Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 25 January 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE CINVANTI, in combination with other antiemetic agents, is indicated in adults for the prevention of: acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy (HEC) including high-dose cisplatin. nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of moderately emetogenic cancer chemotherapy (MEC). Limitations of Use CINVANTI has not been studied for the treatment of established nausea and vomiting. CINVANTI is a substance P/neurokinin-1 (NK 1) receptor antagonist, indicated in adults, in combination with other antiemetic agents, for the prevention of: acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy (HEC) including high-dose cisplatin. (1) nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of moderately emetogenic cancer chemotherapy (MEC). (1) Limitations of Use: CINVANTI has not been studied for treatment of established nausea and vomiting. (1)

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS CINVANTI is contraindicated in patients: who are hypersensitive to any component of the product. Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylactic reactions have been reported with fosaprepitant and oral aprepitant [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2), Adverse Reactions (6.2)]. taking pimozide. Inhibition of CYP3A4 by aprepitant could result in elevated plasma concentrations of pimozide, which is a CYP3A4 substrate, potentially causing serious or life-threatening reactions, such as QT prolongation, a known adverse reaction of pimozide [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Known hypersensitivity to any component of this drug. (4, 5.2) Concurrent use with pimozide. (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS Most common adverse reactions with the 3-day oral aprepitant regimen in conjunction with MEC (≥ 1% and greater than standard therapy) were: fatigue and eructation. (6.1) Most common adverse reactions with the single-dose fosaprepitant regimen in conjunction with HEC were generally similar to that seen in prior HEC studies with oral aprepitant. In addition, infusion site reactions (3%) occurred. (6.1) Most common adverse reactions with single-dose CINVANTI (>2%) were: headache and fatigue. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Heron Therapeutics, Inc. at 1-844-437-6611 and www.CINVANTI.com or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice. The safety of CINVANTI was evaluated as a single-dose in healthy subjects and established from adequate and well-controlled studies of intravenous fosaprepitant and/or oral aprepitant [see Clinical Studies (14)]. Adverse reactions observed in these adequate and well-controlled studies are described below. Safety of CINVANTI A total of 200 healthy subjects received a single 130 mg dose of CINVANTI as a 30-minute infusion. Adverse reactions reported in at least 2% of subjects were headache (3%) and fatigue (2%). Single-Dose Intravenous Fosaprepitant -- HEC In an active-controlled clinical study in patients receiving HEC, safety was evaluated for 1143 patients receiving a single intravenous dose of fosaprepitant, a prodrug of aprepitant, compared to 1169 patients receiving a 3-day regimen of oral aprepitant [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. When administered intravenously, fosaprepitant is converted to aprepitant within 30 minutes. The safety profile was generally similar to that seen in prior HEC studies with a 3-day regimen of oral aprepitant. However, infusion-site reactions occurred at a higher incidence in patients in the intravenous fosaprepitant group (3%) compared to those in the oral aprepitant group (0.5%). The reported infusion-site reactions included: infusion-site erythema, infusion-site pruritus, infusion-site pain, infusion-site induration and infusion-site thrombophlebitis. Adverse reactions associated with oral aprepitant may also be expected to occur with CINVANTI. See the full prescribing information for oral aprepitant for complete safety information. 3-Day Oral Aprepitant -- MEC In 2 active-controlled clinical trials in patients receiving MEC, 868 patients were treated with a 3-day oral aprepitant regimen during Cycle 1 of chemotherapy and 686 of these patients continued into extensions for up to 4 cycles of chemotherapy. In both studies, oral aprepitant was given in combination with ondansetron and dexamethasone (oral aprepitant regimen) and was compared to ondansetron and dexamethasone alone (standard therapy) [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. In the combined analysis of Cycle 1 data for these 2 studies, adverse reactions were reported in approximately 14% of patients treated with the aprepitant regimen compared with approximately 15% of patients treated with standard therapy. Treatment was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 0.7% of patients treated with the aprepitant regimen compared with 0.2% of patients treated with standard therapy. The most common adverse reactions reported in patients treated with the oral aprepitant regimen with an incidence of at least 1% and greater than standard therapy are listed in Table 4. Table 4. Adverse Reactions (≥ 1%) in Patients Receiving MEC with a Greater Incidence in the Oral 3-Day Aprepitant Regimen Relative to Standard Therapy Oral Aprepitant Regimen (N = 868) Standard Therapy (N = 846) Fatigue 1.4 0.9 Eructation 1.0 0.1 A listing of adverse reactions reported in less than 1% in patients treated with the oral aprepitant regimen that occurred at a incidence greater than in patients treated with standard therapy are presented in the Less Common Adverse Reactions subsection below. Less Common Adverse Reactions Adverse reactions reported in studies in patients treated with the 3-day oral aprepitant regimen with an incidence < 1% and greater than standard therapy are listed in Table 5. Table 5. Adverse Reactions (incidence < 1%) in Patients Observed in Studies with a Greater Incidence in the Oral Aprepitant Regimen Relative to Standard Therapy Infection and infestations candidiasis, staphylococcal infection Blood and the lymphatic system disorders anemia, febrile neutropenia Metabolism and nutrition disorders weight gain, polydipsia Psychiatric disorders disorientation, euphoria, anxiety Nervous system disorders dizziness, dream abnormality, cognitive disorder, lethargy, somnolence Eye disorders conjunctivitis Ear and labyrinth disorders tinnitus Cardiac disorders bradycardia, cardiovascular disorder, palpitations Vascular disorders hot flush, flushing Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders pharyngitis, sneezing, cough, postnasal drip, throat irritation Gastrointestinal disorders nausea, acid reflux, dysgeusia, epigastric discomfort, obstipation, gastroesophageal reflux disease, perforating duodenal ulcer, vomiting, abdominal pain, dry mouth, abdominal distension, feces hard, neutropenic colitis, flatulence, stomatitis Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders rash, acne, photosensitivity, hyperhidrosis, oily skin, pruritus, skin lesion Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders muscle cramp, myalgia, muscular weakness Renal and urinary disorders polyuria, dysuria, pollakiuria General disorders and administration site condition edema, chest discomfort, malaise, thirst, chills, gait disturbance Investigations alkaline phosphatase increased, hyperglycemia, microscopic hematuria, hyponatremia, weight decreased, neutrophil count decreased In another chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting study, Stevens-Johnson syndrome was reported as a serious adverse reaction in a patient receiving aprepitant with cancer chemotherapy. The adverse experience profiles in the Multiple-Cycle extensions of HEC and MEC studies for up to 6 cycles of chemotherapy were similar to that observed in Cycle 1. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of intravenous fosaprepitant and/or oral aprepitant. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: pruritus, rash, urticaria, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Immune system disorders: hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis and anaphylactic shock [see Contraindications (4), Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Nervous system disorders: ifosfamide-induced neurotoxicity reported after aprepitant and ifosfamide coadministration.

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Dosage: HEC (Single Dose Regimen): The recommended dosage in adults is 130 mg on Day 1 as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes approximately 30 minutes prior to chemotherapy. (2.1) MEC (3-Day Regimen): The recommended dosage in adults is 100 mg administered on Day 1 as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes approximately 30 minutes prior to chemotherapy. Aprepitant capsules (80 mg) are given orally on Days 2 and 3. (2.1) CINVANTI is part of a regimen that includes a corticosteroid and a 5-HT3 antagonist. (2.1) Preparation: See the full prescribing information for instructions. (2.2) 2.1 Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting Associated with HEC and MEC The recommended dosages in adults of CINVANTI, dexamethasone, and a 5-HT3 antagonist for the prevention of nausea and vomiting associated with administration of HEC or MEC are shown in Table 1 and Table 2, respectively. Table 1. Recommended Dosage of CINVANTI for the Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting Associated with HEC (Single Dose Regimen) Agent Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 CINVANTI 130 mg intravenously over 30 minutes approximately 30 minutes prior to chemotherapy None None None DexamethasoneAdminister dexamethasone 30 minutes prior to chemotherapy treatment on Day 1 and in the morning on Days 2 through 4. Also administer dexamethasone in the evenings on Days 3 and 4. A 50% dosage reduction of dexamethasone on Days 1 and 2 is recommended to account for a drug interaction with aprepitant [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 12 mg orally 8 mg orally 8 mg orally twice daily 8 mg orally twice daily 5-HT3 antagonist See selected 5-HT3 antagonist prescribing information for recommended dosage None None None Table 2. Recommended Dosage of CINVANTI for the Prevention of Nausea and Vomiting Associated with MEC (3-Day Regimen with Oral Aprepitant on Days 2 and 3) Agent Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 CINVANTI 100 mg intravenously over 30 minutes approximately 30 minutes prior to chemotherapy None None Oral Aprepitant None 80 mg orally 80 mg orally DexamethasoneAdminister dexamethasone 30 minutes prior to chemotherapy treatment on Day 1. A 50% dosage reduction of dexamethasone is recommended to account for a drug interaction with aprepitant [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 12 mg orally None None 5-HT3 antagonist See selected 5-HT3 antagonist prescribing information for recommended dosage None None 2.2 Preparation of CINVANTI for Intravenous Infusion Table 3 includes preparation instructions for CINVANTI for HEC as a 130 mg single-dose regimen and for MEC as a 100 mg single dose followed by 2 days of oral aprepitant as a 3-day regimen. Differences in preparation for each dose are displayed as bolded text. Table 3. Preparation Instructions for CINVANTI 130 mg CINVANTI (HEC Regimen) 100 mg CINVANTI (MEC Regimen)the MEC regimen consists of a single 100 mg dose of CINVANTI on Day 1, followed by oral aprepitant on Days 2 and 3. Step 1 Aseptically prepare an infusion bagUse only Non-DEHP tubing, non-PVC infusion bags filled with 130 mL of 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP or 5% Dextrose for Injection, USP. Aseptically prepare an infusion bag filled with 100 mL of 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP or 5% Dextrose for Injection, USP. Step 2 Aseptically withdraw 18 mL from the vial and transfer it into the infusion bag to yield a total volume of 148 mL. Aseptically withdraw 14 mL from the vial and transfer it into the infusion bag to yield a total volume of 114 mL. Step 3 Gently invert the bag 4 to 5 times. Avoid shaking. Gently invert the bag 4 to 5 times. Avoid shaking. Step 4 Before administration, inspect the bag for particulate matter and discoloration. Discard the bag if particulate and/or discoloration are observed. Before administration, inspect the bag for particulate matter and discoloration. Discard the bag if particulate and/or discoloration are observed. Note: The differences in preparation for each dose are displayed in bolded text Caution: Do not mix CINVANTI with solutions for which physical and chemical compatibility have not been established. CINVANTI is incompatible with any solutions containing divalent cations (e.g. calcium, magnesium), including Lactated Ringer’s Solution and Hartmann's Solution. Storage The diluted CINVANTI solution is stable at ambient room temperature for 6 hours in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP or 12 hours in 5% Dextrose Injection, USP.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Pregnancy: May cause fetal harm. (8.1) 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary There are no available data on CINVANTI use in pregnant women to inform a drug-associated risk of adverse developmental outcomes. Avoid use of CINVANTI in pregnant women due to the alcohol content (see Clinical Considerations). In animal reproduction studies, no adverse developmental effects were observed in rats or rabbits exposed during the period of organogenesis to systemic drug concentrations (area under the plasma-concentration time curve [AUC]) of aprepitant approximately equivalent to the exposure at the recommended human dose (RHD) of CINVANTI 130 mg (see Data). The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Fetal/Neonatal adverse reactions CINVANTI contains alcohol. Published studies have demonstrated that alcohol is associated with fetal harm including central nervous system abnormalities, behavioral disorders, and impaired intellectual development. There is no safe level of alcohol exposure in pregnancy; therefore, avoid use of CINVANTI in pregnant women. Data Animal Data In embryofetal development studies in rats and rabbits, aprepitant was administered during the period of organogenesis at oral doses up to 1000 mg/kg twice daily (rats) and up to the maximum tolerated dose of 25 mg/kg/day (rabbits). No embryofetal lethality or malformations were observed at any dose level in either species. The exposures (AUC) in pregnant rats at 1000 mg/kg twice daily and in pregnant rabbits at 125 mg/kg/day were approximately equivalent to the exposure at the RHD of CINVANTI 130 mg. Aprepitant crosses the placenta in rats and rabbits. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There are no data on the presence of aprepitant in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Aprepitant is present in rat milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for CINVANTI and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from CINVANTI or from the underlying maternal condition. 8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential Contraception Upon administration of CINVANTI, the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives may be reduced. Advise females of reproductive potential using hormonal contraceptives to use an effective alternative or back-up non-hormonal contraceptive (such as condoms or spermicides) during treatment with CINVANTI and for 1 month following the last dose of CINVANTI or oral aprepitant, whichever is administered last [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4), Drug Interactions (7.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of CINVANTI have not been established in pediatric patients. 8.5 Geriatric Use In 2 well-controlled chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting clinical studies, of the total number of patients (N = 544) treated with oral aprepitant, 31% were 65 and over, while 5% were 75 and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects. In general, use caution when dosing elderly patients as they have a greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal or cardiac function and concomitant disease or other drug therapy [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 8.6 Hepatic Impairment The pharmacokinetics of aprepitant in patients with mild and moderate hepatic impairment were similar to those of healthy subjects with normal hepatic function. No dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score 5 to 9). There are no clinical or pharmacokinetic data in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score greater than 9). Therefore, additional monitoring for adverse reactions in these patients may be warranted when CINVANTI is administered [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Pregnancy and lactation
8.2 Lactation Risk Summary There are no data on the presence of aprepitant in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Aprepitant is present in rat milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for CINVANTI and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from CINVANTI or from the underlying maternal condition.

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS See Full Prescribing Information for a list of clinically significant drug interactions. (4, 5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 7.1, 7.2) 7.1 Effect of Aprepitant on the Pharmacokinetics of Other Drugs Aprepitant is a substrate, weak-to-moderate (dose-dependent) inhibitor, and an inducer of CYP3A4. Aprepitant is also an inducer of CYP2C9 [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Some substrates of CYP3A4 are contraindicated with CINVANTI [see Contraindications (4)]. Dosage adjustment of some CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 substrates may be warranted, as shown in Table 6. Table 6. Effects of Aprepitant on the Pharmacokinetics of Other Drugs CYP3A4 Substrates Pimozide Clinical Impact Increased pimozide exposure. Intervention CINVANTI is contraindicated [see Contraindications (4)]. Benzodiazepines Clinical Impact Increased exposure to midazolam or other benzodiazepines metabolized via CYP3A4 (alprazolam, triazolam) may increase the risk of adverse reactions [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention Monitor for benzodiazepine-related adverse reactions. Dexamethasone Clinical Impact Increased dexamethasone exposure [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention Reduce the dose of oral dexamethasone by approximately 50% [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)]. Methylprednisolone Clinical Impact Increased methylprednisolone exposure [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention Reduce the dose of oral methylprednisolone by approximately 50% on Days 1 and 2 for patients receiving HEC and on Day 1 for patients receiving MEC. Reduce the dose of intravenous methylprednisolone by 25% on Days 1 and 2 for patients receiving HEC and on Day 1 for patients receiving MEC. Chemotherapeutic Agents that are Metabolized by CYP3A4 Clinical Impact Increased exposure of the chemotherapeutic agent may increase the risk of adverse reactions [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention Vinblastine, vincristine, or ifosfamide or other chemotherapeutic agents Monitor for chemotherapeutic-related adverse reactions. Etoposide, vinorelbine, paclitaxel, and docetaxel No dosage adjustment needed. Hormonal Contraceptives Clinical Impact Decreased estrogen and progestin exposure during administration of and for 28 days after administration of the last dose of aprepitant [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4), Use in Specific Populations (8.3), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention Effective alternative or back-up methods of contraception (such as condoms and spermicides) should be used during treatment with CINIVANTI and for 1 month following administration of CINVANTI or oral aprepitant, whichever is administered last. Examples birth control pills, skin patches, implants, and certain IUDs CYP2C9 Substrates Warfarin Clinical Impact Decreased warfarin exposure and prolongation of prothrombin time (INR) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention In patients on chronic warfarin therapy, monitor the prothrombin time (INR) in the 2-week period, particularly at 7 to 10 days, following administration of CINVANTI with each chemotherapy cycle. Other Antiemetic Agents 5-HT3 Antagonists Clinical Impact No change in the exposure of the 5-HT3 antagonist [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention No dosage adjustment needed. Examples ondansetron, granisetron, dolasetron 7.2 Effect of Other Drugs on the Pharmacokinetics of Aprepitant Aprepitant is a CYP3A4 substrate [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Co-administration of CINVANTI with drugs that are inhibitors or inducers of CYP3A4 may result in increased or decreased plasma concentrations of aprepitant, respectively, as shown in Table 7. Table 7. Effects of Other Drugs on Pharmacokinetics of Aprepitant Moderate to Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors Clinical Impact Significantly increased exposure of aprepitant may increase the risk of adverse reactions associated with CINVANTI [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention Avoid concomitant use of CINVANTI. Examples Moderate inhibitor: diltiazem Strong inhibitors: ketoconazole, itraconazole, nefazodone, troleandomycin, clarithromycin, ritonavir, nelfinavir Strong CYP3A4 Inducers Clinical Impact Substantially decreased exposure of aprepitant in patients chronically taking a strong CYP3A4 inducer may decrease the efficacy of CINVANTI [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Intervention Avoid concomitant use of CINVANTI. Examples rifampin, carbamazepine, phenytoin

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA209296
Agency product number 1NF15YR6UY
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 47426-201
Date Last Revised 16-11-2017
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 1995155
Marketing authorisation holder Heron Therapeutics