COPD in Women

This section of the Knowledge Centre aims to provide information surrounding the management of COPD in women.

COPD is a highly debilitating disease that represents a substantial and growing health burden in women.1 Despite this burden, COPD receives scant attention as a women’s health issue.1 Women with COPD symptoms may delay seeking medical advice; reasons for this delay could include: dismissing symptoms as ‘smoker’s cough’ and fear of social stigma.2,3 In addition, evidence suggests that some physicians are more likely to correctly diagnose COPD in men compared with women.1,4–6 There is a need for greater awareness to minimise the risk of COPD in women and to ensure timely and appropriate disease management.1 References can be found here.

Desktop helper

Desktop helper

Improving care for women with COPD: guidance for primary care.

Infographics

Infographics

The growing burden of COPD in women and the realities of living with COPD are two of the infographics available.

Videos

Videos

Video journey accounts of women with COPD, highlighting the need to talk and the importance of staying active.

Key publications

Key publications

Key publications to improve awareness and gender-focused management of COPD.

References

  1. Jenkins et al. Improving the Management of COPD in Women. Chest 2016; S0012-3692(16)62316–4.
  2. Waatevik et al. Increased prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a general population. Respir Med 2013; 107: 1037–45.
  3. Johnson et al. Understanding the Social Consequences of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Stigma and Gender. Proc Am Thorac Soc 2007;4:680–2.
  4. Ancochea et al. Underdiagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in women: quantification of the problem, determinants and proposed actions. Arch Bronconeumol 2013; 49: 223–9.
  5. Chapman et al. Gender bias in the diagnosis of COPD. Chest 2001; 119: 1691–5.
  6. Han et al. Gender and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: why it matters. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2007; 176: 1179–4.