Burden of Disease

It is well established that CSU places a significant burden on adult patients’ quality of life (Maurer et al., 2011; Balp et al., 2015). However, it is becoming apparent that CSU also has an impact on children’s quality of life that is comparable or worse than many other chronic conditions (Figure 4) (Beattie and Lewis Jones, 2006).

Figure 4: Mean scores (± standard deviation) for Children’s Life Quality Index (CLQI) as given by 379 children with a chronic skin condition and 161 with other chronic diseases.

Figure 4: Mean scores (± standard deviation) for Children’s Life Quality Index (CLQI) as given by 379 children with a chronic skin condition and 161 with other chronic diseases (Beattie and Lewis Jones, 2006).

A meta-analysis that included the above Beattie study, used the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) to investigate the quality of life impact of various skin conditions. It found urticaria to have a similar mean score (7.1) to psoriasis (8.0) and vitiligo (6.5) and a higher score than acne (5.3) and alopecia (3.1) (Olsen et al., 2016)

Educational impact of paediatric urticaria (Ferrer, 2009):

  • 7.4% of children missed school because of their condition
  • The average number of missed days was 7.5 ±18.5
    • In addition, 3.3% of parents had to take days off work because of their child’s urticaria
  • Children with chronic urticaria had significantly worse performance at school compared with children without urticaria (p=0.029)
    • 4.8% of urticaria patients had “bad school performance” versus 1.9% in children without urticaria

 

Expert Insights 

Impact of urticaria on paediatric patients

Doctor Montse Alvaro offers insights on how urticaria affects quality of life for paediatric patients.