Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 15 June 2018

Indication(s)

INDICATIONS AND USAGE For relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses, particularly dry, scaling localized lesions.

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Advisory information

contraindications
CONTRAINDICATIONS Topical corticosteroids are contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity to any of the components of these preparations. Use of Cordran Tape is not recommended for lesions exuding serum or in intertriginous areas.
Special warnings and precautions
PRECAUTIONS General - Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria in some patients. Conditions that augment systemic absorption include application of the more potent steroids, use over large surface areas, prolonged use, and the addition of occlusive dressings. Therefore, patients receiving a large dose of a potent topical steroid applied to a large surface area or under an occlusive dressing should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression by using urinary-free cortisol and ACTH stimulation tests. If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent steroid. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt and complete on discontinuation of the drug. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of steroid withdrawal may occur, so that supplemental systemic corticosteroids are required. Pediatric patients may absorb proportionately larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus be more susceptible to systemic toxicity (see Pediatric Use under PRECAUTIONS ). If irritation develops, topical corticosteroids should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. In the presence of dermatologic infections, the use of an appropriate antifungal or antibacterial agent should be instituted. If a favorable response does not occur promptly, Cordran should be discontinued until the infection has been adequately controlled. Information for the Patient - Patients using topical corticosteroids should receive the following information and instructions: This medication is to be used as directed by the physician. It is for external use only. Avoid contact with the eyes. Patients should be advised not to use this medication for any disorder other than that for which it was prescribed. The treated skin area should not be bandaged or otherwise covered or wrapped in order to be occlusive unless the patient is directed to do so by the physician. Patients should report any signs of local adverse reactions, especially under occlusive dressing. Parents of pediatric patients should be advised not to use tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants on a patient being treated in the diaper area, because these garments may constitute occlusive dressings. Laboratory Tests - The following tests may be helpful in evaluating the HPA axis suppression: Urinary-free cortisol test ACTH stimulation test Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, and Impairment of Fertility - Long-term animal studies have not been performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential or the effect on fertility of topical corticosteroids. Studies to determine mutagenicity with prednisolone and hydrocortisone have revealed negative results. Usage in Pregnancy - Corticosteroids are generally teratogenic in laboratory animals when administered systemically at relatively low dosage levels. The more potent corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after dermal application in laboratory animals. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women on teratogenic effects from topically applied corticosteroids. Therefore, topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Drugs of this class should not be used extensively for pregnant patients or in large amounts or for prolonged periods of time. Nursing Mothers - It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in breast milk. Systemically administered corticosteroids are secreted into breast milk in quantities not likely to have a deleterious effect on the infant. Nevertheless, caution should be exercised when topical corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman. Pediatric Use - Pediatric patients may demonstrate greater susceptibility to topical-corticosteroid-induced HPA axis suppression and Cushing’s syndrome than do mature patients because of a larger skin surface area to body weight ratio. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, Cushing’s syndrome, and intracranial hypertension have been reported in pediatric patients receiving topical corticosteroids. Manifestations of adrenal suppression in pediatric patients include linear growth retardation, delayed weight gain, low plasma-cortisol levels, and absence of response to ACTH stimulation. Manifestations of intracranial hypertension include bulging fontanelles, headaches, and bilateral papilledema. Administration of topical corticosteroids to pediatric patients should be limited to the least amount compatible with an effective therapeutic regimen. Chronic corticosteroid therapy may interfere with the growth and development of pediatric patients.
Adverse reactions
ADVERSE REACTIONS The following local adverse reactions are reported infrequently with topical corticosteroids but may occur more frequently with the use of occlusive dressings. These reactions are listed in an approximate decreasing order of occurrence: burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis. The following may occur more frequently with occlusive dressings: maceration of the skin, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae, miliaria.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Occlusive dressings may be used for the management of psoriasis or recalcitrant conditions. If an infection develops, the use of Cordran Tape and other occlusive dressings should be discontinued and appropriate antimicrobial therapy instituted. Replacement of the tape every 12 hours produces the lowest incidence of adverse reactions, but it may be left in place for 24 hours if it is well tolerated and adheres satisfactorily. When necessary, the tape may be used at night only and removed during the day. If ends of the tape loosen prematurely, they may be trimmed off and replaced with fresh tape. The directions given below are included for the patient to follow unless otherwise instructed by the physician. ________________________________________________________________________ APPLICATION OF CORDRAN TAPE IMPORTANT: Skin should be clean and dry before tape is applied. Tape should always be cut, never torn. DIRECTIONS FOR USE: Prepare skin as directed by your physician or as follows: Gently clean the area to be covered to remove scales, crusts, dried exudates, and any previously used ointments or creams. A germicidal soap or cleanser should be used to prevent the development of odor under the tape. Shave or clip the hair in the treatment area to allow both good contact with the skin and comfortable removal. If shower or tub bath is to be taken, it should be completed before the tape is applied. The skin should be dry before application of the tape. Remove tape from flip-top vial and cut a piece slightly larger than area to be covered. Round off corners. Return remainder of tape roll to vial and tightly close the lid. Pull white paper from transparent tape. Be careful that tape does not stick to itself. Apply tape, keeping skin smooth; press tape into place. Keep Cordran Tape in the original container. Do not repackage. Protect from moisture. Keep vial tightly closed in a dry place. REPLACEMENT OF TAPE: Unless instructed otherwise by your physician, replace tape after 12 hours. Cleanse skin and allow it to dry for 1 hour before applying new tape. IF IRRITATION OR INFECTION DEVELOPS, REMOVE TAPE AND CONSULT PHYSICIAN. ________________________________________________________________________
Pregnancy and lactation
Nursing Mothers - It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in breast milk. Systemically administered corticosteroids are secreted into breast milk in quantities not likely to have a deleterious effect on the infant. Nevertheless, caution should be exercised when topical corticosteroids are administered to a nursing woman.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA016455
Agency product number 8EUL29XUQT
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 0023-5870
Date Last Revised 04-06-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 797697
Marketing authorisation holder Allergan, Inc.