Diagnosis and Assessment

Since there is no definitive test for chronic spontaneous urticaria, diagnosis is based on a thorough medical history and physical examination as well as diagnostic tests. In this section we describe the steps required to diagnose the disease, the diagnostic markers to be aware of and other conditions which can cause hives and angioedema.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Diagnosis guidelines recommend: patient history, physical examination followed by routine diagnostic tests. Highlighting provoking factors, diurnal variation, provocation tests, differential blood counts, pseudoallergen-free diet and more.

Assessment Tools

Assessment Tools

The Urticaria Activity Score (UAS) and UAS7, the Angioedema Activity Score (AAS), Chronic Urticaria Quality of Life Questionnaire (CU-Q2oL), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and Urticaria Control Test (UCT) are highlighted.

Fast Facts

Fast Facts

12 key points on understanding chronic spontaneous urticaria including: there are currently no validated useful biomarkers and there is currently no known cure with first-line treatment of H1-antihistamines, showing less than 50% symptomatic relief.