Diabetes consultation

 

Time 2 Do More™ in diabetes

The Time 2 Do More in diabetes initiative sought to understand why we are not able to reach glycaemic goals in type 2 diabetes patients and what are the barriers to optimised diabetes care. By speaking to 337 physicians and 652 patients from around the world, the initiative gained a valuable insight into the challenges faced by patients with type 2 diabetes and their doctors (Strain et al., 2014a). 

A disconnect in communication and low expectations were identified as core issues with the management of this chronic condition (Strain, 2014; Strain et al., 2014a; Strain et al., 2014b). Watch the following animations and videos to get a better understanding of the Time 2 Do More initiative findings – both from the patient’s perspective and the physician’s.

The Time 2 Do More initiative identified a number of factors that physicians treating type 2 diabetes could improve. The following videos discuss one factor that needs to be overcome – clinical inertia.


Dr Päivi Paldánius outlines what is meant by clinical inertia, its impact on type 2 diabetes management as well as providing some more information on the Time 2 Do More initiative.

Please provide feedback on these videos by scoring each question in the panel below on a scale from 0 to 10, where 0 is least and 10 is most.

The patient’s perspective


Discover what patients with type 2 diabetes typically go through following their diagnosis and what can be done to improve their outcomes.

An individual’s experience can often provide a fascinating insight into a problem. In the following video, Dr David Strain interviews a patient about what it felt like to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and the communication challenges she faced.


Dr David Strain speaks to a patient about her experiences of being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Please provide feedback on these videos by scoring each question in the panel below on a scale from 0 to 10, where 0 is least and 10 is most.


The physician’s viewpoint


Learn what diabetes experts think should be done to improve outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes.


Dr David Strain provides his own insights into clinical inertia and his personal commitment to overcoming it.


Sir Michael Hirst discusses the need to keep people with chronic diseases as healthy as possible and how society and governments can help tackle clinical inertia.