Data from FDA - Curated by EPG Health - Last updated 05 July 2018

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE CADUET (amlodipine and atorvastatin) is indicated in patients for whom treatment with both amlodipine and atorvastatin is appropriate. CADUET is a combination of amlodipine besylate, a calcium channel blocker, and atorvastatin calcium, a HMG CoA-reductase inhibitor, indicated in patients for whom treatment with both amlodipine and atorvastatin is appropriate. Amlodipine is indicated for the treatment of hypertension, to lower blood pressure (1.1). Lowering blood pressure reduces the risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, primarily strokes and myocardial infarctions. Amlodipine is indicated for the treatment of Coronary Artery Disease (1.2). Atorvastatin is indicated as an adjunct therapy to diet for prevention of cardiovascular disease (1.3) and hyperlipidemia (1.4). Amlodipine 1.1 Hypertension Amlodipine is indicated for the treatment of hypertension, to lower blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure reduces the risk of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, primarily strokes and myocardial infarctions. These benefits have been seen in controlled trials of antihypertensive drugs from a wide variety of pharmacologic classes including amlodipine. Control of high blood pressure should be part of comprehensive cardiovascular risk management, including, as appropriate, lipid control, diabetes management, antithrombotic therapy, smoking cessation, exercise, and limited sodium intake. Many patients will require more than one drug to achieve blood pressure goals. For specific advice on goals and management, see published guidelines, such as those of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program's Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC). Numerous antihypertensive drugs, from a variety of pharmacologic classes and with different mechanisms of action, have been shown in randomized controlled trials to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and it can be concluded that it is blood pressure reduction, and not some other pharmacologic property of the drugs, that is largely responsible for those benefits. The largest and most consistent cardiovascular outcome benefit has been a reduction in the risk of stroke, but reductions in myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality also have been seen regularly. Elevated systolic or diastolic pressure causes increased cardiovascular risk, and the absolute risk increase per mmHg is greater at higher blood pressures, so that even modest reductions of severe hypertension can provide substantial benefit. Relative risk reduction from blood pressure reduction is similar across populations with varying absolute risk, so the absolute benefit is greater in patients who are at higher risk independent of their hypertension (for example, patients with diabetes or hyperlipidemia), and such patients would be expected to benefit from more aggressive treatment to a lower blood pressure goal. Some antihypertensive drugs have smaller blood pressure effects (as monotherapy) in black patients, and many antihypertensive drugs have additional approved indications and effects (e.g., on angina, heart failure, or diabetic kidney disease). These considerations may guide selection of therapy. Amlodipine may be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. 1.2 Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Chronic Stable Angina Amlodipine is indicated for the symptomatic treatment of chronic stable angina. Amlodipine may be used alone or in combination with other antianginal agents. Vasospastic Angina (Prinzmetal's or Variant Angina) Amlodipine is indicated for the treatment of confirmed or suspected vasospastic angina. Amlodipine may be used as monotherapy or in combination with other antianginal agents. Angiographically Documented CAD In patients with recently documented CAD by angiography and without heart failure or an ejection fraction < 40%, amlodipine is indicated to reduce the risk of hospitalization for angina and to reduce the risk of a coronary revascularization procedure. Atorvastatin Therapy with HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors (lipid-altering agents) should be only one component of multiple risk factor intervention in individuals at significantly increased risk for atherosclerotic vascular disease from hypercholesterolemia. Drug therapy is recommended as an adjunct to diet when the response to a diet restricted in saturated fat and cholesterol and other nonpharmacologic measures alone has been inadequate. In patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or multiple risk factors for CHD, atorvastatin can be started simultaneously with diet restriction. 1.3 Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) In adult patients without clinically evident coronary heart disease, but with multiple risk factors for coronary heart disease such as age, smoking, hypertension, low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), or a family history of early coronary heart disease, atorvastatin is indicated to: Reduce the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) Reduce the risk of stroke Reduce the risk for revascularization procedures and angina In patients with type 2 diabetes, and without clinically evident coronary heart disease, but with multiple risk factors for coronary heart disease such as retinopathy, albuminuria, smoking, or hypertension, atorvastatin is indicated to: Reduce the risk of myocardial infarction Reduce the risk of stroke In patients with clinically evident coronary heart disease, atorvastatin is indicated to: Reduce the risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction Reduce the risk of fatal and non-fatal stroke Reduce the risk for revascularization procedures Reduce the risk of hospitalization for congestive heart failure (CHF) Reduce the risk of angina 1.4 Hyperlipidemia Atorvastatin is indicated: As an adjunct to diet to reduce elevated total cholesterol (total-C) , LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein B (apo B), and triglycerides (TG) levels and to increase HDL-C in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia (heterozygous familial and nonfamilial) and mixed dyslipidemia (Fredrickson Types IIa and IIb) As an adjunct to diet for the treatment of patients with elevated serum TG levels (Fredrickson Type IV); For the treatment of patients with primary dysbetalipoproteinemia (Fredrickson Type III) who do not respond adequately to diet To reduce total-C and LDL-C in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia as an adjunct to other lipid-lowering treatments (e.g., LDL apheresis) or if such treatments are unavailable As an adjunct to diet to reduce total-C, LDL-C, and apo B levels in boys and postmenarchal girls, 10 to 17 years of age, with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia if after an adequate trial of diet therapy the following findings are present: LDL-C remains ≥ 190 mg/dL or LDL-C remains ≥ 160 mg/dL and: there is a positive family history of premature CVD or two or more other CVD risk factors are present in the pediatric patient 1.5 Limitations of Use Atorvastatin has not been studied in conditions where the major lipoprotein abnormality is elevation of chylomicrons (Fredrickson Types I and V).

Learning Zones

An epgonline.org Learning Zone (LZ) is an area of the site dedicated to providing detailed self-directed medical education about a disease, condition or procedure.

Anticoagulation Therapy for Stroke Prevention

Anticoagulation Therapy for Stroke Prevention

Anticoagulation therapy for Stroke Prevention Learning Zone offers a deep-dive into atrial fibrillation causes, consequences, diagnosis and management to help you deliver optimal care and prevent strokes in patients living with this common arrhythmia.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL)

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL)

Refine your knowledge of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) with information on pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment options and more

+ 1 more

Transplantation

Transplantation

See information on best practice in solid organ transplantation, and expert discussions on related hot topics.

Load more

Related Content

Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS Active Liver Disease Atorvastatin is contraindicated in patients with active liver disease, which may include unexplained persistent elevations in hepatic transaminase levels [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Pregnancy [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)] Lactation [see Use in Specific Populations (8.2)] Active liver disease (4) Pregnancy (4) Lactation (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS The following serious adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the label: Rhabdomyolysis and myopathy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] Liver enzyme abnormalities [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] Most common adverse reaction (3% greater than placebo) to amlodipine is edema (6.1). Most common adverse reactions leading to atorvastatin discontinuation were myalgia and diarrhea (6.1). To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Pfizer at 1-800-438-1985 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. CADUET CADUET (amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium) has been evaluated for safety in 1,092 patients in double-blind placebo-controlled studies treated for co-morbid hypertension and dyslipidemia. In general, treatment with CADUET was well tolerated. For the most part, adverse reactions have been mild or moderate in severity. In clinical trials with CADUET, no adverse reactions peculiar to this combination have been observed. Adverse reactions are similar in terms of nature, severity, and frequency to those reported previously with amlodipine and atorvastatin. The following information is based on the clinical experience with amlodipine and atorvastatin. Amlodipine Amlodipine has been evaluated for safety in more than 11,000 patients in U.S. and foreign clinical trials. In general, treatment with amlodipine was well tolerated at doses up to 10 mg daily. Most adverse reactions reported during therapy with amlodipine were of mild or moderate severity. In controlled clinical trials directly comparing amlodipine (N=1,730) at doses up to 10 mg to placebo (N=1,250), discontinuation of amlodipine because of adverse reactions was required in only about 1.5% of patients and was not significantly different from placebo (about 1%). The most commonly reported side effects more frequent than placebo are dizziness and edema. The incidence (%) of side effects that occurred in a dose-related manner are as follows: Amlodipine 2.5 mg 5 mg 10 mg Placebo N=275 N=296 N=268 N=520 Edema 1.8 3.0 10.8 0.6 Dizziness 1.1 3.4 3.4 1.5 Flushing 0.7 1.4 2.6 0.0 Palpitations 0.7 1.4 4.5 0.6 Other adverse reactions that were not clearly dose related but were reported at an incidence greater than 1.0% in placebo-controlled clinical trials include the following: Amlodipine (%) Placebo (%) (N=1730) (N=1250) Fatigue 4.5 2.8 Nausea 2.9 1.9 Abdominal Pain 1.6 0.3 Somnolence 1.4 0.6 Edema, flushing, palpitations, and somnolence appear to be more common in women than in men. The following events occurred in < 1% but > 0.1% of patients treated with amlodipine in controlled clinical trials or under conditions of open trials or marketing experience where a causal relationship is uncertain; they are listed to alert the physician to a possible relationship: Cardiovascular: arrhythmia (including ventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation), bradycardia, chest pain, peripheral ischemia, syncope, tachycardia, vasculitis. Central and Peripheral Nervous System: hypoesthesia, neuropathy peripheral, paresthesia, tremor, vertigo. Gastrointestinal: anorexia, constipation, dysphagia, diarrhea, flatulence, pancreatitis, vomiting, gingival hyperplasia. General: allergic reaction, asthenia,These events occurred in less than 1% in placebo-controlled trials, but the incidence of these side effects was between 1% and 2% in all multiple dose studies. back pain, hot flushes, malaise, pain, rigors, weight gain, weight decrease. Musculoskeletal System: arthralgia, arthrosis, muscle cramps, myalgia. Psychiatric: sexual dysfunction (male and female), insomnia, nervousness, depression, abnormal dreams, anxiety, depersonalization. Respiratory System: dyspnea, epistaxis. Skin and Appendages: angioedema, erythema multiforme, pruritus, rash, rash erythematous, rash maculopapular. Special Senses: abnormal vision, conjunctivitis, diplopia, eye pain, tinnitus. Urinary System: micturition frequency, micturition disorder, nocturia. Autonomic Nervous System: dry mouth, sweating increased. Metabolic and Nutritional: hyperglycemia, thirst. Hemopoietic: leukopenia, purpura, thrombocytopenia. Amlodipine therapy has not been associated with clinically significant changes in routine laboratory tests. No clinically relevant changes were noted in serum potassium, serum glucose, total triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, or creatinine. Atorvastatin In the atorvastatin placebo-controlled clinical trial database of 16,066 patients (8,755 atorvastatin vs. 7,311 placebo; age range 10–93 years, 39% women, 91% Caucasians, 3% Blacks, 2% Asians, 4% other) with a median treatment duration of 53 weeks, 9.7% of patients on atorvastatin and 9.5% of the patients on placebo discontinued because of adverse reactions regardless of causality. The five most common adverse reactions in patients treated with atorvastatin that led to treatment discontinuation and occurred at a rate greater than placebo were: myalgia (0.7%), diarrhea (0.5%), nausea (0.4%), alanine aminotransferase increase (0.4%), and hepatic enzyme increase (0.4%). The most commonly reported adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 2% and greater than placebo) regardless of causality, in patients treated with atorvastatin in placebo-controlled trials (n=8,755) were: nasopharyngitis (8.3%), arthralgia (6.9%), diarrhea (6.8%), pain in extremity (6.0%), and urinary tract infection (5.7%). Table 3 summarizes the frequency of clinical adverse reactions, regardless of causality, reported in ≥ 2% and at a rate greater than placebo in patients treated with atorvastatin (n=8,755), from seventeen placebo-controlled trials. Table 3. Clinical Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥ 2% in Patients Treated with Any Dose of Atorvastatin and at an Incidence Greater than Placebo Regardless of Causality (% of Patients) Adverse ReactionAdverse Reaction ≥ 2% in any dose greater than placebo. Any dose N=8755 10 mg N=3908 20 mg N=188 40 mg N=604 80 mg N=4055 Placebo N=7311 Nasopharyngitis 8.3 12.9 5.3 7.0 4.2 8.2 Arthralgia 6.9 8.9 11.7 10.6 4.3 6.5 Diarrhea 6.8 7.3 6.4 14.1 5.2 6.3 Pain in extremity 6.0 8.5 3.7 9.3 3.1 5.9 Urinary tract infection 5.7 6.9 6.4 8.0 4.1 5.6 Dyspepsia 4.7 5.9 3.2 6.0 3.3 4.3 Nausea 4.0 3.7 3.7 7.1 3.8 3.5 Musculoskeletal pain 3.8 5.2 3.2 5.1 2.3 3.6 Muscle spasms 3.6 4.6 4.8 5.1 2.4 3.0 Myalgia 3.5 3.6 5.9 8.4 2.7 3.1 Insomnia 3.0 2.8 1.1 5.3 2.8 2.9 Pharyngolaryngeal pain 2.3 3.9 1.6 2.8 0.7 2.1 Other adverse reactions reported in placebo-controlled studies include: Body as a whole: malaise, pyrexia; Digestive system: abdominal discomfort, eructation, flatulence, hepatitis, cholestasis; Musculoskeletal system: musculoskeletal pain, muscle fatigue, neck pain, joint swelling; Metabolic and nutritional system: transaminases increase, liver function test abnormal, blood alkaline phosphatase increase, creatine phosphokinase increase, hyperglycemia; Nervous system: nightmare; Respiratory system: epistaxis; Skin and appendages: urticaria; Special senses: vision blurred, tinnitus; Urogenital system: white blood cells urine positive. Treating to New Targets Study (TNT) In TNT [see Clinical Studies (14.6)] involving 10,001 subjects (age range 29–78 years, 19% women; 94.1% Caucasians, 2.9% Blacks, 1.0% Asians, 2.0% other) with clinically evident CHD treated with atorvastatin 10 mg daily (n=5,006) or atorvastatin 80 mg daily (n=4,995), serious adverse reactions and discontinuations because of adverse reactions increased with dose. Persistent transaminase elevations (≥ 3 × ULN twice within 4–10 days) occurred in 62 (1.3%) individuals with atorvastatin 80 mg and in nine (0.2%) individuals with atorvastatin 10 mg. Elevations of CK (≥ 10 × ULN) were low overall, but were higher in the high-dose atorvastatin treatment group (13, 0.3%) compared to the low-dose atorvastatin group (6, 0.1%). Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) In SPARCL involving 4,731 subjects (age range 21–92 years, 40% women; 93.3% Caucasians, 3.0% Blacks, 0.6% Asians, 3.1% other) without clinically evident CHD but with a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within the previous 6 months treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (n=2,365) or placebo (n=2,366) for a median follow-up of 4.9 years, there was a higher incidence of persistent hepatic transaminase elevations (≥ 3 × ULN twice within 4–10 days) in the atorvastatin group (0.9%) compared to placebo (0.1%). Elevations of CK (>10 × ULN) were rare, but were higher in the atorvastatin group (0.1%) compared to placebo (0.0%). Diabetes was reported as an adverse reaction in 144 subjects (6.1%) in the atorvastatin group and 89 subjects (3.8%) in the placebo group [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)]. In a post-hoc analysis, atorvastatin 80 mg reduced the incidence of ischemic stroke (218/2365, 9.2% vs. 274/2366, 11.6%) and increased the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke (55/2365, 2.3% vs. 33/2366, 1.4%) compared to placebo. The incidence of fatal hemorrhagic stroke was similar between groups (17 atorvastatin vs. 18 placebo). The incidence of non-fatal hemorrhagic strokes was significantly greater in the atorvastatin group (38 non-fatal hemorrhagic strokes) as compared to the placebo group (16 non-fatal hemorrhagic strokes). Subjects who entered the study with a hemorrhagic stroke appeared to be at increased risk for hemorrhagic stroke [7 (16%) atorvastatin vs. 2 (4%) placebo]. There were no significant differences between the treatment groups for all-cause mortality: 216 (9.1%) in the atorvastatin 80 mg/day group vs. 211 (8.9%) in the placebo group. The proportions of subjects who experienced cardiovascular death were numerically smaller in the atorvastatin 80 mg group (3.3%) than in the placebo group (4.1%). The proportions of subjects who experienced non-cardiovascular death were numerically larger in the atorvastatin 80 mg group (5.0%) than in the placebo group (4.0%). Pediatrics: In a 26-week controlled study in boys and postmenarchal girls (n=140, 31% female; 92% Caucasians, 1.6% Blacks, 1.6% Asians, 4.8% other), the safety and tolerability profile of atorvastatin 10 to 20 mg daily was generally similar to that of placebo [see Clinical Studies (14.11) and Use in Specific Populations (8.4)]. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval of amlodipine and atorvastatin. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Amlodipine The following postmarketing event has been reported infrequently where a causal relationship is uncertain: gynecomastia. In postmarketing experience, jaundice and hepatic enzyme elevations (mostly consistent with cholestasis or hepatitis), in some cases severe enough to require hospitalization, have been reported in association with use of amlodipine. Postmarketing reporting has also revealed a possible association between extrapyramidal disorder and amlodipine. Amlodipine has been used safely in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, well-compensated congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and abnormal lipid profiles. Atorvastatin Adverse reactions associated with atorvastatin therapy reported since market introduction that are not listed above, regardless of causality assessment, include the following: anaphylaxis, angioneurotic edema, bullous rashes (including erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis), rhabdomyolysis, myositis, fatigue, tendon rupture, fatal and non-fatal hepatic failure, dizziness, depression, peripheral neuropathy, pancreatitis and interstitial lung disease. There have been rare reports of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy associated with statin use [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. There have been rare postmarketing reports of cognitive impairment (e.g., memory loss, forgetfulness, amnesia, memory impairment, confusion) associated with statin use. These cognitive issues have been reported for all statins. The reports are generally nonserious, and reversible upon statin discontinuation, with variable times to symptom onset (1 day to years) and symptom resolution (median of 3 weeks).

Usage information

Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Usual starting dose (mg daily) Maximum dose (mg daily) Amlodipine 5Start small adults or children, fragile, or elderly patients, or patients with hepatic insufficiency on 2.5 mg once daily (2) 10 Atorvastatin 10–20Start patients requiring large LDL-C reduction (> 45%) at 40 mg once daily (2) 80 CADUET Dosage of CADUET must be individualized on the basis of both effectiveness and tolerance for each individual component in the treatment of hypertension/angina and hyperlipidemia. Select doses of amlodipine and atorvastatin independently. CADUET may be substituted for its individually titrated components. Patients may be given the equivalent dose of CADUET or a dose of CADUET with increased amounts of amlodipine, atorvastatin, or both for additional antianginal effects, blood pressure lowering, or lipid-lowering effect. CADUET may be used to provide additional therapy for patients already on one of its components. CADUET may be used to initiate treatment in patients with hyperlipidemia and either hypertension or angina. Amlodipine The usual initial antihypertensive oral dose of amlodipine is 5 mg once daily, and the maximum dose is 10 mg once daily. Pediatric (age > 6 years), small adult, fragile, or elderly patients, or patients with hepatic insufficiency may be started on 2.5 mg once daily and this dose may be used when adding amlodipine to other antihypertensive therapy. Adjust dosage according to blood pressure goals. In general, wait 7 to 14 days between titration steps. Titration may proceed more rapidly, however, if clinically warranted, provided the patient is assessed frequently. Angina: The recommended dose of amlodipine for chronic stable or vasospastic angina is 5–10 mg, with the lower dose suggested in the elderly and in patients with hepatic insufficiency. Most patients will require 10 mg for adequate effect. Coronary Artery Disease: The recommended dose range of amlodipine for patients with CAD is 5–10 mg once daily. In clinical studies, the majority of patients required 10 mg [see Clinical Studies (14.4)]. Pediatrics: The effective antihypertensive oral dose of amlodipine in pediatric patients ages 6–17 years is 2.5 mg to 5 mg once daily. Doses in excess of 5 mg daily have not been studied in pediatric patients [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Clinical Studies (14.1)]. Atorvastatin (Hyperlipidemia) Hyperlipidemia (Heterozygous Familial and Nonfamilial) and Mixed Dyslipidemia (Fredrickson Types IIa and IIb): The recommended starting dose of atorvastatin is 10 or 20 mg once daily. Patients who require a large reduction in LDL-C (more than 45%) may be started at 40 mg once daily. The dosage range of atorvastatin is 10 to 80 mg once daily. Atorvastatin can be administered as a single dose at any time of the day, with or without food. The starting dose and maintenance doses of atorvastatin should be individualized according to patient characteristics such as goal of therapy and response (see current NCEP Guidelines). After initiation and/or upon titration of atorvastatin, lipid levels should be analyzed within 2 to 4 weeks and dosage adjusted accordingly. Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia: The dosage range of atorvastatin in patients with homozygous FH is 10 to 80 mg daily. Atorvastatin should be used as an adjunct to other lipid-lowering treatments (e.g., LDL apheresis) in these patients or if such treatments are unavailable. Concomitant Lipid-Lowering Therapy: Atorvastatin may be used with bile acid resins. Monitor for signs of myopathy in patients receiving the combination of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and fibrates [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1), Drug Interactions (7)]. Patients with Renal Impairment: Renal disease does not affect the plasma concentrations nor LDL-C reduction of atorvastatin; thus, dosage adjustment in patients with renal dysfunction is not necessary [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Use with Cyclosporine, Clarithromycin, Itraconazole, or Certain Protease Inhibitors: In patients taking cyclosporine or the HIV protease inhibitors (tipranavir plus ritonavir) or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor (telaprevir), avoid therapy with atorvastatin. In patients with HIV taking lopinavir plus ritonavir, use the lowest necessary dose of atorvastatin. In patients taking clarithromycin, itraconazole, or in patients with HIV taking a combination of saquinavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, or fosamprenavir plus ritonavir, limit therapy with atorvastatin to 20 mg, and make appropriate clinical assessment to ensure that the lowest dose necessary of atorvastatin is employed. In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor boceprevir, limit therapy with atorvastatin to 40 mg, and make appropriate clinical assessment to ensure that the lowest dose necessary of atorvastatin is employed [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1), Drug Interactions (7)]. Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia in Pediatric Patients (10–17 years of age): The recommended starting dose of atorvastatin is 10 mg/day; the maximum recommended dose is 20 mg/day (doses greater than 20 mg have not been studied in this patient population). Doses should be individualized according to the recommended goal of therapy [see current NCEP Pediatric Panel Guidelines 1, References (15), Clinical Pharmacology (12), and Indications and Usage (1.4)]. Adjustments should be made at intervals of 4 weeks or more.
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS Hepatic Impairment: Plasma concentrations of atorvastatin markedly increased in patients with active liver disease (8.6, 12.3). Females of reproductive potential: Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with CADUET (8.3). 8.1 Pregnancy Risk Summary CADUET is contraindicated in women who are pregnant. Atorvastatin Atorvastatin is contraindicated for use in pregnant women since safety in pregnant women has not been established and there is no apparent benefit of lipid lowering drugs during pregnancy. Because HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors decrease cholesterol synthesis and possibly the synthesis of other biologically active substances derived from cholesterol, atorvastatin may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. CADUET should be discontinued as soon as pregnancy is recognized [see Contraindications (4)]. Limited published data on the use of atorvastatin are insufficient to determine a drug-associated risk of major congenital malformations or miscarriage. In animal reproduction studies in rats and rabbits there was no evidence of embryo-fetal toxicity or congenital malformations at doses up to 30 and 20 times, respectively, the human exposure at the MRHD of 80 mg, based on body surface area (mg/m2). In rats administered atorvastatin during gestation and lactation, decreased postnatal growth and development was observed at doses ≥6 times the MRHD (see Data ). Amlodipine The limited available data based on post-marketing reports with amlodipine use in pregnant women are not sufficient to inform a drug-associated risk for major birth defects and miscarriage. There are risks to the mother and fetus associated with poorly controlled hypertension in pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations ). In animal reproduction studies, there was no evidence of adverse developmental effects when pregnant rats and rabbits were treated orally with amlodipine maleate during organogenesis at doses approximately 10 and 20-times MRHD, respectively. However for rats, litter size was significantly decreased (by about 50%) and the number of intrauterine deaths was significantly increased (about 5-fold). Amlodipine has been shown to prolong both the gestation period and the duration of labor in rats at this dose (see Data ). The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively. Clinical Considerations Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk Hypertension in pregnancy increases the maternal risk for pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, premature delivery, and delivery complications (e.g., need for cesarean section and post-partum hemorrhage). Hypertension increases the fetal risk for intrauterine growth restriction and intrauterine death. Pregnant women with hypertension should be carefully monitored and managed accordingly. Data Human Data Atorvastatin Limited published data on atorvastatin calcium from observational studies, meta-analyses and case reports have not shown an increased risk of major congenital malformations or miscarriage. Rare reports of congenital anomalies have been received following intrauterine exposure to other HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. In a review of approximately 100 prospectively followed pregnancies in women exposed to simvastatin or lovastatin, the incidences of congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortions, and fetal deaths/stillbirths did not exceed what would be expected in the general population. The number of cases is adequate to exclude a ≥3 to 4-fold increase in congenital anomalies over the background incidence. In 89% of the prospectively followed pregnancies, drug treatment was initiated prior to pregnancy and was discontinued at some point in the first trimester when pregnancy was identified. Animal Data Atorvastatin Atorvastatin crosses the rat placenta and reaches a level in fetal liver equivalent to that of maternal plasma. When administered to pregnant rats and rabbits during organogenesis at oral doses up to 300 mg/kg/day and 100 mg/kg/day, respectively, atorvastatin was not teratogenic in rats at doses up to 300 mg/kg/day or in rabbits at doses up to 100 mg/kg/day. These doses resulted in multiples of about 30 times (rat) or 20 times (rabbit) the human exposure at the MRHD based on surface area (mg/m2). In rats, the maternally toxic dose of 300 mg/kg resulted in increased post-implantation loss and decreased fetal body weight. At the maternally toxic doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg/day in rabbits, there was increased post-implantation loss, and at 100 mg/kg/day fetal body weights were decreased. In a study in pregnant rats administered atorvastatin calcium at doses equivalent to 20, 100, or 225 mg/kg/day, from gestation day 7 through to lactation day 20 (weaning), there was decreased survival at birth, postnatal day 4, weaning, and post-weaning in pups of mothers dosed with 225 mg/kg/day, a dose at which maternal toxicity was observed. Pup body weight was decreased through postnatal day 21 at 100 mg/kg/day, and through postnatal day 91 at 225 mg/kg/day. Pup development was delayed (rotorod performance at 100 mg/kg/day and acoustic startle at 225 mg/kg/day; pinnae detachment and eye-opening at 225 mg/kg/day). These doses of atorvastatin correspond to 6 times (100 mg/kg) and 22 times (225 mg/kg) the human exposure at the MRHD, based on AUC. Amlodipine No evidence of teratogenicity or other embryo/fetal toxicity was found when pregnant rats and rabbits were treated orally with amlodipine maleate at doses up to 10 mg amlodipine/kg/day (approximately 10 and 20 times the MRHD based on body surface area, respectively) during their respective periods of major organogenesis. However, for rats, litter size was significantly decreased (by about 50%) and the number of intrauterine deaths was significantly increased (about 5-fold) in rats receiving amlodipine maleate at a dose equivalent to 10 mg amlodipine/kg/day for 14 days before mating and throughout mating and gestation. Amlodipine maleate has been shown to prolong both the gestation period and the duration of labor in rats at this dose. 8.2 Lactation Risk Summary CADUET is contraindicated during breastfeeding. Atorvastatin Atorvastatin use is contraindicated during breastfeeding [see Contraindications (4)]. There is no available information on the effects of the drug on the breastfed infant or the effects of the drug on milk production. It is not known whether atorvastatin is present in human milk, but it has been shown that another drug in this class passes into human milk and atorvastatin is present in rat milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed infant, advise women that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment with CADUET. Amlodipine Limited available data from a published clinical lactation study reports that amlodipine is present in human milk at an estimated median relative infant dose of 4.2%. No adverse effects of amlodipine on the breastfed infant have been observed. There is no available information on the effects of amlodipine on milk production. 8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential Contraception Atorvastatin may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with CADUET [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)]. 8.4 Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of CADUET have not been established in pediatric populations. Amlodipine Amlodipine (2.5 to 5 mg daily) is effective in lowering blood pressure in patients 6 to 17 years [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The effect of amlodipine on blood pressure in patients less than 6 years of age is not known. Atorvastatin Safety and effectiveness in patients 10–17 years of age with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia have been evaluated in a controlled clinical trial of 6 months' duration in adolescent boys and postmenarchal girls. Patients treated with atorvastatin had an adverse experience profile generally similar to that of patients treated with placebo. The most common adverse experiences observed in both groups, regardless of causality assessment, were infections. Doses greater than 20 mg have not been studied in this patient population. In this limited controlled study, there was no significant effect on growth or sexual maturation in boys or on menstrual cycle length in girls [see Clinical Studies (14.11), Adverse Reactions (6.1), and Dosage and Administration (2)]. Adolescent females should be counseled on appropriate contraceptive methods while on atorvastatin therapy [see Contraindications (4) and Use in Specific Populations (8.1)]. Atorvastatin has not been studied in controlled clinical trials involving pre-pubertal patients or patients younger than 10 years of age. Clinical efficacy with doses of atorvastatin up to 80 mg/day for 1 year have been evaluated in an uncontrolled study of patients with homozygous FH including 8 pediatric patients [see Clinical Studies (14.10)]. 8.5 Geriatric Use Safety and effectiveness of CADUET have not been established in geriatric populations. Amlodipine Clinical studies of amlodipine did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Elderly patients have decreased clearance of amlodipine with a resulting increase of AUC of approximately 40–60%, and a lower initial dose may be required [see Dosage and Administration (2)]. Atorvastatin Of the 39,828 patients who received atorvastatin in clinical studies, 15,813 (40%) were ≥ 65 years old and 2,800 (7%) were ≥ 75 years old. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older adults cannot be ruled out. Advanced age (≥ 65 years) is a predisposing factor for myopathy. 8.6 Hepatic Impairment CADUET is contraindicated in patients with active liver disease which may include unexplained persistent elevations in hepatic transaminase levels [see Contraindications (4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Data from a drug-drug interaction study involving 10 mg of amlodipine and 80 mg of atorvastatin in healthy subjects indicate that the pharmacokinetics of amlodipine are not altered when the drugs are co-administered. The effect of amlodipine on the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin showed no effect on the Cmax: 91% (90% confidence interval: 80 to 103%), but the AUC of atorvastatin increased by 18% (90% confidence interval: 109 to 127%) in the presence of amlodipine, which is not clinically meaningful. No drug interaction studies have been conducted with CADUET and other drugs, although studies have been conducted in the individual amlodipine and atorvastatin components, as described below: Amlodipine Increased Risk of Myopathy/Rhabdomyolysis (2, 5.1, 7, 12.3) Cyclosporine, HIV protease inhibitors (tipranavir plus ritonavir), hepatitis C protease inhibitor (telaprevir) Avoid atorvastatin Lopinavir plus ritonavir Use lowest dose necessary Clarithromycin, itraconazole, HIV protease inhibitors (saquinavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, fosamprenavir plus ritonavir) Do not exceed 20 mg atorvastatin daily HIV protease inhibitor (nelfinavir) Hepatitis C protease inhibitor (boceprevir) Do not exceed 40 mg atorvastatin daily Other Lipid-Lowering Medications: Increased risk of myopathy (7). Rifampin: Take at same time as CADUET (7.9). Digoxin: Monitor digoxin levels (7.10). Oral Contraceptives: Norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol may be increased (7.11). 7.1 Impact of Other Drugs on Amlodipine CYP3A Inhibitors Co-administration with CYP3A inhibitors (moderate and strong) results in increased systemic exposure to amlodipine and may require dose reduction. Monitor for symptoms of hypotension and edema when amlodipine is co-administered with CYP3A inhibitors to determine the need for dose adjustment [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. CYP3A Inducers No information is available on the quantitative effects of CYP3A inducers on amlodipine. Blood pressure should be closely monitored when amlodipine is co-administered with CYP3A inducers. Sildenafil Monitor for hypotension when sildenafil is co-administered with amlodipine [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)]. 7.2 Impact of Amlodipine on Other Drugs Immunosuppressants Amlodipine may increase the systemic exposure of cyclosporine or tacrolimus when co-administered. Frequent monitoring of trough blood levels of cyclosporine and tacrolimus is recommended and adjust the dose when appropriate [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Atorvastatin The risk of myopathy during treatment with statins is increased with concurrent administration of fibric acid derivatives, lipid-modifying doses of niacin, cyclosporine, or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., clarithromycin, HIV protease inhibitors, and itraconazole) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. 7.3 Strong Inhibitors of CYP3A4 Atorvastatin is metabolized by CYP3A4. Concomitant administration of atorvastatin with strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 can lead to increases in plasma concentrations of atorvastatin. The extent of interaction and potentiation of effects depend on the variability of effect on CYP3A4. Clarithromycin: Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin 80 mg with clarithromycin (500 mg twice daily) compared to that of atorvastatin alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Therefore, in patients taking clarithromycin, avoid atorvastatin doses >20 mg [see Dosage and Administration (2) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. Combination of Protease Inhibitors: Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin with several combinations of HIV protease inhibitors, as well as with the hepatitis C protease inhibitor telaprevir, compared to that of atorvastatin alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Therefore, in patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor tipranavir plus ritonavir, or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor telaprevir, concomitant use of atorvastatin should be avoided. In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir plus ritonavir, caution should be used when prescribing atorvastatin and the lowest dose necessary should be used. In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitors saquinavir plus ritonavir, darunavir plus ritonavir, fosamprenavir, or fosamprenavir plus ritonavir, the dose of atorvastatin should not exceed 20 mg [see Dosage and Administration (2) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ]. In patients taking the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the hepatitis C protease inhibitor boceprevir, the dose of atorvastatin should not exceed 40 mg and close clinical monitoring is recommended. Itraconazole : Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin 40 mg and itraconazole 200 mg [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Therefore, in patients taking itraconazole, avoid atorvastatin doses >20 mg [see Dosage and Administration (2) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. 7.4 Grapefruit Juice Contains one or more components that inhibit CYP3A4 and can increase plasma concentrations of atorvastatin, especially with excessive grapefruit juice consumption (> 1.2 liters per day). 7.5 Cyclosporine Atorvastatin and atorvastatin-metabolites are substrates of the OATP1B1 transporter. Inhibitors of the OATP1B1 (e.g., cyclosporine) can increase the bioavailability of atorvastatin. Atorvastatin AUC was significantly increased with concomitant administration of atorvastatin 10 mg and cyclosporine 5.2 mg/kg/day compared to that of atorvastatin alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. The co-administration of atorvastatin with cyclosporine should be avoided [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. 7.6 Gemfibrozil Because of an increased risk of myopathy/rhabdomyolysis when HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are co-administered with gemfibrozil, avoid concomitant administration of atorvastatin with gemfibrozil [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. 7.7 Other Fibrates The risk of myopathy during treatment with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors is increased with concurrent administration of other fibrates [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. 7.8 Niacin The risk of skeletal muscle effects may be enhanced when atorvastatin is used in combination with niacin; consider a reduction in atorvastatin dosage in this setting [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. 7.9 Rifampin or other Inducers of CYP3A4 Concomitant administration of atorvastatin with inducers of CYP3A4 (e.g., efavirenz, rifampin) can lead to variable reductions in plasma concentrations of atorvastatin. Because of the dual interaction mechanism of rifampin, simultaneous co-administration of atorvastatin with rifampin is recommended, as delayed administration of atorvastatin after administration of rifampin has been associated with a significant reduction in atorvastatin plasma concentrations. 7.10 Digoxin When multiple doses of atorvastatin and digoxin were co-administered, steady-state plasma digoxin concentrations increased by approximately 20%. Monitor digoxin levels. 7.11 Oral Contraceptives Co-administration of atorvastatin and an oral contraceptive increased AUC values for norethindrone and ethinyl estradiol [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Consider these increases when selecting an oral contraceptive for a woman taking CADUET. 7.12 Warfarin Atorvastatin had no clinically significant effect on prothrombin time when administered to patients receiving chronic warfarin treatment. 7.13 Colchicine Cases of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis, have been reported with atorvastatin co-administered with colchicine.

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA021540
Agency product number 864V2Q084H
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 0069-2170,0069-2160,0069-2250,0069-2190,0069-2180,0069-2150,0069-2260,0069-2980,0069-2970,0069-2960,0069-2270
Date Last Revised 13-06-2018
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 750207
Storage and handling Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15–30°C (59–86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].
Marketing authorisation holder Pfizer Laboratories Div Pfizer Inc