Data from FDA - Curated by Toby Galbraith - Last updated 23 March 2017

Indication(s)

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE ABILIFY Oral Tablets, Orally-Disintegrating Tablets, and Oral Solution are indicated for the treatment of: •Schizophrenia [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.1)] •Acute Treatment of Manic and Mixed Episodes associated with Bipolar I Disorder [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.2)] •Adjunctive Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.3)] •Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.4)] •Treatment of Tourette’s Disorder [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.5)] ABILIFY Injection is indicated for the treatment of: •Agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.6)] ABILIFY is an atypical antipsychotic. The oral formulations are indicated for: •Schizophrenia (14.1) •Acute Treatment of Manic and Mixed Episodes associated with Bipolar I (14.2) •Adjunctive Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (14.3) •Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder (14.4) •Treatment of Tourette’s disorder (14.5) The injection is indicated for: •Agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania (14.6)

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Advisory information

contraindications
4 CONTRAINDICATIONS ABILIFY is contraindicated in patients with a history of a hypersensitivity reaction to aripiprazole. Reactions have ranged from pruritus/urticaria to anaphylaxis [see ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.2) ]. •Known hypersensitivity to ABILIFY (4)
Adverse reactions
6 ADVERSE REACTIONS Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The following adverse reactions are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling: •Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis [see BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1)] •Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, Including Stroke [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.2)] •Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults [see BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.3)] •Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.4)] •Tardive Dyskinesia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.5) ] •Metabolic Changes [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.6) ] •Pathological Gambling and Other Compulsive Behaviors [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.7) ] •Orthostatic Hypotension [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.8) ] •Falls [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.9)] •Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.10)] •Seizures/Convulsions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.11)] •Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.12)] •Body Temperature Regulation [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.13)] •Suicide [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.14)] •Dysphagia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.15)] The most common adverse reactions in adult patients in clinical trials (≥10%) were nausea, vomiting, constipation, headache, dizziness, akathisia, anxiety, insomnia, and restlessness. The most common adverse reactions in the pediatric clinical trials (≥10%) were somnolence, headache, vomiting, extrapyramidal disorder, fatigue, increased appetite, insomnia, nausea, nasopharyngitis, and weight increased. ABILIFY has been evaluated for safety in 13,543 adult patients who participated in multiple-dose, clinical trials in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, Dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, Parkinson’s disease, and alcoholism, and who had approximately 7619 patient-years of exposure to oral ABILIFY and 749 patients with exposure to ABILIFY injection. A total of 3390 patients were treated with oral ABILIFY for at least 180 days and 1933 patients treated with oral ABILIFY had at least 1 year of exposure. ABILIFY has been evaluated for safety in 1,686 patients (6 to 18 years) who participated in multiple-dose, clinical trials in schizophrenia, bipolar mania, autistic disorder, or Tourette’s disorder and who had approximately 1,342 patient-years of exposure to oral ABILIFY. A total of 959 pediatric patients were treated with oral ABILIFY for at least 180 days and 556 pediatric patients treated with oral ABILIFY had at least 1 year of exposure. The conditions and duration of treatment with ABILIFY (monotherapy and adjunctive therapy with antidepressants or mood stabilizers) included (in overlapping categories) double-blind, comparative and noncomparative open-label studies, inpatient and outpatient studies, fixed- and flexible-dose studies, and short- and longer-term exposure. Commonly observed adverse reactions (incidence ≥5% and at least twice that for placebo) were (6.1): •Adult patients with schizophrenia: akathisia •Pediatric patients (13 to 17 years) with schizophrenia: extrapyramidal disorder, somnolence, and tremor •Adult patients (monotherapy) with bipolar mania: akathisia, sedation, restlessness, tremor, and extrapyramidal disorder •Adult patients (adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate) with bipolar mania: akathisia, insomnia, and extrapyramidal disorder •Pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) with bipolar mania: somnolence, extrapyramidal disorder, fatigue, nausea, akathisia, blurred vision, salivary hypersecretion, and dizziness •Adult patients with major depressive disorder (adjunctive treatment to antidepressant therapy): akathisia, restlessness, insomnia, constipation, fatigue, and blurred vision •Pediatric patients (6 to 17 years) with autistic disorder: sedation, fatigue, vomiting, somnolence, tremor, pyrexia, drooling, decreased appetite, salivary hypersecretion, extrapyramidal disorder, and lethargy •Pediatric patients (6 to 18 years) with Tourette’s disorder: sedation, somnolence, nausea, headache, nasopharyngitis, fatigue, increased appetite •Adult patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania: nausea To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Bristol-Myers Squibb at 1-800-721-5072 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Adult Patients with Schizophrenia The following findings are based on a pool of five placebo-controlled trials (four 4-week and one 6-week) in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses ranging from 2 to 30 mg/day. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions The only commonly observed adverse reaction associated with the use of ABILIFY in patients with schizophrenia (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) was akathisia (ABILIFY 8%; placebo 4%). Adult Patients with Bipolar Mania Monotherapy The following findings are based on a pool of 3-week, placebo-controlled, bipolar mania trials in which oral ABILIFY was administered at doses of 15 or 30 mg/day. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in patients with bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 16. Table 16: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Adult Patients with Bipolar Mania Treated with Oral ABILIFY Monotherapy Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction ABILIFY Placebo Preferred Term (n=917) (n=753) Akathisia 13 4 Sedation 8 3 Restlessness 6 3 Tremor 6 3 Extrapyramidal Disorder 5 2 Less Common Adverse Reactions in Adults Table 17 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in schizophrenia and up to 3 weeks in bipolar mania), including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with ABILIFY (doses ≥2 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with ABILIFY was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo in the combined dataset. Table 17: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials in Adult Patients Treated with Oral ABILIFY Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona System Organ Class ABILIFY Placebo Preferred Term (n=1843) (n=1166) Eye Disorders Blurred Vision 3 1 Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 15 11 Constipation 11 7 Vomiting 11 6 Dyspepsia 9 7 Dry Mouth 5 4 Toothache 4 3 Abdominal Discomfort 3 2 Stomach Discomfort 3 2 General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions Fatigue 6 4 Pain 3 2 Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders Musculoskeletal Stiffness 4 3 Pain in Extremity 4 2 Myalgia 2 1 Muscle Spasms 2 1 Nervous System Disorders Headache 27 23 Dizziness 10 7 Akathisia 10 4 Sedation 7 4 Extrapyramidal Disorder 5 3 Tremor 5 3 Somnolence 5 3 Psychiatric Disorders Agitation 19 17 Insomnia 18 13 Anxiety 17 13 Restlessness 5 3 Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders Pharyngolaryngeal Pain 3 2 Cough 3 2 a Adverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with oral ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo. An examination of population subgroups did not reveal any clear evidence of differential adverse reaction incidence on the basis of age, gender, or race. Adult Patients with Adjunctive Therapy with Bipolar Mania The following findings are based on a placebo-controlled trial of adult patients with bipolar disorder in which ABILIFY was administered at doses of 15 or 30 mg/day as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment In a study of patients who were already tolerating either lithium or valproate as monotherapy, discontinuation rates due to adverse reactions were 12% for patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY compared to 6% for patients treated with adjunctive placebo. The most common adverse drug reactions associated with discontinuation in the adjunctive ABILIFY-treated compared to placebo-treated patients were akathisia (5% and 1%, respectively) and tremor (2% and 1%, respectively). Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions The commonly observed adverse reactions associated with adjunctive ABILIFY and lithium or valproate in patients with bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and incidence at least twice that for adjunctive placebo) were: akathisia, insomnia, and extrapyramidal disorder. Less Common Adverse Reactions in Adult Patients with Adjunctive Therapy in Bipolar Mania Table 18 enumerates the incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute treatment (up to 6 weeks), including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY (doses of 15 or 30 mg/day) and lithium or valproate and for which the incidence in patients treated with this combination was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo plus lithium or valproate. Table 18: Adverse Reactions in a Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Adjunctive Therapy in Patients with Bipolar Disorder Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona System Organ Class ABILIFY + Li or Val* Placebo + Li or Val* Preferred Term (n=253) (n=130) Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 8 5 Vomiting 4 0 Salivary Hypersecretion 4 2 Dry Mouth 2 1 Infections and Infestations Nasopharyngitis 3 2 Investigations Weight Increased 2 1 Nervous System Disorders Akathisia 19 5 Tremor 9 6 Extrapyramidal Disorder 5 1 Dizziness 4 1 Sedation 4 2 Psychiatric Disorders Insomnia 8 4 Anxiety 4 1 Restlessness 2 1 aAdverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with oral ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo. * Lithium or Valproate Pediatric Patients (13 to 17 years) with Schizophrenia The following findings are based on one 6-week, placebo-controlled trial in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses ranging from 2 to 30 mg/day. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (13 to 17 years) was 5% and 2%, respectively. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in adolescent patients with schizophrenia (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) were extrapyramidal disorder, somnolence, and tremor. Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) with Bipolar Mania The following findings are based on one 4-week, placebo-controlled trial in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses of 10 or 30 mg/day. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) was 7% and 2%, respectively. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in pediatric patients with bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 19. Table 19: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients (10 to 17 years) with Bipolar Mania Treated with Oral ABILIFY Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction ABILIFY Placebo Preferred Term (n=197) (n=97) Somnolence 23 3 Extrapyramidal Disorder 20 3 Fatigue 11 4 Nausea 11 4 Akathisia 10 2 Blurred Vision 8 0 Salivary Hypersecretion 6 0 Dizziness 5 1 Pediatric Patients (6 to 17 years) with Autistic Disorder The following findings are based on two 8-week, placebo-controlled trials in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses of 2 to 15 mg/day. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (6 to 17 years) was 10% and 8%, respectively. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in pediatric patients with autistic disorder (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 20. Table 20: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients (6 to 17 years) with Autistic Disorder Treated with Oral ABILIFY Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction ABILIFY Placebo Preferred Term (n=212) (n=101) Sedation 21 4 Fatigue 17 2 Vomiting 14 7 Somnolence 10 4 Tremor 10 0 Pyrexia 9 1 Drooling 9 0 Decreased Appetite 7 2 Salivary Hypersecretion 6 1 Extrapyramidal Disorder 6 0 Lethargy 5 0 Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) with Tourette's Disorder The following findings are based on one 8-week and one 10-week, placebo-controlled trials in which oral ABILIFY was administered in doses of 2 to 20 mg/day. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions between ABILIFY-treated and placebo-treated pediatric patients (6 to 18 years) was 7% and 1%, respectively. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions Commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of ABILIFY in pediatric patients with Tourette's disorder (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) are shown in Table 21. Table 21: Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) with Tourette's Disorder Treated with Oral ABILIFY Percentage of Patients Reporting Reaction ABILIFY Placebo Preferred Term (n=121) (n=72) Sedation 13 6 Somnolence 13 1 Nausea 11 4 Headache 10 3 Nasopharyngitis 9 0 Fatigue 8 0 Increased Appetite 7 1 Less Common Adverse Reactions in Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) with Schizophrenia, Bipolar Mania, Autistic Disorder, or Tourette’s Disorder Table 22 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks in schizophrenia, up to 4 weeks in bipolar mania, up to 8 weeks in autistic disorder, and up to 10 weeks in Tourette’s disorder), including only those reactions that occurred in 2% or more of pediatric patients treated with ABILIFY (doses ≥2 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with ABILIFY was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo. Table 22: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials of Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) Treated with Oral ABILIFY Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona System Organ Class ABILIFY Placebo Preferred Term (n=732) (n=370) Eye Disorders Blurred Vision 3 0 Gastrointestinal Disorders Abdominal Discomfort 2 1 Vomiting 8 7 Nausea 8 4 Diarrhea 4 3 Salivary Hypersecretion 4 1 Abdominal Pain Upper 3 2 Constipation 2 2 General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions Fatigue 10 2 Pyrexia 4 1 Irritability 2 1 Asthenia 2 1 Infections and Infestations Nasopharyngitis 6 3 Investigations Weight Increased 3 1 Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders Increased Appetite 7 3 Decreased Appetite 5 4 Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders Musculoskeletal Stiffness 2 1 Muscle Rigidity 2 1 Nervous System Disorders Somnolence 16 4 Headache 12 10 Sedation 9 2 Tremor 9 1 Extrapyramidal Disorder 6 1 Akathisia 6 4 Drooling 3 0 Lethargy 3 0 Dizziness 3 2 Dystonia 2 1 Respiratory, Thoracic, and Mediastinal Disorders Epistaxis 2 1 Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders Rash 2 1 aAdverse reactions reported by at least 2% of pediatric patients treated with oral ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo. Adult Patients Receiving ABILIFY as Adjunctive Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder The following findings are based on a pool of two placebo-controlled trials of patients with major depressive disorder in which ABILIFY was administered at doses of 2 mg to 20 mg as adjunctive treatment to continued antidepressant therapy. Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment The incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions was 6% for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients and 2% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions The commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of adjunctive ABILIFY in patients with major depressive disorder (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo) were: akathisia, restlessness, insomnia, constipation, fatigue, and blurred vision. Less Common Adverse Reactions in Adult Patients with Major Depressive Disorder Table 23 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (up to 6 weeks), including only those adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY (doses ≥2 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY was greater than the incidence in patients treated with adjunctive placebo in the combined dataset. Table 23: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Adjunctive Trials in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona System Organ Class ABILIFY + ADT* Placebo + ADT* Preferred Term (n=371) (n=366) Eye Disorders Blurred Vision 6 1 Gastrointestinal Disorders Constipation 5 2 General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions Fatigue 8 4 Feeling Jittery 3 1 Infections and Infestations Upper Respiratory Tract Infection 6 4 Investigations Weight Increased 3 2 Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders Increased Appetite 3 2 Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders Arthralgia 4 3 Myalgia 3 1 Nervous System Disorders Akathisia 25 4 Somnolence 6 4 Tremor 5 4 Sedation 4 2 Dizziness 4 2 Disturbance in Attention 3 1 Extrapyramidal Disorder 2 0 Psychiatric Disorders Restlessness 12 2 Insomnia 8 2 aAdverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with adjunctive ABILIFY, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo. * Antidepressant Therapy Patients with Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Mania (Intramuscular Injection) The following findings are based on a pool of three placebo-controlled trials of patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania in which ABILIFY injection was administered at doses of 5.25 mg to 15 mg. Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions There was one commonly observed adverse reaction (nausea) associated with the use of ABILIFY injection in patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia and bipolar mania (incidence of 5% or greater and ABILIFY incidence at least twice that for placebo). Less Common Adverse Reactions in Patients with Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Mania Table 24 enumerates the pooled incidence, rounded to the nearest percent, of adverse reactions that occurred during acute therapy (24-hour), including only those adverse reactions that occurred in 2% or more of patients treated with ABILIFY injection (doses ≥5.25 mg/day) and for which the incidence in patients treated with ABILIFY injection was greater than the incidence in patients treated with placebo in the combined dataset. Table 24: Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials in Patients Treated with ABILIFY Injection Percentage of Patients Reporting Reactiona System Organ Class ABILIFY Placebo Preferred Term (n=501) (n=220) Cardiac Disorders Tachycardia 2 <1 Gastrointestinal Disorders Nausea 9 3 Vomiting 3 1 General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions Fatigue 2 1 Nervous System Disorders Headache 12 7 Dizziness 8 5 Somnolence 7 4 Sedation 3 2 Akathisia 2 0 aAdverse reactions reported by at least 2% of patients treated with ABILIFY injection, except adverse reactions which had an incidence equal to or less than placebo. Dose-Related Adverse Reactions Schizophrenia Dose response relationships for the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events were evaluated from four trials in adult patients with schizophrenia comparing various fixed doses (2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 mg/day) of oral ABILIFY to placebo. This analysis, stratified by study, indicated that the only adverse reaction to have a possible dose response relationship, and then most prominent only with 30 mg, was somnolence [including sedation]; (incidences were placebo, 7.1%; 10 mg, 8.5%; 15 mg, 8.7%; 20 mg, 7.5%; 30 mg, 12.6%). In the study of pediatric patients (13 to 17 years of age) with schizophrenia, three common adverse reactions appeared to have a possible dose response relationship: extrapyramidal disorder (incidences were placebo, 5.0%; 10 mg, 13.0%; 30 mg, 21.6%); somnolence (incidences were placebo, 6.0%; 10 mg, 11.0%; 30 mg, 21.6%); and tremor (incidences were placebo, 2.0%; 10 mg, 2.0%; 30 mg, 11.8%). Bipolar Mania In the study of pediatric patients (10 to 17 years of age) with bipolar mania, four common adverse reactions had a possible dose response relationship at 4 weeks; extrapyramidal disorder (incidences were placebo, 3.1%; 10 mg, 12.2%; 30 mg, 27.3%); somnolence (incidences were placebo, 3.1%; 10 mg, 19.4%; 30 mg, 26.3%); akathisia (incidences were placebo, 2.1%; 10 mg, 8.2%; 30 mg, 11.1%); and salivary hypersecretion (incidences were placebo, 0%; 10 mg, 3.1%; 30 mg, 8.1%). Autistic Disorder In a study of pediatric patients (6 to 17 years of age) with autistic disorder, one common adverse reaction had a possible dose response relationship: fatigue (incidences were placebo, 0%; 5 mg, 3.8%; 10 mg, 22.0%; 15 mg, 18.5%). Tourette’s Disorder In a study of pediatric patients (7 to 17 years of age) with Tourette’s disorder, no common adverse reaction(s) had a dose response relationship. Extrapyramidal Symptoms Schizophrenia In short-term, placebo-controlled trials in schizophrenia in adults, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 13% vs. 12% for placebo; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 8% vs. 4% for placebo. In the short-term, placebo-controlled trial of schizophrenia in pediatric patients (13 to 17 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 25% vs. 7% for placebo; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 9% vs. 6% for placebo. Objectively collected data from those trials was collected on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS), the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia), and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales (for dyskinesias). In the adult schizophrenia trials, the objectively collected data did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo, with the exception of the Barnes Akathisia Scale (ABILIFY, 0.08; placebo, –0.05). In the pediatric (13 to 17 years) schizophrenia trial, the objectively collected data did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo, with the exception of the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (ABILIFY, 0.24; placebo, –0.29). Similarly, in a long-term (26-week), placebo-controlled trial of schizophrenia in adults, objectively collected data on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS), the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia), and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales (for dyskinesias) did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo. Bipolar Mania In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in bipolar mania in adults, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for monotherapy ABILIFY-treated patients was 16% vs. 8% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for monotherapy ABILIFY-treated patients was 13% vs. 4% for placebo. In the 6-week, placebo-controlled trial in bipolar mania for adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 15% vs. 8% for adjunctive placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 19% vs. 5% for adjunctive placebo. In the short-term, placebo-controlled trial in bipolar mania in pediatric (10 to 17 years) patients, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 26% vs. 5% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 10% vs. 2% for placebo. In the adult bipolar mania trials with monotherapy ABILIFY, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.50; placebo, –0.01 and ABILIFY, 0.21; placebo, –0.05). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups. In the bipolar mania trials with ABILIFY as adjunctive therapy with either lithium or valproate, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo (ABILIFY, 0.73; placebo, 0.07 and ABILIFY, 0.30; placebo, 0.11). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo. In the pediatric (10 to 17 years), short-term, bipolar mania trial, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.90; placebo, −0.05). Changes in the Barnes Akathisia Scale and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups. Major Depressive Disorder In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 8% vs. 5% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 25% vs. 4% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients. In the major depressive disorder trials, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo (ABILIFY, 0.31; placebo, 0.03 and ABILIFY, 0.22; placebo, 0.02). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo groups. Autistic Disorder In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in autistic disorder in pediatric patients (6 to 17 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 18% vs. 2% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 3% vs. 9% for placebo. In the pediatric (6 to 17 years) short-term autistic disorder trials, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.1; placebo, –0.4). Changes in the Barnes Akathisia Scale and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups. Tourette’s Disorder In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in Tourette’s disorder in pediatric patients (6 to 18 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 7% vs. 6% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 4% vs. 6% for placebo. In the pediatric (6 to 18 years) short-term Tourette’s disorder trials, changes in the Simpson Angus Rating Scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale and Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scale were not clinically meaningfully different for ABILIFY and placebo. Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Mania In the placebo-controlled trials in patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, the incidence of reported EPS-related events excluding events related to akathisia for ABILIFY-treated patients was 2% vs. 2% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 2% vs. 0% for placebo. Objectively collected data on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS) and the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia) for all treatment groups did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo. Dystonia Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment. Dystonic symptoms include: spasm of the neck muscles, sometimes progressing to tightness of the throat, swallowing difficulty, difficulty breathing, and/or protrusion of the tongue. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, they occur more frequently and with greater severity with high potency and at higher doses of first generation antipsychotic drugs. An elevated risk of acute dystonia is observed in males and younger age groups. Additional Findings Observed in Clinical Trials Adverse Reactions in Long-Term, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials The adverse reactions reported in a 26-week, double-blind trial comparing oral ABILIFY and placebo in patients with schizophrenia were generally consistent with those reported in the short-term, placebo-controlled trials, except for a higher incidence of tremor [8% (12/153) for ABILIFY vs. 2% (3/153) for placebo]. In this study, the majority of the cases of tremor were of mild intensity (8/12 mild and 4/12 moderate), occurred early in therapy (9/12 ≤49 days), and were of limited duration (7/12 ≤10 days). Tremor infrequently led to discontinuation (<1%) of ABILIFY. In addition, in a long-term (52 week), active-controlled study, the incidence of tremor was 5% (40/859) for ABILIFY. A similar profile was observed in a long-term monotherapy study and a long-term adjunctive study with lithium and valproate in bipolar disorder. Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Premarketing Evaluation of ABILIFY The following listing does not include reactions: 1) already listed in previous tables or elsewhere in labeling, 2) for which a drug cause was remote, 3) which were so general as to be uninformative, 4) which were not considered to have significant clinical implications, or 5) which occurred at a rate equal to or less than placebo. Reactions are categorized by body system according to the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients; infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients; rare reactions are those occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients: Adults - Oral Administration Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: rare - thrombocytopenia Cardiac Disorders: infrequent – bradycardia, palpitations, rare – atrial flutter, cardio-respiratory arrest, atrioventricular block, atrial fibrillation, angina pectoris, myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, cardiopulmonary failure Eye Disorders: infrequent – photophobia; rare - diplopia Gastrointestinal Disorders: infrequent - gastroesophageal reflux disease General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: frequent - asthenia; infrequent – peripheral edema, chest pain; rare – face edema Hepatobiliary Disorders: rare - hepatitis, jaundice Immune System Disorders: rare - hypersensitivity Injury, Poisoning, and Procedural Complications: infrequent – fall; rare – heat stroke Investigations: frequent - weight decreased, infrequent - hepatic enzyme increased, blood glucose increased, blood lactate deh

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Dosing and administration
2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Initial Dose Recommended Dose Maximum Dose Schizophrenia – adults (2.1) 10-15 mg/day 10-15 mg/day 30 mg/day Schizophrenia – adolescents (2.1) 2 mg/day 10 mg/day 30 mg/day Bipolar mania – adults: monotherapy (2.2) 15 mg/day 15 mg/day 30 mg/day Bipolar mania – adults: adjunct to lithium or valproate (2.2) 10-15 mg/day 15 mg/day 30 mg/day Bipolar mania – pediatric patients: monotherapy or as an adjunct to lithium or valproate (2.2) 2 mg/day 10 mg/day 30 mg/day Major Depressive Disorder – Adults adjunct to antidepressants (2.3) 2-5 mg/day 5-10 mg/day 15 mg/day Irritability associated with autistic disorder – pediatric patients (2.4) 2 mg/day 5-10 mg/day 15 mg/day Tourette’s disorder – (2.5) Patients < 50 kg 2 mg/day 5 mg/day 10 mg/day Patients ≥ 50 kg 2 mg/day 10 mg/day 20 mg/day Agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania – adults (2.6) 9.75 mg /1.3 mL injected IM 30 mg/day injected IM •Oral formulations: Administer once daily without regard to meals (2) •IM injection: Wait at least 2 hours between doses. Maximum daily dose 30 mg (2.5) •Known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers: Half of the usual dose (2.7) 2.1 Schizophrenia Adults The recommended starting and target dose for ABILIFY is 10 or 15 mg/day administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals. ABILIFY has been systematically evaluated and shown to be effective in a dose range of 10 to 30 mg/day, when administered as the tablet formulation; however, doses higher than 10 or 15 mg/day were not more effective than 10 or 15 mg/day. Dosage increases should generally not be made before 2 weeks, the time needed to achieve steady-state [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.1)]. Maintenance Treatment: Maintenance of efficacy in schizophrenia was demonstrated in a trial involving patients with schizophrenia who had been symptomatically stable on other antipsychotic medications for periods of 3 months or longer. These patients were discontinued from those medications and randomized to either ABILIFY 15 mg/day or placebo, and observed for relapse [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.1)]. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the continued need for maintenance treatment. Adolescents The recommended target dose of ABILIFY is 10 mg/day. Aripiprazole was studied in adolescent patients 13 to 17 years of age with schizophrenia at daily doses of 10 mg and 30 mg. The starting daily dose of the tablet formulation in these patients was 2 mg, which was titrated to 5 mg after 2 days and to the target dose of 10 mg after 2 additional days. Subsequent dose increases should be administered in 5 mg increments. The 30 mg/day dose was not shown to be more efficacious than the 10 mg/day dose. ABILIFY can be administered without regard to meals [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.1)]. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment. Switching from Other Antipsychotics There are no systematically collected data to specifically address switching patients with schizophrenia from other antipsychotics to ABILIFY or concerning concomitant administration with other antipsychotics. While immediate discontinuation of the previous antipsychotic treatment may be acceptable for some patients with schizophrenia, more gradual discontinuation may be most appropriate for others. In all cases, the period of overlapping antipsychotic administration should be minimized. 2.2 Bipolar I Disorder Acute Treatment of Manic and Mixed Episodes Adults: The recommended starting dose in adults is 15 mg given once daily as monotherapy and 10 mg to 15 mg given once daily as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate. ABILIFY can be given without regard to meals. The recommended target dose of ABILIFY is 15 mg/day, as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate. The dose may be increased to 30 mg/day based on clinical response. The safety of doses above 30 mg/day has not been evaluated in clinical trials. Pediatrics: The recommended starting dose in pediatric patients (10 to 17 years) as monotherapy is 2 mg/day, with titration to 5 mg/day after 2 days, and a target dose of 10 mg/day after 2 additional days. Recommended dosing as adjunctive therapy to lithium or valproate is the same. Subsequent dose increases, if needed, should be administered in 5 mg/day increments. ABILIFY can be given without regard to meals [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.2)]. 2.3 Adjunctive Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder Adults The recommended starting dose for ABILIFY as adjunctive treatment for patients already taking an antidepressant is 2 to 5 mg/day. The recommended dosage range is 2 to 15 mg/day. Dosage adjustments of up to 5 mg/day should occur gradually, at intervals of no less than 1 week [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.3)]. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the continued need for maintenance treatment. 2.4 Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder Pediatric Patients (6 to 17 years) The recommended dosage range for the treatment of pediatric patients with irritability associated with autistic disorder is 5 to 15 mg/day. Dosing should be initiated at 2 mg/day. The dose should be increased to 5 mg/day, with subsequent increases to 10 or 15 mg/day if needed. Dose adjustments of up to 5 mg/day should occur gradually, at intervals of no less than 1 week [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.4) ]. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the continued need for maintenance treatment. 2.5 Tourette’s Disorder Pediatric Patients (6 to 18 years) The recommended dosage range for Tourette’s Disorder is 5 to 20 mg/day. For patients weighing less than 50 kg, dosing should be initiated at 2 mg/day with a target dose of 5 mg/day after 2 days. The dose can be increased to 10 mg/day in patients who do not achieve optimal control of tics. Dosage adjustments should occur gradually at intervals of no less than 1 week. For patients weighing 50 kg or more, dosing should be initiated at 2 mg/day for 2 days, and then increased to 5 mg/day for 5 days, with a target dose of 10 mg/day on day 8. The dose can be increased up to 20 mg/day for patients who do not achieve optimal control of tics. Dosage adjustments should occur gradually in increments of 5 mg/day at intervals of no less than 1 week. [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.5)]. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the continued need for maintenance treatment. 2.6 Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Mania (Intramuscular Injection) Adults The recommended dose in these patients is 9.75 mg. The recommended dosage range is 5.25 to 15 mg. No additional benefit was demonstrated for 15 mg compared to 9.75 mg. A lower dose of 5.25 mg may be considered when clinical factors warrant. If agitation warranting a second dose persists following the initial dose, cumulative doses up to a total of 30 mg/day may be given. However, the efficacy of repeated doses of ABILIFY injection in agitated patients has not been systematically evaluated in controlled clinical trials. The safety of total daily doses greater than 30 mg or injections given more frequently than every 2 hours have not been adequately evaluated in clinical trials [see CLINICAL STUDIES (14.6) ]. If ongoing ABILIFY therapy is clinically indicated, oral ABILIFY in a range of 10 to 30 mg/day should replace ABILIFY injection as soon as possible [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.1 and 2.2)]. Administration of ABILIFY Injection To administer ABILIFY Injection, draw up the required volume of solution into the syringe as shown in Table 1. Discard any unused portion. Table 1: ABILIFY Injection Dosing Recommendations Single-Dose Required Volume of Solution 5.25 mg 0.7 mL 9.75 mg 1.3 mL 15 mg 2 mL ABILIFY Injection is intended for intramuscular use only. Do not administer intravenously or subcutaneously. Inject slowly, deep into the muscle mass. Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit. 2.7 Dosage Adjustments for Cytochrome P450 Considerations Dosage adjustments are recommended in patients who are known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers and in patients taking concomitant CYP3A4 inhibitors or CYP2D6 inhibitors or strong CYP3A4 inducers (see Table 2). When the coadministered drug is withdrawn from the combination therapy, ABILIFY dosage should then be adjusted to its original level. When the coadministered CYP3A4 inducer is withdrawn, ABILIFY dosage should be reduced to the original level over 1 to 2 weeks. Patients who may be receiving a combination of strong, moderate, and weak inhibitors of CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 (e.g., a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor and a moderate CYP2D6 inhibitor or a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor with a moderate CYP2D6 inhibitor), the dosing may be reduced to one-quarter (25%) of the usual dose initially and then adjusted to achieve a favorable clinical response. Table 2: Dose Adjustments for ABILIFY in Patients who are known CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers and Patients Taking Concomitant CYP2D6 Inhibitors, 3A4 Inhibitors, and/or CYP3A4 Inducers Factors Dosage Adjustments for ABILIFY Known CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers Administer half of usual dose Known CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers taking concomitant strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., itraconazole, clarithromycin) Administer a quarter of usual dose Strong CYP2D6 (e.g., quinidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine) or CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., itraconazole, clarithromycin) Administer half of usual dose Strong CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibitors Administer a quarter of usual dose Strong CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, rifampin) Double usual dose over 1 to 2 weeks When adjunctive ABILIFY is administered to patients with major depressive disorder, ABILIFY should be administered without dosage adjustment as specified in DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.3) . 2.8 Dosing of Oral Solution The oral solution can be substituted for tablets on a mg-per-mg basis up to the 25 mg dose level. Patients receiving 30 mg tablets should receive 25 mg of the solution [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)]. 2.9 Dosing of Orally Disintegrating Tablets The dosing for ABILIFY Orally Disintegrating Tablets is the same as for the oral tablets [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4)].
Use in special populations
8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS • Pregnancy: May cause extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms in neonates with third trimester exposure (8.1) • Nursing Mothers: Discontinue drug or nursing, taking into consideration importance of drug to the mother (8.3) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C Pregnancy Exposure Registry There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to ABILIFY during pregnancy. For more information contact the National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics at 1-866-961-2388 or visit http://womensmentalhealth.org/clinical-and-research-programs/pregnancyregistry/. Risk Summary Neonates exposed to antipsychotic drugs (including ABILIFY) during the third trimester of pregnancy are at risk for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms. Adequate and well controlled studies with ABILIFY have not been conducted in pregnant women. Animal reproduction studies were conducted with aripiprazole in rats and rabbits during organogenesis, and in rats during the pre-and post-natal period. Oral and intravenous aripiprazole administration during organogenesis in rats and/or rabbits at doses higher than the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) produced fetal death, decreased fetal weight, undescended testicles, delayed skeletal ossification, skeletal abnormalities, and diaphragmatic hernia. Oral and intravenous aripiprazole administration during the pre- and post-natal period in rats at doses higher than the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) produced prolonged gestation, stillbirths, decreased pup weight, and decreased pup survival. Administer ABILIFY during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Clinical Considerations Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reactions Extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms, including agitation, hypertonia, hypotonia, tremor, somnolence, respiratory distress and feeding disorder have been reported in neonates who were exposed to antipsychotic drugs (including ABILIFY) during the third trimester of pregnancy. These symptoms have varied in severity. Some neonates recovered within hours or days without specific treatment; others required prolonged hospitalization. Monitor neonates for extrapyramidal and/or withdrawal symptoms. Data Animal Data In animal studies, aripiprazole demonstrated developmental toxicity, including possible teratogenic effects in rats and rabbits. Pregnant rats were treated with oral doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day (1, 3, and 10 times the maximum recommended human dose [MRHD] on a mg/m2 basis) of aripiprazole during the period of organogenesis. Gestation was slightly prolonged at 30 mg/kg/day. Treatment at the high dose of 30 mg/kg/day caused a slight delay in fetal development (decreased fetal weight), undescended testes, and delayed skeletal ossification (also seen at 10 mg/kg/day). There were no adverse effects on embryofetal or pup survival. Delivered offspring had decreased body weights (10 and 30 mg/kg/day), and increased incidences of hepatodiaphragmatic nodules and diaphragmatic hernia at 30 mg/kg (the other dose groups were not examined for these findings). Postnatally, delayed vaginal opening was seen at 10 and 30 mg/kg/day and impaired reproductive performance (decreased fertility rate, corpora lutea, implants, live fetuses, and increased post-implantation loss, likely mediated through effects on female offspring) was seen at 30 mg/kg/day. Some maternal toxicity was seen at 30 mg/kg/day however, there was no evidence to suggest that these developmental effects were secondary to maternal toxicity. In pregnant rats receiving aripiprazole injection intravenously (3, 9, and 27 mg/kg/day) during the period of organogenesis, decreased fetal weight and delayed skeletal ossification were seen at the highest dose where it also caused maternal toxicity. Pregnant rabbits were treated with oral doses of 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg/day (2, 3, and 11 times human exposure at MRHD based on AUC and 6, 19, and 65 times the MRHD based on mg/m2) of aripiprazole during the period of organogenesis. At the high dose of 100 mg/kg/day decreased maternal food consumption, and increased abortions were seen as well as increased fetal mortality, decreased fetal weight (also seen at 30 mg/kg/day), increased incidence of a skeletal abnormality (fused sternebrae) (also seen at 30 mg/kg/day). In pregnant rabbits receiving aripiprazole injection intravenously (3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day) during the period of organogenesis, the highest dose, which caused pronounced maternal toxicity, resulted in decreased fetal weight, increased fetal abnormalities (primarily skeletal), and decreased fetal skeletal ossification. The fetal no-effect dose was 10 mg/kg/day, which is 5 times the human exposure at the MRHD based on AUC and is 6 times the MRHD based on mg/m2. In a study in which rats were treated peri- and post-natally with oral doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day (1, 3, and 10 times the MRHD on a mg/m2 basis) of aripiprazole from gestation day 17 through day 21 postpartum, slight maternal toxicity, slightly prolonged gestation an increase in stillbirths and, decreases in pup weight (persisting into adulthood) and survival were seen at 30 mg/kg/day. In rats receiving aripiprazole injection intravenously (3, 8, and 20 mg/kg/day) from gestation day 6 through day 20 postpartum, an increase in stillbirths was seen at 8 and 20 mg/kg/day, and decreases in early postnatal pup weights and survival were seen at 20 mg/kg/day; these effects were seen in presence of maternal toxicity. There were no effects on postnatal behavioral and reproductive development. 8.2 Labor and Delivery The effect of ABILIFY on labor and delivery in humans is unknown. 8.3 Nursing Mothers ABILIFY is present in human breast milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from ABILIFY, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients with major depressive disorder or agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania have not been established. The pharmacokinetics of aripiprazole and dehydro-aripiprazole in pediatric patients, 10 to 17 years of age, were similar to those in adults after correcting for the differences in body weight [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)]. Schizophrenia Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients with schizophrenia were established in a 6‑week, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 202 pediatric patients aged 13 to 17 years [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.1), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1) , and CLINICAL STUDIES (14.1) ]. Although maintenance efficacy in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of aripiprazole pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and pediatric patients. Bipolar I Disorder Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients with bipolar mania were established in a 4‑week, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 197 pediatric patients aged 10 to 17 years [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.2), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1) , and CLINICAL STUDIES (14.2)]. Although maintenance efficacy in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of aripiprazole pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and pediatric patients. The efficacy of adjunctive ABILIFY with concomitant lithium or valproate in the treatment of manic or mixed episodes in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated. However, such efficacy and lack of pharmacokinetic interaction between aripiprazole and lithium or valproate can be extrapolated from adult data, along with comparisons of aripiprazole pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and pediatric patients. Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients demonstrating irritability associated with autistic disorder were established in two 8-week, placebo-controlled clinical trials in 212 pediatric patients aged 6 to 17 years [see INDICATIONS AND USAGE (1), DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.4), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1) , and CLINICAL STUDIES (14.4) ]. A maintenance trial was conducted in pediatric patients (6 to 17 years of age) with irritability associated with autistic disorder. The first phase of this trial was an open-label, flexibly dosed (aripiprazole 2 to 15 mg/day) phase in which patients were stabilized (defined as > 25% improvement on the ABC-I subscale, and a CGI-I rating of “much improved” or “very much improved”) on ABILIFY for 12 consecutive weeks. Overall, 85 patients were stabilized and entered the second, 16-week, double-blind phase where they were randomized to either continue ABILIFY treatment or switch to placebo. In this trial, the efficacy of ABILIFY for the maintenance treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder was not established. Tourette’s Disorder Safety and effectiveness of aripiprazole in pediatric patients with Tourette’s Disorder were established in one 8-week (aged 7 to 17) and one 10-week trial (aged 6 to 18) in 194 pediatric patients [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.5), ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.1) , and CLINICAL STUDIES (14.5)]. Maintenance efficacy in pediatric patients has not been systematically evaluated. Juvenile Animal Studies Aripiprazole in juvenile rats caused mortality, CNS clinical signs, impaired memory and learning, and delayed sexual maturation when administered at oral doses of 10, 20, 40 mg/kg/day from weaning (21 days old) through maturity (80 days old). At 40 mg/kg/day, mortality, decreased activity, splayed hind limbs, hunched posture, ataxia, tremors and other CNS signs were observed in both genders. In addition, delayed sexual maturation was observed in males. At all doses and in a dose-dependent manner, impaired memory and learning, increased motor activity, and histopathology changes in the pituitary (atrophy), adrenals (adrenocortical hypertrophy), mammary glands (hyperplasia and increased secretion), and female reproductive organs (vaginal mucification, endometrial atrophy, decrease in ovarian corpora lutea) were observed. The changes in female reproductive organs were considered secondary to the increase in prolactin serum levels. A No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) could not be determined and, at the lowest tested dose of 10 mg/kg/day, there is no safety margin relative to the systemic exposures (AUC0-24) for aripiprazole or its major active metabolite in adolescents at the maximum recommended pediatric dose of 15 mg/day. All drug-related effects were reversible after a 2-month recovery period, and most of the drug effects in juvenile rats were also observed in adult rats from previously conducted studies. Aripiprazole in juvenile dogs (2 months old) caused CNS clinical signs of tremors, hypoactivity, ataxia, recumbency and limited use of hind limbs when administered orally for 6 months at 3, 10, 30 mg/kg/day. Mean body weight and weight gain were decreased up to 18% in females in all drug groups relative to control values. A NOAEL could not be determined and, at the lowest tested dose of 3 mg/kg/day, there is no safety margin relative to the systemic exposures (AUC0-24) for aripiprazole or its major active metabolite in adolescents at the maximum recommended pediatric dose of 15 mg/day. All drug-related effects were reversible after a 2-month recovery period. 8.5 Geriatric Use No dosage adjustment is recommended for elderly patients [see BOXED WARNING, WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1), and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)]. Of the 13,543 patients treated with oral ABILIFY in clinical trials, 1073 (8%) were ≥65 years old and 799 (6%) were ≥75 years old. Placebo-controlled studies of oral ABILIFY in schizophrenia, bipolar mania, or major depressive disorder did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Of the 749 patients treated with ABILIFY injection in clinical trials, 99 (13%) were ≥65 years old and 78 (10%) were ≥75 years old. Placebo-controlled studies of ABILIFY injection in patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. ABILIFY is not approved for the treatment of patients with psychosis associated with Alzheimer’s disease [see BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1)]. 8.6 CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers Dosage adjustment is recommended in known CYP2D6 poor metabolizers due to high aripiprazole concentrations. Approximately 8% of Caucasians and 3–8% of Black/African Americans cannot metabolize CYP2D6 substrates and are classified as poor metabolizers (PM) [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.7) and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)]. 8.7 Hepatic and Renal Impairment No dosage adjustment for ABILIFY is required on the basis of a patient’s hepatic function (mild to severe hepatic impairment, Child-Pugh score between 5 and 15), or renal function (mild to severe renal impairment, glomerular filtration rate between 15 and 90 mL/minute) [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)]. 8.8 Other Specific Populations No dosage adjustment for ABILIFY is required on the basis of a patient’s sex, race, or smoking status [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].
Pregnancy and lactation
8.3 Nursing Mothers ABILIFY is present in human breast milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from ABILIFY, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Interactions

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS Dosage adjustment due to drug interactions (7.1): Factors Dosage Adjustments for ABILIFY Known CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers Administer half of usual dose Known CYP2D6 Poor Metabolizers and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors Administer a quarter of usual dose Strong CYP2D6 or CYP3A4 inhibitors Administer half of usual dose Strong CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 inhibitors Administer a quarter of usual dose Strong CYP3A4 inducers Double usual dose over 1 to 2 weeks 7.1 Drugs Having Clinically Important Interactions with ABILIFY Table 25: Clinically Important Drug Interactions with ABILIFY: Concomitant Drug Name or Drug Class Clinical Rationale Clinical Recommendation Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors (e.g., itraconazole, clarithromycin) or strong CYP2D6 inhibitors (e.g., quinidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine) The concomitant use of ABILIFY with strong CYP 3A4 or CYP2D6 inhibitors increased the exposure of aripiprazole compared to the use of ABILIFY alone [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)]. With concomitant use of ABILIFY with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor or CYP2D6 inhibitor, reduce the ABILIFY dosage [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.7)]. Strong CYP3A4 Inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, rifampin) The concomitant use of ABILIFY and carbamazepine decreased the exposure of aripiprazole compared to the use of ABILIFY alone [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)]. With concomitant use of ABILIFY with a strong CYP3A4 inducer, consider increasing the ABILIFY dosage [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2.7)]. Antihypertensive Drugs Due to its alpha adrenergic antagonism, aripiprazole has the potential to enhance the effect of certain antihypertensive agents. Monitor blood pressure and adjust dose accordingly [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.8) ]. Benzodiazepines (e.g., lorazepam) The intensity of sedation was greater with the combination of oral aripiprazole and lorazepam as compared to that observed with aripiprazole alone. The orthostatic hypotension observed was greater with the combination as compared to that observed with lorazepam alone [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.8) ]. Monitor sedation and blood pressure. Adjust dose accordingly. 7.2 Drugs Having No Clinically Important Interactions with ABILIFY Based on pharmacokinetic studies, no dosage adjustment of ABILIFY is required when administered concomitantly with famotidine, valproate, lithium, lorazepam. In addition, no dosage adjustment is necessary for substrates of CYP2D6 (e.g., dextromethorphan, fluoxetine, paroxetine, or venlafaxine), CYP2C9 (e.g., warfarin), CYP2C19 (e.g., omeprazole, warfarin, escitalopram), or CYP3A4 (e.g., dextromethorphan) when co-administered with ABILIFY. Additionally, no dosage adjustment is necessary for valproate, lithium, lamotrigine, lorazepam, or sertraline when co-administered with ABILIFY [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].

More information

Category Value
Authorisation number NDA021436
Agency product number 82VFR53I78
Orphan designation No
Product NDC 59148-640,59148-009,59148-008,59148-013,59148-010,59148-011,59148-016,59148-641,59148-007,59148-006
Date Last Revised 23-02-2017
Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG
RXCUI 672540
Marketing authorisation holder Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.
Warnings WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS and SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS WITH ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. ABILIFY is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1) ]. Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults in short-term studies. These studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior with antidepressant use in patients over age 24; there was a reduction in risk with antidepressant use in patients aged 65 and older [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.3) ]. In patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy, monitor closely for worsening, and for emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Advise families and caregivers of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.3) ]. WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS and SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS WITH ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning. • Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. ABILIFY is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis. (5.1) • Increased risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults taking antidepressants. Monitor for worsening and emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. (5.3)

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