to Week 100 EYLEA (N=578) Control (N=287) EYLEA (N=578) Control (N=287) Conjunctival hemorrhage 28% 17% 31% 21% Eye pain 9% 6% 11% 9% Cataract 8% 9% 19% 17% Vitreous floaters 6% 3% 8% 6% Corneal epithelium defect 5% 3% 7% 5% Intraocular pressure increased 5% 3% 9% 5% Ocular hyperemia 5% 6% 5% 6% Vitreous detachment 3% 3% 8% 6% Foreign body sensation in eyes 3% 3% 3% 3% Lacrimation increased 3% 2% 4% 2% Vision blurred 2% 2% 3% 4% Intraocular inflammation 2% <1% 3% 1% Injection site pain 2% <1% 2% <1% Eyelid edema <1% 1% 2% 1% Less common adverse reactions reported in <1% of the patients treated with EYLEA were hypersensitivity, retinal detachment, retinal tear, corneal edema, and injection site hemorrhage. 6.2 Immunogenicity As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for an immune response in patients treated with EYLEA. The immunogenicity of EYLEA was evaluated in serum samples. The immunogenicity data reflect the percentage of patients whose test results were considered positive for antibodies to EYLEA in immunoassays. The detection of an immune response is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assays used, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to EYLEA with the incidence of antibodies to other products may be misleading. In the wet AMD, RVO, and DME studies, the pre-treatment incidence of immunoreactivity to EYLEA was approximately 1% to 3% across treatment groups. After dosing with EYLEA for 24-100 weeks, antibodies to EYLEA were detected in a similar percentage range of patients. There were no differences in efficacy or safety between patients with or without immunoreactivity.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Neovascular (Wet) Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg (0.05 mL) administered by intravitreal injection every 4 weeks (monthly) for the first 3 months, followed by 2 mg (0.05 mL) via intravitreal injection once every 8 weeks (2 months). (2.2) Although EYLEA may be dosed as frequently as 2 mg every 4 weeks (monthly), additional efficacy was not demonstrated in most patients when EYLEA was dosed every 4 weeks compared to every 8 weeks. Some patients may need every 4 week (monthly) dosing after the first 12 weeks (3 months). (2.2) Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO) The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg (0.05 mL) administered by intravitreal injection once every 4 weeks (monthly). (2.3) Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) and Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) in Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg (0.05 mL) administered by intravitreal injection every 4 weeks (monthly) for the first 5 injections followed by 2 mg (0.05 mL) via intravitreal injection once every 8 weeks (2 months). (2.4, 2.5) Although EYLEA may be dosed as frequently as 2 mg every 4 weeks (monthly), additional efficacy was not demonstrated in most patients when EYLEA was dosed every 4 weeks compared to every 8 weeks. Some patients may need every 4 week (monthly) dosing after the first 20 weeks (5 months). (2.4, 2.5) 2.1 Important Injection Instructions For ophthalmic intravitreal injection. EYLEA must only be administered by a qualified physician. 2.2 Neovascular (Wet) Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg (0.05 mL or 50 microliters) administered by intravitreal injection every 4 weeks (monthly) for the first 12 weeks (3 months), followed by 2 mg (0.05 mL) via intravitreal injection once every 8 weeks (2 months). Although EYLEA may be dosed as frequently as 2 mg every 4 weeks (monthly), additional efficacy was not demonstrated in most patients when EYLEA was dosed every 4 weeks compared to every 8 weeks [see Clinical Studies (14.1) ]. Some patients may need every 4 week (monthly) dosing after the first 12 weeks (3 months). 2.3 Macular Edema Following Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO) The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg (0.05 mL or 50 microliters) administered by intravitreal injection once every 4 weeks (monthly) [see Clinical Studies (14.2), (14.3) ]. 2.4 Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg (0.05 mL or 50 microliters) administered by intravitreal injection every 4 weeks (monthly) for the first 5 injections, followed by 2 mg (0.05 mL) via intravitreal injection once every 8 weeks (2 months). Although EYLEA may be dosed as frequently as 2 mg every 4 weeks (monthly), additional efficacy was not demonstrated in most patients when EYLEA was dosed every 4 weeks compared to every 8 weeks [see Clinical Studies (14.4) ]. Some patients may need every 4 week (monthly) dosing after the first 20 weeks (5 months). 2.5 Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) in Patients with DME The recommended dose for EYLEA is 2 mg (0.05 mL or 50 microliters) administered by intravitreal injection every 4 weeks (monthly) for the first 5 injections, followed by 2 mg (0.05 mL) via intravitreal injection once every 8 weeks (2 months). Although EYLEA may be dosed as frequently as 2 mg every 4 weeks (monthly), additional efficacy was not demonstrated in most patients when EYLEA was dosed every 4 weeks compared to every 8 weeks [see Clinical Studies (14.5) ]. Some patients may need every 4 week (monthly) dosing after the first 20 weeks (5 months). 2.6 Preparation for Administration EYLEA should be inspected visually prior to administration. If particulates, cloudiness, or discoloration are visible, the vial must not be used. Using aseptic technique, the intravitreal injection should be performed with a 30-gauge × ½-inch injection needle. Vial The glass vial is for single use only. Remove the protective plastic cap from the vial (see Figure 1). Clean the top of the vial with an alcohol wipe (see Figure 2). Remove the 19-gauge × 1½-inch, 5-micron, filter needle from its pouch and remove the 1-mL syringe supplied in the carton from its pouch. Attach the filter needle to the syringe by twisting it onto the Luer lock syringe tip (see Figure 3). Push the filter needle into the center of the vial stopper until the needle is completely inserted into the vial and the tip touches the bottom or bottom edge of the vial. Using aseptic technique withdraw all of the EYLEA vial contents into the syringe, keeping the vial in an upright position, slightly inclined to ease complete withdrawal. To deter the introduction of air, ensure the bevel of the filter needle is submerged into the liquid. Continue to tilt the vial during withdrawal keeping the bevel of the filter needle submerged in the liquid (see Figures 4a and 4b). Ensure that the plunger rod is drawn sufficiently back when emptying the vial in order to completely empty the filter needle. Remove the filter needle from the syringe and properly dispose of the filter needle. Note: Filter needle is not to be used for intravitreal injection. Remove the 30-gauge × ½-inch injection needle from the plastic pouch and attach the injection needle to the syringe by firmly twisting the injection needle onto the Luer lock syringe tip (see Figure 5). When ready to administer EYLEA, remove the plastic needle shield from the needle. Holding the syringe with the needle pointing up, check the syringe for bubbles. If there are bubbles, gently tap the syringe with your finger until the bubbles rise to the top (see Figure 6). To eliminate all of the bubbles and to expel excess drug, SLOWLY depress the plunger so that the plunger tip aligns with the line that marks 0.05 mL on the syringe (see Figures 7a and 7b). Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4a-b Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7a-b 2.7 Injection Procedure The intravitreal injection procedure should be carried out under controlled aseptic conditions, which include surgical hand disinfection and the use of sterile gloves, a sterile drape, and a sterile eyelid speculum (or equivalent). Adequate anesthesia and a topical broad–spectrum microbicide should be given prior to the injection. Immediately following the intravitreal injection, patients should be monitored for elevation in intraocular pressure. Appropriate monitoring may consist of a check for perfusion of the optic nerve head or tonometry. If required, a sterile paracentesis needle should be available. Following intravitreal injection, patients should be instructed to report any symptoms suggestive of endophthalmitis or retinal detachment (e.g., eye pain, redness of the eye, photophobia, blurring of vision) without delay [see Patient Counseling Information (17) ]. Each vial should only be used for the treatment of a single eye. If the contralateral eye requires treatment, a new vial should be used and the sterile field, syringe, gloves, drapes, eyelid speculum, filter, and injection needles should be changed before EYLEA is administered to the other eye. After injection, any unused product must be discarded.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary Adequate and well-controlled studies with EYLEA have not been conducted in pregnant women. Aflibercept produced adverse embryofetal effects in rabbits, including external, visceral, and skeletal malformations. A fetal No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) was not identified. At the lowest dose shown to produce adverse embryofetal effects, systemic exposures (based on AUC for free aflibercept) were approximately 6 times higher than AUC values observed in humans after a single intravitreal treatment at the recommended clinical dose [see Animal Data ]. Animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, and it is not known whether EYLEA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Based on the anti-VEGF mechanism of action for aflibercept [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.1) ], treatment with EYLEA may pose a risk to human embryofetal development. EYLEA should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively. Data Animal Data In two embryofetal development studies, aflibercept produced adverse embryofetal effects when administered every three days during organogenesis to pregnant rabbits at intravenous doses ≥3 mg per kg, or every six days during organogenesis at subcutaneous doses ≥0.1 mg per kg. Adverse embryofetal effects included increased incidences of postimplantation loss and fetal malformations, including anasarca, umbilical hernia, diaphragmatic hernia, gastroschisis, cleft palate, ectrodactyly, intestinal atresia, spina bifida, encephalomeningocele, heart and major vessel defects, and skeletal malformations (fused vertebrae, sternebrae, and ribs; supernumerary vertebral arches and ribs; and incomplete ossification). The maternal No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) in these studies was 3 mg per kg. Aflibercept produced fetal malformations at all doses assessed in rabbits and the fetal NOAEL was not identified. At the lowest dose shown to produce adverse embryofetal effects in rabbits (0.1 mg per kg), systemic exposure (AUC) of free aflibercept was approximately 6 times higher than systemic exposure (AUC) observed in humans after a single intravitreal dose of 2 mg. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There is no information regarding the presence of aflibercept in human milk, the effects of the drug on the breastfed infant, or the effects of the drug on milk production/excretion. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, and because the potential for absorption and harm to infant growth and development exists, EYLEA is not recommended during breastfeeding. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for EYLEA and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from EYLEA. 8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential Contraception Females of reproductive potential are advised to use effective contraception prior to the initial dose, during treatment, and for at least 3 months after the last intravitreal injection of EYLEA. Infertility There are no data regarding the effects of EYLEA on human fertility. Aflibercept adversely affected female and male reproductive systems in cynomolgus monkeys when administered by intravenous injection at a dose approximately 1500 times higher than the systemic level observed humans with an intravitreal dose of 2 mg. A No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) was not identified. These findings were reversible within 20 weeks after cessation of treatment [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1) ]. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of EYLEA in pediatric patients have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use In the clinical studies, approximately 76% (2049/2701) of patients randomized to treatment with EYLEA were ≥65 years of age and approximately 46% (1250/2701) were ≥75 years of age. No significant differences in efficacy or safety were seen with increasing age in these studies.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number BLA125387
Agency product number 15C2VL427D
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 61755-005
Date Last Revised 26-05-2017
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 1232154
Storage and handling Storage EYLEA should be refrigerated at 2°C to 8ºC (36°F to 46ºF). Do Not Freeze. Do not use beyond the date stamped on the carton and container label. Protect from light. Store in the original carton until time of use.
Marketing authorisation holder Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.