Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 15 June 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE Enbrel is a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker indicated for the treatment of: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) (1.1) Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) in patients aged 2 years or older (1.2) Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) (1.3) Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) (1.4) Plaque Psoriasis (PsO) in patients 4 years or older (1.5) 1.1 Rheumatoid Arthritis Enbrel is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, inducing major clinical response, inhibiting the progression of structural damage, and improving physical function in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Enbrel can be initiated in combination with methotrexate (MTX) or used alone. 1.2 Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Enbrel is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms of moderately to severely active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in patients ages 2 and older. 1.3 Psoriatic Arthritis Enbrel is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms, inhibiting the progression of structural damage of active arthritis, and improving physical function in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Enbrel can be used with or without methotrexate. 1.4 Ankylosing Spondylitis Enbrel is indicated for reducing signs and symptoms in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). 1.5 Plaque Psoriasis Enbrel is indicated for the treatment of patients 4 years or older with chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis (PsO) who are candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy.

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Enbrel should not be administered to patients with sepsis. Sepsis (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the labeling: Serious Infections [see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 )] Neurologic Reactions [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2 )] Malignancies [ see Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 )] Patients with Heart Failure [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4 )] Hematologic Reactions [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5 )] Hepatitis B Reactivation [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.6 )] Allergic Reactions [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.7 )] Autoimmunity [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.9 )] Immunosuppression [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.10 )] Most common adverse reactions (incidence > 5%): infections and injection site reactions. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Amgen Inc. at 1-800-77-AMGEN (1-800-772-6436) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Across clinical studies and postmarketing experience, the most serious adverse reactions with Enbrel were infections, neurologic events, CHF, and hematologic events [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5 )]. The most common adverse reactions with Enbrel were infections and injection site reactions. Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reactions rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not predict the rates observed in clinical practice. Adverse Reactions in Adult Patients w ith R heumatoid A rthritis , Psoriatic Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, or Plaque Psoriasis The data described below reflect exposure to Enbrel in 2219 adult patients with RA followed for up to 80 months, in 182 patients with PsA for up to 24 months, in 138 patients with AS for up to 6 months, and in 1204 adult patients with PsO for up to 18 months. In controlled trials, the proportion of Enbrel-treated patients who discontinued treatment due to adverse events was approximately 4% in the indications studied. Adverse Reactions in Pediatric Patients In general, the adverse reactions in pediatric patients were similar in frequency and type as those seen in adult patients [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5 ), Use in Specific Populations ( 8.4 ), and Clinical Studies ( 14.2 and 14.6 ) ]. In a 48-week clinical study in 211 children aged 4 to 17 years with pediatric PsO, the adverse reactions reported were similar to those seen in previous studies in adults with PsO. Long-term safety profile for up to 264 additional weeks was assessed in an open-label extension study and no new safety signals were identified. In open-label clinical studies of children with JIA, adverse reactions reported in those ages 2 to 4 years were similar to adverse reactions reported in older children. Infections Infections, including viral, bacterial, and fungal infections, have been observed in adult and pediatric patients. Infections have been noted in all body systems and have been reported in patients receiving Enbrel alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents. In controlled portions of trials, the types and severity of infection were similar between Enbrel and the respective control group (placebo or MTX for RA and PsA patients) in RA, PsA, AS and PsO patients. Rates of infections in RA and adult PsO patients are provided in Table 3 and Table 4, respectively. Infections consisted primarily of upper respiratory tract infection, sinusitis and influenza. In controlled portions of trials in RA, PsA, AS and PsO, the rates of serious infection were similar (0.8% in placebo, 3.6% in MTX, and 1.4% in Enbrel/Enbrel + MTX-treated groups). In clinical trials in rheumatologic indications, serious infections experienced by patients have included, but are not limited to, pneumonia, cellulitis, septic arthritis, bronchitis, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis, sepsis, abscess and osteomyelitis. In clinical trials in adult PsO patients, serious infections experienced by patients have included, but are not limited to, pneumonia, cellulitis, gastroenteritis, abscess and osteomyelitis. The rate of serious infections was not increased in open-label extension trials and was similar to that observed in Enbrel- and placebo-treated patients from controlled trials. In 66 global clinical trials of 17,505 patients (21,015 patient-years of therapy), tuberculosis was observed in approximately 0.02% of patients. In 17,696 patients (27,169 patient-years of therapy) from 38 clinical trials and 4 cohort studies in the U.S. and Canada, tuberculosis was observed in approximately 0.006% of patients. These studies include reports of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 ) ]. The types of infections reported in pediatric patients with PsO and JIA were generally mild and consistent with those commonly seen in the general pediatric population. Two JIA patients developed varicella infection and signs and symptoms of aseptic meningitis, which resolved without sequelae. Injection Site Reactions In placebo-controlled trials in rheumatologic indications, approximately 37% of patients treated with Enbrel developed injection site reactions. In controlled trials in patients with PsO, 15% of adult patients and 7% of pediatric patients treated with Enbrel developed injection site reactions during the first 3 months of treatment. All injection site reactions were described as mild to moderate (erythema, itching, pain, swelling, bleeding, bruising) and generally did not necessitate drug discontinuation. Injection site reactions generally occurred in the first month and subsequently decreased in frequency. The mean duration of injection site reactions was 3 to 5 days. Seven percent of patients experienced redness at a previous injection site when subsequent injections were given. Other Adverse Reactions Table 3 summarizes adverse reactions reported in adult RA patients. The types of adverse reactions seen in patients with PsA or AS were similar to the types of adverse reactions seen in patients with RA. Table 3 . Percent of Adult RA Patients Experiencing Adverse Reactions in Controlled Clinical Trials Placebo Controlled a (Studies I, II, and a Phase 2 S tudy) Active Controlled b (Study III) Placebo (N = 152) E nbrel c (N = 349) MTX (N = 217) E nbrel c (N = 415) Reaction Percent of Patients Percent of Patients Infectiond (total) 39 50 86 81 Upper Respiratory Infectionse 30 38 70 65 Non-upper Respiratory Infections 15 21 59 54 Injection Site Reactions 11 37 18 43 Diarrhea 9 8 16 16 Rash 2 3 19 13 Pruritus 1 2 5 5 Pyrexia - 3 4 2 Urticaria 1 - 4 2 Hypersensitivity - - 1 1 a Includes data from the 6-month study in which patients received concurrent MTX therapy in both arms. b Study duration of 2 years. c Any dose. d Includes bacterial, viral and fungal infections. e Most frequent Upper Respiratory Infections were upper respiratory tract infection, sinusitis and influenza. In placebo-controlled adult PsO trials, the percentages of patients reporting adverse reactions in the 50 mg twice a week dose group were similar to those observed in the 25 mg twice a week dose group or placebo group. Table 4 summarizes adverse reactions reported in adult PsO patients from Studies I and II. Table 4 . Percent of Adult PsO Patients Experiencing Adverse Reactions in Placebo-Controlled Portions of Clinical Trials (Studies I & II) Placebo (N = 359) Enbrel a (N = 876) Reaction Percent of Patients Infectionb (total) 28 27 Non-upper Respiratory Infections 14 12 Upper Respiratory Infectionsc 17 17 Injection Site Reactions 6 15 Diarrhea 2 3 Rash 1 1 Pruritus 2 1 Urticaria - 1 Hypersensitivity - 1 Pyrexia 1 - a Includes 25 mg subcutaneous (SC) once weekly (QW), 25 mg SC twice weekly (BIW), 50 mg SC QW, and 50 mg SC BIW doses. b Includes bacterial, viral and fungal infections. c Most frequent Upper Respiratory Infections were upper respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngitis and sinusitis. 6.2 Immunogenicity As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to etanercept in the studies described below with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading. Immunogenicity Patients with RA, PsA, AS or PsO were tested at multiple time points for antibodies to etanercept. Antibodies to the TNF receptor portion or other protein components of the Enbrel drug product were detected at least once in sera of approximately 6% of adult patients with RA, PsA, AS or PsO. These antibodies were all non-neutralizing. Results from JIA patients were similar to those seen in adult RA patients treated with Enbrel. In adult PsO studies that evaluated the exposure of etanercept for up to 120 weeks, the percentage of patients testing positive at the assessed time points of 24, 48, 72 and 96 weeks ranged from 3.6%-8.7% and were all non-neutralizing. The percentage of patients testing positive increased with an increase in the duration of study; however, the clinical significance of this finding is unknown. No apparent correlation of antibody development to clinical response or adverse events was observed. The immunogenicity data of Enbrel beyond 120 weeks of exposure are unknown. In pediatric PsO studies, approximately 10% of subjects developed antibodies to etanercept by Week 48 and approximately 16% of subjects developed antibodies to etanercept by Week 264. All of these antibodies were non-neutralizing. However, because of the limitations of the immunogenicity assays, the incidence of binding and neutralizing antibodies may not have been reliably determined. The data reflect the percentage of patients whose test results were considered positive for antibodies to etanercept in an ELISA assay, and are highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Autoantibodies Patients with RA had serum samples tested for autoantibodies at multiple time points. In RA Studies I and II, the percentage of patients evaluated for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) who developed new positive ANA (titer ≥ 1:40) was higher in patients treated with Enbrel (11%) than in placebo-treated patients (5%). The percentage of patients who developed new positive anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies was also higher by radioimmunoassay (15% of patients treated with Enbrel compared to 4% of placebo-treated patients) and by Crithidia luciliae assay (3% of patients treated with Enbrel compared to none of placebo-treated patients). The proportion of patients treated with Enbrel who developed anticardiolipin antibodies was similarly increased compared to placebo-treated patients. In RA Study III, no pattern of increased autoantibody development was seen in Enbrel patients compared to MTX patients [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.9 )]. 6.3 Postmarketing Experience Adverse reactions have been reported during post approval use of Enbrel in adults and pediatric patients. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to Enbrel exposure. Adverse reactions are listed by body system below: Blood and lymphatic system disorders: pancytopenia, anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphadenopathy, aplastic anemia [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.5 )] Cardiac disorders: congestive heart failure [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.4 )] Gastrointestinal disorders: inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) General disorders: angioedema, chest pain Hepatobiliary disorders: autoimmune hepatitis, elevated transaminases, hepatitis B reactivation Immune disorders: macrophage activation syndrome, systemic vasculitis, sarcoidosis Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: lupus-like syndrome Neoplasms benign, malignant, and unspecified: melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, Merkel cell carcinoma [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 )] Nervous system disorders: convulsions, multiple sclerosis, demyelination, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, paresthesias [see Warning s and Precaution s ( 5.2 )] Ocular disorders: uveitis, scleritis Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: interstitial lung disease Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: cutaneous lupus erythematosus, cutaneous vasculitis (including leukocytoclastic vasculitis), erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, subcutaneous nodule, new or worsening psoriasis (all sub-types including pustular and palmoplantar) Opportunistic infections, including atypical mycobacterial infection, herpes zoster, aspergillosis and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, and protozoal infections have also been reported in postmarketing use. Rare (< 0.1%) cases of IBD have been reported in JIA patients receiving Enbrel, which is not effective for the treatment of IBD.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Enbrel is administered by subcutaneous injection. Patient Population Recommended Dose and Frequency Adult RA and PsA (2.1) 50 mg once weekly with or without methotrexate (MTX) AS (2.1) 50 mg once weekly Adult PsO (2.1) 50 mg twice weekly for 3 months, followed by 50 mg once weekly Pediatric PsO or JIA (2.2) 0.8 mg/kg weekly, with a maximum of 50 mg per week 2.1 Adult Patients Enbrel is administered by subcutaneous injection. Table 1. Dosing and Administration for Adult Patients Patient Population Recommended Dosage Strength and Frequency Adult RA, AS, and PsA 50 mg weekly Adult PsO Starting Dose: 50 mg twice weekly for 3 months Maintenance Dose: 50 mg once weekly See the Enbrel (etanercept) “Instructions for Use” insert for detailed information on injection site selection and dose administration [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.3 ) and Patient Counseling Information ( 17 )]. Adult R heumatoid A rthritis , A nkylosing S pondylitis , and Psoriatic Arthritis Patients Methotrexate, glucocorticoids, salicylates, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or analgesics may be continued during treatment with Enbrel. Based on a study of 50 mg Enbrel twice weekly in patients with RA that suggested higher incidence of adverse reactions but similar American College of Rheumatology (ACR) response rates, doses higher than 50 mg per week are not recommended. Adult Plaque Psoriasis Patients In addition to the 50 mg twice weekly recommended starting dose, starting doses of 25 mg or 50 mg per week were shown to be efficacious. The proportion of responders was related to Enbrel dosage [ see Clinical Studies ( 14.5 ) ]. 2.2 Pediatric Patients Enbrel is administered by subcutaneous injection. Table 2. Dosing and Administration for Pediatric Patients (PsO or JIA ) Pediatric Patients Weight Recommended Dose 63 kg (138 pounds) or more 50 mg weekly Less than 63 kg (138 pounds) 0.8 mg/kg weekly To achieve pediatric doses other than 25 mg or 50 mg, use reconstituted Enbrel lyophilized powder. Doses of Enbrel higher than those described in Table 2 have not been studied in pediatric patients. In JIA patients, glucocorticoids, NSAIDs, or analgesics may be continued during treatment with Enbrel. 2.3 Preparation of Enbrel Enbrel is intended for use under the guidance and supervision of a physician. Patients may self-inject when deemed appropriate and if they receive medical follow-up, as necessary. Patients should not self-administer until they receive proper training in how to prepare and administer the correct dose. Administer injections subcutaneously in the thigh, abdomen or outer area of the upper arm. The following components contain dry natural rubber (a derivative of latex), which may cause allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to latex: the needle cover of the prefilled syringe, the needle cover within the white cap of the SureClick autoinjector, and the needle cover within the purple cap of the Enbrel Mini cartridge [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.7 )]. The Enbrel (etanercept) “Instructions for Use” insert for each presentation contains more detailed instructions on injection site selection and the preparation of Enbrel. Preparation of E nbrel Single- dose Prefilled Syringe For a more comfortable injection, leave Enbrel prefilled syringes at room temperature for about 15 to 30 minutes before injecting. DO NOT remove the needle cover while allowing the prefilled syringe to reach room temperature. Inspect visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. There may be small white particles of protein in the solution. This is not unusual for proteinaceous solutions. The solution should not be used if discolored or cloudy, or if foreign particulate matter is present. When using the Enbrel single-dose prefilled syringe, check to see if the amount of liquid in the prefilled syringe falls between the two purple fill level indicator lines on the syringe. If the syringe does not have the right amount of liquid, DO NOT USE THAT SYRINGE. Preparation of Enbrel Single- dose Prefilled SureClick Autoinjector Leave the autoinjector at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before injecting. DO NOT remove the needle cover while allowing the prefilled syringe to reach room temperature. Inspect visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. There may be small white particles of protein in the solution. This is not unusual for proteinaceous solutions. The solution should not be used if discolored or cloudy, or if foreign particulate matter is present. Preparation of E nbrel Lyophilized Powder in a Multiple- do se Vial Enbrel lyophilized powder should be reconstituted aseptically with 1 mL of the supplied Sterile Bacteriostatic Water for Injection, USP (0.9% benzyl alcohol), giving a solution of 1 mL containing 25 mg of Enbrel. A vial adapter is supplied for use when reconstituting the lyophilized powder. However, the vial adapter should not be used if multiple doses are going to be withdrawn from the vial. If the vial will be used for multiple doses, a 25-gauge needle should be used for reconstituting and withdrawing Enbrel, and the supplied “Mixing Date:” sticker should be attached to the vial and the date of reconstitution entered. Reconstituted solution must be refrigerated at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C) and used within 14 days. Discard reconstituted solution after 14 days because product stability and sterility cannot be assured after 14 days. DO NOT store reconstituted Enbrel solution at room temperature. For a more comfortable injection, leave the Enbrel dose tray at room temperature for about 15 to 30 minutes before injecting. If using the vial adapter, twist the vial adapter onto the diluent syringe. Then, place the vial adapter over the Enbrel vial and insert the vial adapter into the vial stopper. Push down on the plunger to inject the diluent into the Enbrel vial. If using a 25-gauge needle to reconstitute and withdraw Enbrel, the diluent should be injected very slowly into the Enbrel vial. It is normal for some foaming to occur. Keeping the diluent syringe in place, gently swirl the contents of the Enbrel vial during dissolution. To avoid excessive foaming, do not shake or vigorously agitate. Generally, dissolution of Enbrel takes less than 10 minutes. Do not use the solution if discolored or cloudy, or if particulate matter remains. Withdraw the correct dose of reconstituted solution into the syringe. Some foam or bubbles may remain in the vial. Remove the syringe from the vial adapter or remove the 25-gauge needle from the syringe. Attach a 27-gauge needle to inject Enbrel. The contents of one vial of Enbrel solution should not be mixed with, or transferred into, the contents of another vial of Enbrel. No other medications should be added to solutions containing Enbrel, and do not reconstitute Enbrel with other diluents. Do not filter reconstituted solution during preparation or administration. Preparation of Enbrel Mini ™ single-dose prefilled cartridge using the AutoTouch ™ reusable autoinjector Leave Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before injecting. DO NOT remove the purple cap while allowing the cartridge to reach room temperature. Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. There may be small white particles of protein in the solution. This is not unusual for proteinaceous solutions. The solution should not be used if discolored or cloudy, or if foreign particulate matter is present. To use AutoTouch reusable autoinjector, open the door by pushing the door button and inserting Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge into AutoTouch. When inserted correctly, Enbrel Mini single-dose prefilled cartridge will slide freely and completely into the door. Close the door and AutoTouch reusable autoinjector is ready for injection. 2.4 Monitoring to Assess Safety Prior to initiating Enbrel and periodically during therapy, patients should be evaluated for active tuberculosis and tested for latent infection [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 )].
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary Available studies with use of etanercept during pregnancy do not reliably support an association between etanercept and major birth defects. Clinical data are available from the Organization of Teratology Information Specialists (OTIS) Enbrel Pregnancy Registry in women with rheumatic diseases or psoriasis and a Scandinavian study in pregnant women with chronic inflammatory disease. Both the OTIS Registry and the Scandinavian study showed the proportion of liveborn infants with major birth defects was higher for women exposed to etanercept compared to diseased etanercept unexposed women. However, the lack of pattern of major birth defects is reassuring and differences between exposure groups (eg. disease severity) may have impacted the occurrence of birth defects (see Data). In animal reproduction studies with pregnant rats and rabbits, no fetal harm or malformations were observed with subcutaneous administration of etanercept during the period of organogenesis at doses that achieved systemic exposures 48 to 58 times the exposure in patients treated with 50 mg Enbrel once weekly (see Data). All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. In the United States, about 2-4% of liveborn babies have a major birth defect and about 15-20% of pregnancies end in miscarriage, regardless of drug exposure. Clinical Considerations Fetal/Neonatal adverse reactions The risk of fetal/neonatal adverse reactions with in utero exposure to Enbrel is unknown. Risks and benefits should be considered prior to administering live or live-attenuated vaccines to infants exposed to Enbrel in utero [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.4 )]. Data Human Data A prospective cohort pregnancy registry conducted by OTIS in the US and Canada between 2000 and 2012 compared the risk of major birth defects in liveborn infants of women with rheumatic diseases or psoriasis exposed to etanercept in the first trimester. The proportion of major birth defects among liveborn infants in the etanercept-exposed (N = 319) and diseased etanercept unexposed cohorts (N = 144) was 9.4% and 3.5%, respectively. The findings showed no statistically significant increased risk of minor birth defects and no pattern of major or minor birth defects. A Scandinavian study compared the risk of major birth defects in liveborn infants of women with chronic inflammatory disease (CID) exposed to TNF-inhibitors during early pregnancy. Women were identified from the Danish (2004-2012) and Swedish (2006-2012) population based health registers. The proportion of major birth defects among liveborn infants in the etanercept-exposed (N=344) and CID etanercept unexposed cohorts (N = 21,549) was 7.0% and 4.7%, respectively. Overall, while both the OTIS Registry and Scandinavian study show a higher proportion of major birth defects in etanercept-exposed patients compared to diseased etanercept unexposed patients, the lack of pattern of birth defects is reassuring and differences between exposure groups (e.g. disease severity) may have impacted the occurrence of birth defects. Three case reports from the literature showed that cord blood levels of etanercept at delivery, in infants born to women administered etanercept during pregnancy, were between 3% and 32% of the maternal serum level. Animal Data In embryofetal development studies with etanercept administered during the period of organogenesis to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 6 through 20 or pregnant rabbits from GD 6 through 18, there was no evidence of fetal malformations or embryotoxicity in rats or rabbits at respective doses that achieved systemic exposures 48 to 58 times the exposure in patients treated with 50 mg Enbrel once weekly (on an AUC basis with maternal subcutaneous doses up to 30 mg/kg/day in rats and 40 mg/kg/day in rabbits). In a peri-and post-natal development study with pregnant rats that received etanercept during organogenesis and the later gestational period from GD 6 through 21, development of pups through post-natal day 4 was unaffected at doses that achieved exposures 48 times the exposure in patients treated with 50 mg Enbrel once weekly (on an AUC basis with maternal subcutaneous doses up to 30 mg/kg/day). 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary Limited data from published literature show that etanercept is present in low levels in human milk and minimally absorbed by a breastfed infant. No data are available on the effects of etanercept on the breastfed child or the effects on milk production. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for Enbrel and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from the drug or from the underlying maternal condition. 8.4 Pediatric Use Enbrel has been studied in 69 children with moderately to severely active polyarticular JIA aged 2 to 17 years. Enbrel has been studied in 211 pediatric patients with moderate to severe PsO aged 4 to 17 years. Enbrel has not been studied in children < 2 years of age with JIA and < 4 years of age with PsO. For pediatric specific safety information concerning malignancies and inflammatory bowel disease [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.3 ) and Adverse Reactions ( 6.2 )]. The clinical significance of infant exposure to Enbrel in utero is unknown. The safety of administering live or live-attenuated vaccines in exposed infants is unknown. Risks and benefits should be considered prior to administering live or live-attenuated vaccines to exposed infants. For pediatric specific safety information concerning vaccinations, [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.8 ) and Drug Interactions ( 7.1 )]. 8.5 Geriatric Use A total of 480 RA patients ages 65 years or older have been studied in clinical trials. In PsO randomized clinical trials, a total of 138 out of 1965 patients treated with Enbrel or placebo were age 65 or older. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, but the number of geriatric PsO patients is too small to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. Because there is a higher incidence of infections in the elderly population in general, caution should be used in treating the elderly. 8.6 Use in Diabetics There have been reports of hypoglycemia following initiation of Enbrel therapy in patients receiving medication for diabetes, necessitating a reduction in anti-diabetic medication in some of these patients.

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Specific drug interaction studies have not been conducted with Enbrel. Live vaccines – should not be given with Enbrel (5.8, 7.1) Anakinra – increased risk of serious infection (5.12, 7.2) Abatacept – increased risk of serious adverse events, including infections (5.12, 7.2) Cyclophosphamide – use with Enbrel is not recommended (7.3) 7.1 Vaccines Most PsA patients receiving Enbrel were able to mount effective B-cell immune responses to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, but titers in aggregate were moderately lower and fewer patients had 2-fold rises in titers compared to patients not receiving Enbrel. The clinical significance of this is unknown. Patients receiving Enbrel may receive concurrent vaccinations, except for live vaccines. No data are available on the secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines in patients receiving Enbrel. Patients with a significant exposure to varicella virus should temporarily discontinue Enbrel therapy and be considered for prophylactic treatment with varicella zoster immune globulin [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.8 , 5.10 ) ]. 7.2 Immune-Modulating Biologic Products In a study in which patients with active RA were treated for up to 24 weeks with concurrent Enbrel and anakinra therapy, a 7% rate of serious infections was observed, which was higher than that observed with Enbrel alone (0%) [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.12 ) ] and did not result in higher ACR response rates compared to Enbrel alone. The most common infections consisted of bacterial pneumonia (4 cases) and cellulitis (4 cases). One patient with pulmonary fibrosis and pneumonia died due to respiratory failure. Two percent of patients treated concurrently with Enbrel and anakinra developed neutropenia (ANC < 1 x 109/L). In clinical studies, concurrent administration of abatacept and Enbrel resulted in increased incidences of serious adverse events, including infections, and did not demonstrate increased clinical benefit [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.12 )]. 7.3 Cyclophosphamide The use of Enbrel in patients receiving concurrent cyclophosphamide therapy is not recommended [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.11 ) ]. 7.4 Sulfasalazine Patients in a clinical study who were on established therapy with sulfasalazine, to which Enbrel was added, were noted to develop a mild decrease in mean neutrophil counts in comparison to groups treated with either Enbrel or sulfasalazine alone. The clinical significance of this observation is unknown.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number BLA103795
Agency product number OP401G7OJC
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 58406-456,58406-446,58406-455,58406-435,58406-425,58406-445
Date Last Revised 25-05-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
Marketing authorisation holder Immunex Corporation
Warnings WARNING: SERIOUS INFECTIONS and MALIGNANCIES SERIOUS INFECTIONS Patients treated with Enbrel are at increased risk for developing serious infections that may lead to hospitalization or death [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1 ) and Adverse Reactions ( 6 )]. Most patients who developed these infections were taking concomitant immunosuppressants such as methotrexate or corticosteroids. Enbrel should be discontinued if a patient develops a serious infection or sepsis. Reported infections include: Active tuberculosis, including reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis have frequently presented with disseminated or extrapulmonary disease. Patients should be tested for latent tuberculosis before Enbrel use and during therapy. Treatment for latent infection should be initiated prior to Enbrel use. Invasive fungal infections, including histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, candidiasis, aspergillosis, blastomycosis, and pneumocystosis. Patients with histoplasmosis or other invasive fungal infections may present with disseminated, rather than localized, disease. Antigen and antibody testing for histoplasmosis may be negative in some patients with active infection. Empiric anti-fungal therapy should be considered in patients at risk for invasive fungal infections who develop severe systemic illness. Bacterial, viral, and other infections due to opportunistic pathogens, including Legionella and Listeria. The risks and benefits of treatment with Enbrel should be carefully considered prior to initiating therapy in patients with chronic or recurrent infection. Patients should be closely monitored for the development of signs and symptoms of infection during and after treatment with Enbrel, including the possible development of tuberculosis in patients who tested negative for latent tuberculosis infection prior to initiating therapy. MALIGNANCIES Lymphoma and other malignancies, some fatal, have been reported in children and adolescent patients treated with TNF blockers, including Enbrel. WARNING : SERIOUS INFECTIONS and MALIGNANCIES See f ull p rescribing i nformation for complete b oxed w arning. SERIOUS INFECTIONS Increased risk of serious infections leading to hospitalization or death, including tuberculosis (TB), bacterial sepsis, invasive fungal infections (such as histoplasmosis), and infections due to other opportunistic pathogens. ( 5.1 ) Enbrel should be discontinued if a patient develops a serious infection or sepsis during treatment. ( 5.1 ) Perform test for latent TB; if positive, start treatment for TB prior to starting Enbrel. ( 5.1 ) Monitor all patients for active TB during treatment, even if initial latent TB test is negative. ( 5.1 ) MALIGNANCIES Lymphoma and other malignancies, some fatal, have been reported in children and adolescent patients treated wit h TNF blockers, including Enbrel . ( 5.3 )