Data from FDA - Curated by Marshall Pearce - Last updated 07 December 2017

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE ELIQUIS is a factor Xa inhibitor indicated: •to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. (1.1) •for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients who have undergone hip or knee replacement surgery. (1.2) •for the treatment of DVT and PE, and for the reduction in the risk of recurrent DVT and PE following initial therapy. (1.3, 1.4, 1.5) 1.1 Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation ELIQUIS® (apixaban) is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. 1.2 Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis Following Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery ELIQUIS is indicated for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients who have undergone hip or knee replacement surgery. 1.3 Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis ELIQUIS is indicated for the treatment of DVT. 1.4 Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism ELIQUIS is indicated for the treatment of PE. 1.5 Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT and PE ELIQUIS is indicated to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE following initial therapy.

Learning Zones

An epgonline.org Learning Zone (LZ) is an area of the site dedicated to providing detailed self-directed medical education about a disease, condition or procedure.

Oral Anticoagulation Reversal

Oral Anticoagulation Reversal

Experts discuss the use of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in the treatment and prevention of stroke, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in atrial fibrillation patients.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL)

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL)

Refine your knowledge of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) with information on pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment options and more

+ 1 more

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

View highlights from recent congresses presented in new expert videos with leading physicians.

+ 7 more

Load more

Related Content

Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS ELIQUIS is contraindicated in patients with the following conditions: •Active pathological bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Adverse Reactions (6.1)] •Severe hypersensitivity reaction to ELIQUIS (e.g., anaphylactic reactions) [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)] •Active pathological bleeding (4) •Severe hypersensitivity to ELIQUIS (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the prescribing information. •Increased risk of thrombotic events after premature discontinuation [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] •Bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] •Spinal/epidural anesthesia or puncture [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] Most common adverse reactions (>1%) are related to bleeding. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Bristol-Myers Squibb at 1-800-721-5072 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation The safety of ELIQUIS was evaluated in the ARISTOTLE and AVERROES studies [see Clinical Studies (14)], including 11,284 patients exposed to ELIQUIS 5 mg twice daily and 602 patients exposed to ELIQUIS 2.5 mg twice daily. The duration of ELIQUIS exposure was ≥12 months for 9375 patients and ≥24 months for 3369 patients in the two studies. In ARISTOTLE, the mean duration of exposure was 89 weeks (>15,000 patient-years). In AVERROES, the mean duration of exposure was approximately 59 weeks (>3000 patient-years). The most common reason for treatment discontinuation in both studies was for bleeding-related adverse reactions; in ARISTOTLE this occurred in 1.7% and 2.5% of patients treated with ELIQUIS and warfarin, respectively, and in AVERROES, in 1.5% and 1.3% on ELIQUIS and aspirin, respectively. Bleeding in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation in ARISTOTLE and AVERROES Tables 1 and 2 show the number of patients experiencing major bleeding during the treatment period and the bleeding rate (percentage of subjects with at least one bleeding event per 100 patient-years) in ARISTOTLE and AVERROES. Table 1: Bleeding Events in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation in ARISTOTLE* ELIQUIS N=9088 n (per 100 pt-year) Warfarin N=9052 n (per 100 pt-year) Hazard Ratio (95% CI) P-value Major† 327 (2.13) 462 (3.09) 0.69 (0.60, 0.80) <0.0001 Intracranial (ICH)‡ 52 (0.33) 125 (0.82) 0.41 (0.30, 0.57) - Hemorrhagic stroke§ 38 (0.24) 74 (0.49) 0.51 (0.34, 0.75) - Other ICH 15 (0.10) 51 (0.34) 0.29 (0.16, 0.51) - Gastrointestinal (GI)¶ 128 (0.83) 141 (0.93) 0.89 (0.70, 1.14) - Fatal** 10 (0.06) 37 (0.24) 0.27 (0.13, 0.53) - Intracranial 4 (0.03) 30 (0.20) 0.13 (0.05, 0.37) - Non-intracranial 6 (0.04) 7 (0.05) 0.84 (0.28, 2.15) - * Bleeding events within each subcategory were counted once per subject, but subjects may have contributed events to multiple endpoints. Bleeding events were counted during treatment or within 2 days of stopping study treatment (on-treatment period). † Defined as clinically overt bleeding accompanied by one or more of the following: a decrease in hemoglobin of ≥2 g/dL, a transfusion of 2 or more units of packed red blood cells, bleeding at a critical site: intracranial, intraspinal, intraocular, pericardial, intra-articular, intramuscular with compartment syndrome, retroperitoneal or with fatal outcome. ‡ Intracranial bleed includes intracerebral, intraventricular, subdural, and subarachnoid bleeding. Any type of hemorrhagic stroke was adjudicated and counted as an intracranial major bleed. § On-treatment analysis based on the safety population, compared to ITT analysis presented in Section 14. ¶ GI bleed includes upper GI, lower GI, and rectal bleeding. ** Fatal bleeding is an adjudicated death with the primary cause of death as intracranial bleeding or non-intracranial bleeding during the on-treatment period. In ARISTOTLE, the results for major bleeding were generally consistent across most major subgroups including age, weight, CHADS2 score (a scale from 0 to 6 used to estimate risk of stroke, with higher scores predicting greater risk), prior warfarin use, geographic region, and aspirin use at randomization (Figure 1). Subjects treated with apixaban with diabetes bled more (3.0% per year) than did subjects without diabetes (1.9% per year). Figure 1: Major Bleeding Hazard Ratios by Baseline Characteristics – ARISTOTLE Study Note: The figure above presents effects in various subgroups, all of which are baseline characteristics and all of which were prespecified, if not the groupings. The 95% confidence limits that are shown do not take into account how many comparisons were made, nor do they reflect the effect of a particular factor after adjustment for all other factors. Apparent homogeneity or heterogeneity among groups should not be over-interpreted. Table 2: Bleeding Events in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation in AVERROES ELIQUIS N=2798 n (%/year) Aspirin N=2780 n (%/year) Hazard Ratio (95% CI) P-value Events associated with each endpoint were counted once per subject, but subjects may have contributed events to multiple endpoints. Major 45 (1.41) 29 (0.92) 1.54 (0.96, 2.45) 0.07 Fatal 5 (0.16) 5 (0.16) 0.99 (0.23, 4.29) - Intracranial 11 (0.34) 11 (0.35) 0.99 (0.39, 2.51) - ARISTOTLE Major Bleeding Forest Plot Other Adverse Reactions Hypersensitivity reactions (including drug hypersensitivity, such as skin rash, and anaphylactic reactions, such as allergic edema) and syncope were reported in <1% of patients receiving ELIQUIS. Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis Following Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery The safety of ELIQUIS has been evaluated in 1 Phase II and 3 Phase III studies including 5924 patients exposed to ELIQUIS 2.5 mg twice daily undergoing major orthopedic surgery of the lower limbs (elective hip replacement or elective knee replacement) treated for up to 38 days. In total, 11% of the patients treated with ELIQUIS 2.5 mg twice daily experienced adverse reactions. Bleeding results during the treatment period in the Phase III studies are shown in Table 3. Bleeding was assessed in each study beginning with the first dose of double-blind study drug. Table 3: Bleeding During the Treatment Period in Patients Undergoing Elective Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery Bleeding Endpoint* ADVANCE-3 Hip Replacement Surgery ADVANCE-2 Knee Replacement Surgery ADVANCE-1 Knee Replacement Surgery * All bleeding criteria included surgical site bleeding. † Includes 13 subjects with major bleeding events that occurred before the first dose of apixaban (administered 12 to 24 hours post surgery). ‡ Includes 5 subjects with major bleeding events that occurred before the first dose of apixaban (administered 12 to 24 hours post surgery). § Intracranial, intraspinal, intraocular, pericardial, an operated joint requiring re-operation or intervention, intramuscular with compartment syndrome, or retroperitoneal. Bleeding into an operated joint requiring re-operation or intervention was present in all patients with this category of bleeding. Events and event rates include one enoxaparin-treated patient in ADVANCE-1 who also had intracranial hemorrhage. ¶ CRNM = clinically relevant nonmajor. ELIQUIS 2.5 mg po bid 35±3 days Enoxaparin 40 mg sc qd 35±3 days ELIQUIS 2.5 mg po bid 12±2 days Enoxaparin 40 mg sc qd 12±2 days ELIQUIS 2.5 mg po bid 12±2 days Enoxaparin 30 mg sc q12h 12±2 days First dose 12 to 24 hours post surgery First dose 9 to 15 hours prior to surgery First dose 12 to 24 hours post surgery First dose 9 to 15 hours prior to surgery First dose 12 to 24 hours post surgery First dose 12 to 24 hours post surgery All treated N=2673 N=2659 N=1501 N=1508 N=1596 N=1588 Major (including surgical site) 22 (0.82%)† 18 (0.68%) 9 (0.60%)‡ 14 (0.93%) 11 (0.69%) 22 (1.39%) Fatal 0 0 0 0 0 1 (0.06%) Hgb decrease ≥2 g/dL 13 (0.49%) 10 (0.38%) 8 (0.53%) 9 (0.60%) 10 (0.63%) 16 (1.01%) Transfusion of ≥2 units RBC 16 (0.60%) 14 (0.53%) 5 (0.33%) 9 (0.60%) 9 (0.56%) 18 (1.13%) Bleed at critical site§ 1 (0.04%) 1 (0.04%) 1 (0.07%) 2 (0.13%) 1 (0.06%) 4 (0.25%) Major + CRNM¶ 129 (4.83%) 134 (5.04%) 53 (3.53%) 72 (4.77%) 46 (2.88%) 68 (4.28%) All 313 (11.71%) 334 (12.56%) 104 (6.93%) 126 (8.36%) 85 (5.33%) 108 (6.80%) Adverse reactions occurring in ≥1% of patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery in the 1 Phase II study and the 3 Phase III studies are listed in Table 4. Table 4: Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥1% of Patients in Either Group Undergoing Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery ELIQUIS, n (%) 2.5 mg po bid N=5924 Enoxaparin, n (%) 40 mg sc qd or 30 mg sc q12h N=5904 Nausea 153 (2.6) 159 (2.7) Anemia (including postoperative and hemorrhagic anemia, and respective laboratory parameters) 153 (2.6) 178 (3.0) Contusion 83 (1.4) 115 (1.9) Hemorrhage (including hematoma, and vaginal and urethral hemorrhage) 67 (1.1) 81 (1.4) Postprocedural hemorrhage (including postprocedural hematoma, wound hemorrhage, vessel puncture-site hematoma, and catheter-site hemorrhage) 54 (0.9) 60 (1.0) Transaminases increased (including alanine aminotransferase increased and alanine aminotransferase abnormal) 50 (0.8) 71 (1.2) Aspartate aminotransferase increased 47 (0.8) 69 (1.2) Gamma-glutamyltransferase increased 38 (0.6) 65 (1.1) Less common adverse reactions in apixaban-treated patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery occurring at a frequency of ≥0.1% to <1%: Blood and lymphatic system disorders: thrombocytopenia (including platelet count decreases) Vascular disorders: hypotension (including procedural hypotension) Respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal disorders: epistaxis Gastrointestinal disorders: gastrointestinal hemorrhage (including hematemesis and melena), hematochezia Hepatobiliary disorders: liver function test abnormal, blood alkaline phosphatase increased, blood bilirubin increased Renal and urinary disorders: hematuria (including respective laboratory parameters) Injury, poisoning, and procedural complications: wound secretion, incision-site hemorrhage (including incision-site hematoma), operative hemorrhage Less common adverse reactions in apixaban-treated patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery occurring at a frequency of <0.1%: Gingival bleeding, hemoptysis, hypersensitivity, muscle hemorrhage, ocular hemorrhage (including conjunctival hemorrhage), rectal hemorrhage Treatment of DVT and PE and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT or PE The safety of ELIQUIS has been evaluated in the AMPLIFY and AMPLIFY-EXT studies, including 2676 patients exposed to ELIQUIS 10 mg twice daily, 3359 patients exposed to ELIQUIS 5 mg twice daily, and 840 patients exposed to ELIQUIS 2.5 mg twice daily. Common adverse reactions (≥1%) were gingival bleeding, epistaxis, contusion, hematuria, rectal hemorrhage, hematoma, menorrhagia, and hemoptysis. AMPLIFY Study The mean duration of exposure to ELIQUIS was 154 days and to enoxaparin/warfarin was 152 days in the AMPLIFY study. Adverse reactions related to bleeding occurred in 417 (15.6%) ELIQUIS-treated patients compared to 661 (24.6%) enoxaparin/warfarin-treated patients. The discontinuation rate due to bleeding events was 0.7% in the ELIQUIS-treated patients compared to 1.7% in enoxaparin/warfarin-treated patients in the AMPLIFY study. In the AMPLIFY study, ELIQUIS was statistically superior to enoxaparin/warfarin in the primary safety endpoint of major bleeding (relative risk 0.31, 95% CI [0.17, 0.55], P-value <0.0001). Bleeding results from the AMPLIFY study are summarized in Table 5. Table 5: Bleeding Results in the AMPLIFY Study ELIQUIS N=2676 n (%) Enoxaparin/Warfarin N=2689 n (%) Relative Risk (95% CI) * CRNM = clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Events associated with each endpoint were counted once per subject, but subjects may have contributed events to multiple endpoints. Major 15 (0.6) 49 (1.8) 0.31 (0.17, 0.55) p<0.0001 CRNM* 103 (3.9) 215 (8.0) Major + CRNM 115 (4.3) 261 (9.7) Minor 313 (11.7) 505 (18.8) All 402 (15.0) 676 (25.1) Adverse reactions occurring in ≥1% of patients in the AMPLIFY study are listed in Table 6. Table 6: Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥1% of Patients Treated for DVT and PE in the AMPLIFY Study ELIQUIS N=2676 n (%) Enoxaparin/Warfarin N=2689 n (%) Epistaxis 77 (2.9) 146 (5.4) Contusion 49 (1.8) 97 (3.6) Hematuria 46 (1.7) 102 (3.8) Menorrhagia 38 (1.4) 30 (1.1) Hematoma 35 (1.3) 76 (2.8) Hemoptysis 32 (1.2) 31 (1.2) Rectal hemorrhage 26 (1.0) 39 (1.5) Gingival bleeding 26 (1.0) 50 (1.9) AMPLIFY-EXT Study The mean duration of exposure to ELIQUIS was approximately 330 days and to placebo was 312 days in the AMPLIFY-EXT study. Adverse reactions related to bleeding occurred in 219 (13.3%) ELIQUIS-treated patients compared to 72 (8.7%) placebo-treated patients. The discontinuation rate due to bleeding events was approximately 1% in the ELIQUIS-treated patients compared to 0.4% in those patients in the placebo group in the AMPLIFY-EXT study. Bleeding results from the AMPLIFY-EXT study are summarized in Table 7. Table 7: Bleeding Results in the AMPLIFY-EXT Study ELIQUIS 2.5 mg bid N=840 n (%) ELIQUIS 5 mg bid N=811 n (%) Placebo N=826 n (%) * CRNM = clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Events associated with each endpoint were counted once per subject, but subjects may have contributed events to multiple endpoints. Major 2 (0.2) 1 (0.1) 4 (0.5) CRNM* 25 (3.0) 34 (4.2) 19 (2.3) Major + CRNM 27 (3.2) 35 (4.3) 22 (2.7) Minor 75 (8.9) 98 (12.1) 58 (7.0) All 94 (11.2) 121 (14.9) 74 (9.0) Adverse reactions occurring in ≥1% of patients in the AMPLIFY-EXT study are listed in Table 8. Table 8: Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥1% of Patients Undergoing Extended Treatment for DVT and PE in the AMPLIFY-EXT Study ELIQUIS 2.5 mg bid N=840 n (%) ELIQUIS 5 mg bid N=811 n (%) Placebo N=826 n (%) Epistaxis 13 (1.5) 29 (3.6) 9 (1.1) Hematuria 12 (1.4) 17 (2.1) 9 (1.1) Hematoma 13 (1.5) 16 (2.0) 10 (1.2) Contusion 18 (2.1) 18 (2.2) 18 (2.2) Gingival bleeding 12 (1.4) 9 (1.1) 3 (0.4) Other Adverse Reactions Less common adverse reactions in ELIQUIS-treated patients in the AMPLIFY or AMPLIFY-EXT studies occurring at a frequency of ≥0.1% to <1%: Blood and lymphatic system disorders: hemorrhagic anemia Gastrointestinal disorders: hematochezia, hemorrhoidal hemorrhage, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hematemesis, melena, anal hemorrhage Injury, poisoning, and procedural complications: wound hemorrhage, postprocedural hemorrhage, traumatic hematoma, periorbital hematoma Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: muscle hemorrhage Reproductive system and breast disorders: vaginal hemorrhage, metrorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, genital hemorrhage Vascular disorders: hemorrhage Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: ecchymosis, skin hemorrhage, petechiae Eye disorders: conjunctival hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhage, eye hemorrhage Investigations: blood urine present, occult blood positive, occult blood, red blood cells urine positive General disorders and administration-site conditions: injection-site hematoma, vessel puncture-site hematoma

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION •Reduction of risk of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: •The recommended dose is 5 mg orally twice daily. (2.1) •In patients with at least 2 of the following characteristics: age ≥80 years, body weight ≤60 kg, or serum creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dL, the recommended dose is 2.5 mg orally twice daily. (2.1) •Prophylaxis of DVT following hip or knee replacement surgery: •The recommended dose is 2.5 mg orally twice daily. (2.1) •Treatment of DVT and PE: •The recommended dose is 10 mg taken orally twice daily for 7 days, followed by 5 mg taken orally twice daily. (2.1) •Reduction in the risk of recurrent DVT and PE following initial therapy: •The recommended dose is 2.5 mg taken orally twice daily. (2.1) 2.1 Recommended Dose Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation The recommended dose of ELIQUIS for most patients is 5 mg taken orally twice daily. The recommended dose of ELIQUIS is 2.5 mg twice daily in patients with at least two of the following characteristics: •age ≥80 years •body weight ≤60 kg •serum creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dL Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis Following Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery The recommended dose of ELIQUIS is 2.5 mg taken orally twice daily. The initial dose should be taken 12 to 24 hours after surgery. •In patients undergoing hip replacement surgery, the recommended duration of treatment is 35 days. •In patients undergoing knee replacement surgery, the recommended duration of treatment is 12 days. Treatment of DVT and PE The recommended dose of ELIQUIS is 10 mg taken orally twice daily for the first 7 days of therapy. After 7 days, the recommended dose is 5 mg taken orally twice daily. Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT and PE The recommended dose of ELIQUIS is 2.5 mg taken orally twice daily after at least 6 months of treatment for DVT or PE [see Clinical Studies (14.3)]. 2.2 Missed Dose If a dose of ELIQUIS is not taken at the scheduled time, the dose should be taken as soon as possible on the same day and twice-daily administration should be resumed. The dose should not be doubled to make up for a missed dose. 2.3 Temporary Interruption for Surgery and Other Interventions ELIQUIS should be discontinued at least 48 hours prior to elective surgery or invasive procedures with a moderate or high risk of unacceptable or clinically significant bleeding. ELIQUIS should be discontinued at least 24 hours prior to elective surgery or invasive procedures with a low risk of bleeding or where the bleeding would be non-critical in location and easily controlled. Bridging anticoagulation during the 24 to 48 hours after stopping ELIQUIS and prior to the intervention is not generally required. ELIQUIS should be restarted after the surgical or other procedures as soon as adequate hemostasis has been established. 2.4 Converting from or to ELIQUIS Switching from warfarin to ELIQUIS: Warfarin should be discontinued and ELIQUIS started when the international normalized ratio (INR) is below 2.0. Switching from ELIQUIS to warfarin: ELIQUIS affects INR, so that initial INR measurements during the transition to warfarin may not be useful for determining the appropriate dose of warfarin. One approach is to discontinue ELIQUIS and begin both a parenteral anticoagulant and warfarin at the time the next dose of ELIQUIS would have been taken, discontinuing the parenteral anticoagulant when INR reaches an acceptable range. Switching from ELIQUIS to anticoagulants other than warfarin (oral or parenteral): Discontinue ELIQUIS and begin taking the new anticoagulant other than warfarin at the usual time of the next dose of ELIQUIS. Switching from anticoagulants other than warfarin (oral or parenteral) to ELIQUIS: Discontinue the anticoagulant other than warfarin and begin taking ELIQUIS at the usual time of the next dose of the anticoagulant other than warfarin. 2.5 Strong Dual Inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein For patients receiving ELIQUIS doses of 5 mg or 10 mg twice daily, reduce the dose by 50% when ELIQUIS is coadministered with drugs that are strong dual inhibitors of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (e.g., ketoconazole, itraconazole, ritonavir, clarithromycin) [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. In patients already taking 2.5 mg twice daily, avoid coadministration of ELIQUIS with strong dual inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-gp [see Drug Interactions (7.1)]. 2.6 Administration Options For patients who are unable to swallow whole tablets, 5 mg and 2.5 mg ELIQUIS tablets may be crushed and suspended in water, 5% dextrose in water (D5W), or apple juice, or mixed with applesauce and promptly administered orally [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] . Alternatively, ELIQUIS tablets may be crushed and suspended in 60 mL of water or D5W and promptly delivered through a nasogastric tube [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) ] . Crushed ELIQUIS tablets are stable in water, D5W, apple juice, and applesauce for up to 4 hours.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS • Pregnancy: Not recommended. (8.1) • Nursing Mothers: Discontinue drug or discontinue nursing. (8.3) • Severe Hepatic Impairment: Not recommended. (8.7, 12.2) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category B There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of ELIQUIS in pregnant women. Treatment is likely to increase the risk of hemorrhage during pregnancy and delivery. ELIQUIS should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit outweighs the potential risk to the mother and fetus. Treatment of pregnant rats, rabbits, and mice after implantation until the end of gestation resulted in fetal exposure to apixaban, but was not associated with increased risk for fetal malformations or toxicity. No maternal or fetal deaths were attributed to bleeding. Increased incidence of maternal bleeding was observed in mice, rats, and rabbits at maternal exposures that were 19, 4, and 1 times, respectively, the human exposure of unbound drug, based on area under plasma-concentration time curve (AUC) comparisons at the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 10 mg (5 mg twice daily). 8.2 Labor and Delivery Safety and effectiveness of ELIQUIS during labor and delivery have not been studied in clinical trials. Consider the risks of bleeding and of stroke in using ELIQUIS in this setting [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Treatment of pregnant rats from implantation (gestation Day 7) to weaning (lactation Day 21) with apixaban at a dose of 1000 mg/kg (about 5 times the human exposure based on unbound apixaban) did not result in death of offspring or death of mother rats during labor in association with uterine bleeding. However, increased incidence of maternal bleeding, primarily during gestation, occurred at apixaban doses of ≥25 mg/kg, a dose corresponding to ≥1.3 times the human exposure. 8.3 Nursing Mothers It is unknown whether apixaban or its metabolites are excreted in human milk. Rats excrete apixaban in milk (12% of the maternal dose). Women should be instructed either to discontinue breastfeeding or to discontinue ELIQUIS therapy, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established. 8.5 Geriatric Use Of the total subjects in the ARISTOTLE and AVERROES clinical studies, >69% were 65 and older, and >31% were 75 and older. In the ADVANCE-1, ADVANCE-2, and ADVANCE-3 clinical studies, 50% of subjects were 65 and older, while 16% were 75 and older. In the AMPLIFY and AMPLIFY-EXT clinical studies, >32% of subjects were 65 and older and >13% were 75 and older. No clinically significant differences in safety or effectiveness were observed when comparing subjects in different age groups. 8.6 Renal Impairment Reduction of Risk of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation The recommended dose is 2.5 mg twice daily in patients with at least two of the following characteristics [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)]: •age ≥80 years •body weight ≤60 kg •serum creatinine ≥1.5 mg/dL Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease on Dialysis Clinical efficacy and safety studies with ELIQUIS did not enroll patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis. In patients with ESRD maintained on intermittent hemodialysis, administration of ELIQUIS at the usually recommended dose [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)] will result in concentrations of apixaban and pharmacodynamic activity similar to those observed in the ARISTOTLE study [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. It is not known whether these concentrations will lead to similar stroke reduction and bleeding risk in patients with ESRD on dialysis as was seen in ARISTOTLE. Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis Following Hip or Knee Replacement Surgery, and Treatment of DVT and PE and Reduction in the Risk of Recurrence of DVT and PE No dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment, including those with ESRD on dialysis [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)]. Clinical efficacy and safety studies with ELIQUIS did not enroll patients with ESRD on dialysis or patients with a CrCl <15 mL/min; therefore, dosing recommendations are based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (anti-FXa activity) data in subjects with ESRD maintained on dialysis [see Clinical Pharmacology 12.3)]. 8.7 Hepatic Impairment No dose adjustment is required in patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class A). Because patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class B) may have intrinsic coagulation abnormalities and there is limited clinical experience with ELIQUIS in these patients, dosing recommendations cannot be provided [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)]. ELIQUIS is not recommended in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class C) [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)].
Pregnancy and lactation
8.3 Nursing Mothers It is unknown whether apixaban or its metabolites are excreted in human milk. Rats excrete apixaban in milk (12% of the maternal dose). Women should be instructed either to discontinue breastfeeding or to discontinue ELIQUIS therapy, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Apixaban is a substrate of both CYP3A4 and P-gp. Inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-gp increase exposure to apixaban and increase the risk of bleeding. Inducers of CYP3A4 and P-gp decrease exposure to apixaban and increase the risk of stroke and other thromboembolic events. •Strong dual inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-gp increase blood levels of apixaban. Reduce ELIQUIS dose or avoid coadministration. (2.5, 7.1, 12.3) •Simultaneous use of strong dual inducers of CYP3A4 and P-gp reduces blood levels of apixaban: Avoid concomitant use. (7.2, 12.3) 7.1 Strong Dual Inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-gp For patients receiving ELIQUIS 5 mg or 10 mg twice daily, the dose of ELIQUIS should be decreased by 50% when coadministered with drugs that are strong dual inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-gp (e.g., ketoconazole, itraconazole, ritonavir, or clarithromycin) [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. For patients receiving ELIQUIS at a dose of 2.5 mg twice daily, avoid coadministration with strong dual inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-gp [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.2 Strong Dual Inducers of CYP3A4 and P-gp Avoid concomitant use of ELIQUIS with strong dual inducers of CYP3A4 and P-gp (e.g., rifampin, carbamazepine, phenytoin, St. John’s wort) because such drugs will decrease exposure to apixaban [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.3 Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents Coadministration of antiplatelet agents, fibrinolytics, heparin, aspirin, and chronic NSAID use increases the risk of bleeding. APPRAISE-2, a placebo-controlled clinical trial of apixaban in high-risk, post-acute coronary syndrome patients treated with aspirin or the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel, was terminated early due to a higher rate of bleeding with apixaban compared to placebo. The rate of ISTH major bleeding was 2.8% per year with apixaban versus 0.6% per year with placebo in patients receiving single antiplatelet therapy and was 5.9% per year with apixaban versus 2.5% per year with placebo in those receiving dual antiplatelet therapy. In ARISTOTLE, concomitant use of aspirin increased the bleeding risk on ELIQUIS from 1.8% per year to 3.4% per year and concomitant use of aspirin and warfarin increased the bleeding risk from 2.7% per year to 4.6% per year. In this clinical trial, there was limited (2.3%) use of dual antiplatelet therapy with ELIQUIS.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA202155
Agency product number 3Z9Y7UWC1J
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 55154-0612,55154-0613
Date Last Revised 10-10-2017
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
Storage and handling Storage and Handling Store at 20°C to 25°C (68°F-77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C and 30°C (59°F-86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].
Marketing authorisation holder Cardinal Health
Warnings WARNING: (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF ELIQUIS INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF ELIQUIS INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including ELIQUIS, increases the risk of thrombotic events. If anticoagulation with ELIQUIS is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy, consider coverage with another anticoagulant [see Dosage and Administration (2.4), Warnings and Precautions (5.1), and Clinical Studies (14.1)]. (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA Epidural or spinal hematomas may occur in patients treated with ELIQUIS who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. These hematomas may result in long-term or permanent paralysis. Consider these risks when scheduling patients for spinal procedures. Factors that can increase the risk of developing epidural or spinal hematomas in these patients include: • use of indwelling epidural catheters • concomitant use of other drugs that affect hemostasis, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), platelet inhibitors, other anticoagulants • a history of traumatic or repeated epidural or spinal punctures • a history of spinal deformity or spinal surgery • optimal timing between the administration of ELIQUIS and neuraxial procedures is not known [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] Monitor patients frequently for signs and symptoms of neurological impairment. If neurological compromise is noted, urgent treatment is necessary [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. Consider the benefits and risks before neuraxial intervention in patients anticoagulated or to be anticoagulated [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. WARNING: (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF ELIQUIS INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. (A) PREMATURE DISCONTINUATION OF ELIQUIS INCREASES THE RISK OF THROMBOTIC EVENTS: Premature discontinuation of any oral anticoagulant, including ELIQUIS, increases the risk of thrombotic events. To reduce this risk, consider coverage with another anticoagulant if ELIQUIS is discontinued for a reason other than pathological bleeding or completion of a course of therapy. (2.4, 5.1, 14.1) (B) SPINAL/EPIDURAL HEMATOMA: Epidural or spinal hematomas may occur in patients treated with ELIQUIS who are receiving neuraxial anesthesia or undergoing spinal puncture. These hematomas may result in long-term or permanent paralysis. Consider these risks when scheduling patients for spinal procedures. (5.3)