Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 31 August 2017

Indication(s)

INDICATIONS AND USAGE Copper 0.4 mg/mL (Cupric Chloride Injection, USP) is indicated for use as a supplement to intravenous solutions given for total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Administration helps to maintain copper serum levels and to prevent depletion of endogenous stores and subsequent deficiency symptoms.

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Advisory information

contraindications
CONTRAINDICATIONS None known.
Special warnings and precautions
PRECAUTIONS General Do not use unless the solution is clear and the seal is intact. Administration of zinc in the absence of copper may cause a decrease in serum copper levels. Copper 0.4 mg/mL (Cupric Chloride Injection, USP) should only be used in conjunction with a pharmacy directed admixture program using aseptic technique in a laminar flow environment; it should be used promptly and in a single operation without any repeated penetrations. Solution contains no preservatives; discard unused portion immediately after admixture procedure is completed. It is not recommended to administer copper to a patient with Wilson’s Disease, a genetic disease of copper metabolism. Drug Interactions Cupric ion may degrade ascorbic acid in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions. In order to avoid this loss of ascorbate, multivitamin additives should be added to TPN solutions immediately prior to infusion. Alternatively, the multivitamin additive may be added to one container of TPN solution, followed by copper in a subsequent container. Laboratory Tests Twice monthly serum assays for copper and/or ceruloplasmin are suggested for monitoring copper concentrations in long-term TPN patients. As ceruloplasmin is a cuproenzyme, ceruloplasmin assays may be depressed secondary to copper deficiency. Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, and Impairment of Fertility Long-term animal studies to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of Copper 0.4 mg/mL (Cupric Chloride Injection, USP) have not been performed, nor have studies been done to assess mutagenesis or impairment of fertility. Nursing Mothers It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when Copper 0.4 mg/mL (Cupric Chloride Injection, USP) is administered to a nursing woman. Pediatric Use (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION section.) There are limited data in infants weighing less than 1500 grams. Pregnancy Category C. Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with cupric chloride. It is also not known whether cupric chloride can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproductive capacity. Cupric chloride should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly indicated. Geriatric Use An evaluation of current literature revealed no clinical experience identifying differences in response between elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.
Adverse reactions
ADVERSE REACTIONS None known.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Copper 0.4 mg/mL (Cupric Chloride Injection, USP) contains 0.4 mg copper/mL and is administered intravenously only after dilution. The additive should be diluted in a volume of fluid not less than 100 mL. For the adult receiving TPN, the suggested additive dosage is 0.5 to 1.5 mg copper/day (1.25 to 3.75 mL/day). For pediatric patients, the suggested additive dosage is 20 mcg copper/kg/day (0.05 mL/kg/day). Infants weighing less than 1500 gm may have increased requirements because of their low body reserves and increased requirements for growth. Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit. (See PRECAUTIONS .)
Pregnancy and lactation
Nursing Mothers It is not known whether this drug is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when Copper 0.4 mg/mL (Cupric Chloride Injection, USP) is administered to a nursing woman.

Interactions

Drug Interactions Cupric ion may degrade ascorbic acid in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions. In order to avoid this loss of ascorbate, multivitamin additives should be added to TPN solutions immediately prior to infusion. Alternatively, the multivitamin additive may be added to one container of TPN solution, followed by copper in a subsequent container.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA018960
Agency product number S2QG84156O
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 0409-4092
Date Last Revised 30-06-2014
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 204536
Marketing authorisation holder Hospira, Inc.