Data from FDA - Curated by Marshall Pearce - Last updated 06 November 2017

Indication(s)

INDICATIONS AND USAGE Dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release capsules are indicated in: Narcolepsy Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity As an integral part of a total treatment program that typically includes other measures (psychological, educational, social) for patients (ages 6 years to 16 years) with this syndrome. A diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; DSM-IV) implies the presence of the hyperactive-impulsive or inattentive symptoms that caused impairment and were present before age 7 years. The symptoms must cause clinically significant impairment, e.g., in social, academic, or occupational functioning, and be present in 2 or more settings, e.g., school (or work) and at home. The symptoms must not be better accounted for by another mental disorder. For the Inattentive Type, at least 6 of the following symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months: lack of attention to details/careless mistakes; lack of sustained attention; poor listener; failure to follow through on tasks; poor organization; avoids tasks requiring sustained mental effort; loses things; easily distracted; forgetful. For the Hyperactive-Impulsive Type, at least 6 of the following symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months: fidgeting/squirming; leaving seat; inappropriate running/climbing; difficulty with quiet activities; “on the go”; excessive talking; blurting answers; can’t wait turn; intrusive. The Combined Type requires both inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive criteria to be met. Special Diagnostic Considerations Specific etiology of this syndrome is unknown, and there is no single diagnostic test. Adequate diagnosis requires the use of medical and special psychological, educational, and social resources. Learning may or may not be impaired. The diagnosis must be based upon a complete history and evaluation of the patient and not solely on the presences of the required number of DSM-IV characteristics. Need for Comprehensive Treatment Program Dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release is indicated as an integral part of a total treatment program for ADHD that may include other measures (psychological, educational, social) for patients with this syndrome. Drug treatment may not be indicated for all patients with this syndrome. Stimulants are not intended for use in patients who exhibit symptoms secondary to environmental factors and/or other primary psychiatric disorders, including psychosis. Appropriate educational placement is essential and psychosocial intervention is often helpful. When remedial measures alone are insufficient, the decision to prescribe stimulant medication will depend upon the physician’s assessment of the chronicity and severity of the patient’s symptoms.

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Advisory information

contraindications
CONTRAINDICATIONS Advanced arteriosclerosis, symptomatic cardiovascular disease, moderate to severe hypertension, hyperthyroidism, known hypersensitivity or idiosyncrasy to the sympathomimetic amines, glaucoma. Agitated states. Patients with a history of drug abuse. Known hypersensitivity or idiosyncrasy to amphetamine. In patients known to be hypersensitive to amphetamine, or other components of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release. Hypersensitivity reactions such as angioedema and anaphylactic reactions have been reported in patients treated with other amphetamine products [see Adverse Reactions] Patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or within 14 days of stopping MAOIs (including MAOIs such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue), because of an increased risk of hypertensive crisis [see Warnings and Drug Interactions].
Special warnings and precautions
PRECAUTIONS General The least amount feasible should be prescribed or dispensed at 1 time in order to minimize the possibility of overdosage. Information for Patients Amphetamines may impair the ability of the patient to engage in potentially hazardous activities such as operating machinery or vehicles; the patient should therefore be cautioned accordingly. Prescribers or other health professionals should inform patients, their families, and their caregivers about the benefits and risks associated with treatment with dextroamphetamine and should counsel them in its appropriate use. A patient Medication Guide is available for dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release. The prescriber or health professional should instruct patients, their families, and their caregivers to read the Medication Guide and should assist them in understanding its contents. Patients should be given the opportunity to discuss the contents of the Medication Guide and to obtain answers to any questions they may have. The complete text of the Medication Guide is reprinted at the end of this document. Circulation problems in fingers and toes [Peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon] Instruct patients beginning treatment with dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release about the risk of peripheral vasculopathy, including Raynaud’s phenomenon, and associated signs and symptoms: fingers or toes may feel numb, cool, painful, and/or may change color from pale, to blue, to red. Instruct patients to report to their physician any new numbness, pain, skin color change, or sensitivity to temperature in fingers or toes. ​Instruct patients to call their physician immediately with any signs of unexplained wounds appearing on fingers or toes while taking dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release. Further clinical evaluation (e.g., rheumatology referral) may be appropriate for certain patients. Drug Interactions Acidifying Agents Lower blood levels and efficacy of amphetamines. Increase dose based on clinical response. Examples of acidifying agents include gastrointestinal acidifying agents (e.g., guanethidine, reserpine, glutamic acid HCl, ascorbic acid) and urinary acidifying agents (e.g., ammonium chloride, sodium acid phosphate, methenamine salts). Adrenergic Blockers Adrenergic blockers are inhibited by amphetamines. Alkalinizing Agents Increase blood levels and potentiate the action of amphetamine. Coadministration of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and gastrointestinal alkalinizing agents should be avoided. Examples of alkalinizing agents include gastrointestinal alkalinizing agents (e.g., sodium bicarbonate) and urinary alkalinizing agents (e.g. acetazolamide, some thiazides). Tricyclic Antidepressants May enhance the activity of tricyclic or sympathomimetic agents causing striking and sustained increases in the concentration of d- amphetamine in the brain; cardiovascular effects can be potentiated. Monitor frequently and adjust or use alternative therapy based on clinical response. Examples of tricyclic antidepressants include desipramine, Protriptyline. CYP2D6 Inhibitors The concomitant use of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and CYP2D6 inhibitors may increase the exposure of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release compared to the use of the drug alone and increase the risk of serotonin syndrome. Initiate with lower doses and monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome particularly during dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release initiation and after a dosage increase. If serotonin syndrome occurs, discontinue dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and the CYP2D6 inhibitor [see Warnings, Overdosage]. Examples of CYP2D6 Inhibitors include paroxetine and fluoxetine (also serotonergic drugs), quinidine, ritonavir. Serotonergic Drugs The concomitant use of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and serotonergic drugs increases the risk of serotonin syndrome. Initiate with lower doses and monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome, particularly during dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release initiation or dosage increase. If serotonin syndrome occurs, discontinue dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and the concomitant serotonergic drug(s) [see Warnings and Precautions]. Examples of serotonergic drugs include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, St. John’s Wort. MAO Inhibitors Concomitant use of MAOIs and CNS stimulants can cause hypertensive crisis. Potential outcomes include death, stroke, myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, ophthalmological complications, eclampsia, pulmonary edema, and renal failure. Do not administer dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release concomitantly or within 14 days after discontinuing MAOI [see Contraindications and Warnings]. Examples of MAOIs include selegiline, tranylcypromine, isocarboxazid, phenelzine, linezolid, methylene blue. Proton Pump Inhibitors Time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of amphetamine is decreased compared to when administered alone. Monitor patients for changes in clinical effect and adjust therapy based on clinical response. An example of a proton pump inhibitor is omeprazole. Antihistamines Amphetamines may counteract the sedative effect of antihistamines. Antihypertensives Amphetamines may antagonize the hypotensive effects of antihypertensives. Chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine blocks dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake, thus inhibiting the central stimulant effects of amphetamines, and can be used to treat amphetamine poisoning. Ethosuximide Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of ethosuximide. Haloperidol Haloperidol blocks dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake, thus inhibiting the central stimulant effects of amphetamines. Lithium Carbonate The stimulatory effects of amphetamines may be inhibited by lithium carbonate. Meperidine Amphetamines potentiate the analgesic effect of meperidine. Methenamine Therapy Urinary excretion of amphetamines is increased, and efficacy is reduced, by acidifying agents used in methenamine therapy. Norepinephrine Amphetamines enhance the adrenergic effect of norepinephrine. Phenobarbital Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of phenobarbital; coadministration of phenobarbital may produce a synergistic anticonvulsant action. Phenytoin Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of phenytoin; coadministration of phenytoin may produce a synergistic anticonvulsant action. Propoxyphene In cases of propoxyphene overdosage, amphetamine CNS stimulation is potentiated and fatal convulsions can occur. Veratrum Alkaloids Amphetamines inhibit the hypotensive effect of veratrum alkaloids. Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions Amphetamines can cause a significant elevation in plasma corticosteroid levels. This increase is greatest in the evening. Amphetamines may interfere with urinary steroid determinations. Carcinogenesis/Mutagenesis Mutagenicity studies and long-term studies in animals to determine the carcinogenic potential of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release have not been performed. Pregnancy Teratogenic Effects Pregnancy Category C. Dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release has been shown to have embryotoxic and teratogenic effects when administered to A/Jax mice and C57BL mice in doses approximately 41 times the maximum human dose. Embryotoxic effects were not seen in New Zealand white rabbits given the drug in doses 7 times the human dose nor in rats given 12.5 times the maximum human dose. While there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women, there has been 1 report of severe congenital bony deformity, tracheoesophageal fistula, and anal atresia (VATER association) in a baby born to a woman who took dextroamphetamine sulfate with lovastatin during the first trimester of pregnancy. Dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Nonteratogenic Effects Infants born to mothers dependent on amphetamines have an increased risk of premature delivery and low birth weight. Also, these infants may experience symptoms of withdrawal as demonstrated by dysphoria, including agitation, and significant lassitude. Nursing Mothers Amphetamines are excreted in human milk. Mothers taking amphetamines should be advised to refrain from nursing. Pediatric Use Long-term effects of amphetamines in pediatric patients have not been well established. Dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release is not recommended for use in pediatric patients younger than 6 years of age with Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity described under INDICATIONS AND USAGE. Clinical experience suggests that in psychotic children, administration of amphetamines may exacerbate symptoms of behavior disturbance and thought disorder. Amphetamines have been reported to exacerbate motor and phonic tics and Tourette’s syndrome. Therefore, clinical evaluation for tics and Tourette’s syndrome in children and their families should precede use of stimulant medications. Data are inadequate to determine whether chronic administration of amphetamines may be associated with growth inhibition; therefore, growth should be monitored during treatment. Drug treatment is not indicated in all cases of Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity and should be considered only in light of the complete history and evaluation of the child. The decision to prescribe amphetamines should depend on the physician’s assessment of the chronicity and severity of the child’s symptoms and their appropriateness for his or her age. Prescription should not depend solely on the presence of one or more of the behavioral characteristics. When these symptoms are associated with acute stress reactions, treatment with amphetamines is usually not indicated.
Adverse reactions
ADVERSE REACTIONS Cardiovascular Palpitations, tachycardia, elevation of blood pressure. There have been isolated reports of cardiomyopathy associated with chronic amphetamine use. Central Nervous System Psychotic episodes at recommended doses (rare), overstimulation, restlessness, dizziness, insomnia, euphoria, dyskinesia, dysphoria, tremor, headache, exacerbation of motor and phonic tics, and Tourette’s syndrome. Gastrointestinal Dryness of the mouth, unpleasant taste, diarrhea, constipation, other gastrointestinal disturbances. Anorexia and weight loss may occur as undesirable effects. Allergic Urticaria. Endocrine Impotence, changes in libido, frequent or prolonged erections. Musculoskeletal Rhabdomyolysis. Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders Alopecia. To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE EVENTS, contact Actavis at 1-800-432-8534 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or http://www.fda.gov/ for voluntary reporting of adverse reactions.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Amphetamines should be administered at the lowest effective dosage and dosage should be individually adjusted. Late evening doses should be avoided because of the resulting insomnia. Narcolepsy Usual dose is 5 mg to 60 mg per day in divided doses, depending on the individual patient response. Narcolepsy seldom occurs in children under 12 years of age; however, when it does, dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release may be used. The suggested initial dose for patients aged 6 to 12 is 5 mg daily; daily dose may be raised in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals until an optimal response is obtained. In patients 12 years of age and older, start with 10 mg daily; daily dosage may be raised in increments of 10 mg at weekly intervals until an optimal response is obtained. If bothersome adverse reactions appear (e.g., insomnia or anorexia), dosage should be reduced. Extended-release capsules may be used for once-a-day dosage wherever appropriate. Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity The extended-release capsule formulation is not recommended for pediatric patients younger than 6 years of age. In pediatric patients 6 years of age and older, start with 5 mg once or twice daily; daily dosage may be raised in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals until optimal response is obtained. Only in rare cases will it be necessary to exceed a total of 40 mg per day. Extended-release capsules may be used for once-a-day dosage wherever appropriate. Where possible, drug administration should be interrupted occasionally to determine if there is a recurrence of behavioral symptoms sufficient to require continued therapy.
Pregnancy and lactation
Nursing Mothers Amphetamines are excreted in human milk. Mothers taking amphetamines should be advised to refrain from nursing.

Interactions

Drug Interactions Acidifying Agents Lower blood levels and efficacy of amphetamines. Increase dose based on clinical response. Examples of acidifying agents include gastrointestinal acidifying agents (e.g., guanethidine, reserpine, glutamic acid HCl, ascorbic acid) and urinary acidifying agents (e.g., ammonium chloride, sodium acid phosphate, methenamine salts). Adrenergic Blockers Adrenergic blockers are inhibited by amphetamines. Alkalinizing Agents Increase blood levels and potentiate the action of amphetamine. Coadministration of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and gastrointestinal alkalinizing agents should be avoided. Examples of alkalinizing agents include gastrointestinal alkalinizing agents (e.g., sodium bicarbonate) and urinary alkalinizing agents (e.g. acetazolamide, some thiazides). Tricyclic Antidepressants May enhance the activity of tricyclic or sympathomimetic agents causing striking and sustained increases in the concentration of d- amphetamine in the brain; cardiovascular effects can be potentiated. Monitor frequently and adjust or use alternative therapy based on clinical response. Examples of tricyclic antidepressants include desipramine, Protriptyline. CYP2D6 Inhibitors The concomitant use of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and CYP2D6 inhibitors may increase the exposure of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release compared to the use of the drug alone and increase the risk of serotonin syndrome. Initiate with lower doses and monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome particularly during dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release initiation and after a dosage increase. If serotonin syndrome occurs, discontinue dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and the CYP2D6 inhibitor [see Warnings, Overdosage]. Examples of CYP2D6 Inhibitors include paroxetine and fluoxetine (also serotonergic drugs), quinidine, ritonavir. Serotonergic Drugs The concomitant use of dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and serotonergic drugs increases the risk of serotonin syndrome. Initiate with lower doses and monitor patients for signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome, particularly during dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release initiation or dosage increase. If serotonin syndrome occurs, discontinue dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release and the concomitant serotonergic drug(s) [see Warnings and Precautions]. Examples of serotonergic drugs include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, St. John’s Wort. MAO Inhibitors Concomitant use of MAOIs and CNS stimulants can cause hypertensive crisis. Potential outcomes include death, stroke, myocardial infarction, aortic dissection, ophthalmological complications, eclampsia, pulmonary edema, and renal failure. Do not administer dextroamphetamine sulfate extended-release concomitantly or within 14 days after discontinuing MAOI [see Contraindications and Warnings]. Examples of MAOIs include selegiline, tranylcypromine, isocarboxazid, phenelzine, linezolid, methylene blue. Proton Pump Inhibitors Time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of amphetamine is decreased compared to when administered alone. Monitor patients for changes in clinical effect and adjust therapy based on clinical response. An example of a proton pump inhibitor is omeprazole. Antihistamines Amphetamines may counteract the sedative effect of antihistamines. Antihypertensives Amphetamines may antagonize the hypotensive effects of antihypertensives. Chlorpromazine Chlorpromazine blocks dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake, thus inhibiting the central stimulant effects of amphetamines, and can be used to treat amphetamine poisoning. Ethosuximide Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of ethosuximide. Haloperidol Haloperidol blocks dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake, thus inhibiting the central stimulant effects of amphetamines. Lithium Carbonate The stimulatory effects of amphetamines may be inhibited by lithium carbonate. Meperidine Amphetamines potentiate the analgesic effect of meperidine. Methenamine Therapy Urinary excretion of amphetamines is increased, and efficacy is reduced, by acidifying agents used in methenamine therapy. Norepinephrine Amphetamines enhance the adrenergic effect of norepinephrine. Phenobarbital Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of phenobarbital; coadministration of phenobarbital may produce a synergistic anticonvulsant action. Phenytoin Amphetamines may delay intestinal absorption of phenytoin; coadministration of phenytoin may produce a synergistic anticonvulsant action. Propoxyphene In cases of propoxyphene overdosage, amphetamine CNS stimulation is potentiated and fatal convulsions can occur. Veratrum Alkaloids Amphetamines inhibit the hypotensive effect of veratrum alkaloids.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number ANDA203901
Agency product number JJ768O327N
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 45963-304,45963-305,45963-303
Date Last Revised 29-09-2017
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
Marketing authorisation holder Actavis Pharma, Inc.
Warnings Warning Amphetamines Have A High Potential For Abuse. Administration Of Amphetamines For Prolonged Periods Of Time May Lead To Drug Dependence And Must Be Avoided. Particular Attention Should Be Paid To The Possibility Of Subjects Obtaining Amphetamines For Non-Therapeutic Use Or Distribution To Others, And The Drugs Should Be Prescribed Or Dispensed Sparingly. Misuse Of Amphetamines May Cause Sudden Death And Serious Cardiovascular Adverse Events.